Classic Monsters are a group of characters that encapsulates the dozens of original Hollywood films released during the 1920s to the 1950s and also includes more modern movie monsters. These films encompass a great many genres from horror to fantasy and romance, but all incorporate a horror character, and are intended to thrill or scare the audience. The first film was a silent film version of The Hunchback of Notre Dame, which was released in 1923. The films that followed were cinematic representations of popular horror stories. This included Frankenstein, The Invisible Man, The Wolf Man, and the Creature from the Black Lagoon. They were hugely popular in movie theaters during the first half of the twentieth century.

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Classic Monsters

Frankenstein’s Monster
Frankenstein (novel, 1818), Frankenstein (film, 1931)
3D
Dracula
Dracula (novel, 1897), Dracula (film, 1931)
3D
Invisible Man
The Invisible Man (novel, 1897), The Invisible Man (film, 1933)
3D
Phantom of the Opera
Le Fantôme de l'Opéra (1909), The Phantom of the Opera (1925)
3D
Nosferatu
Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horror (1922)
3D
Igor
Frankenstein (1931), Young Frankenstein (1974)
3D
Gort
The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951)
3D

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Frankenstein’s Monster
Multiple illustrations of Frankenstein's Monster standing, walking, and reaching with overall height measurements

Frankenstein’s monster, frequently and inaccurately referred to as Frankenstein, is a tragic villain from Mary Shelley’s 1818 novel Frankenstein. Frankenstein created his monster through a blend of chemistry and alchemy; creating an 8 foot tall, hideous creature that just wanted to be loved. Once shut out of the human society he so desperately wanted to belong to, Frankenstein’s monster sought revenge on his creator, Frankenstein. The novel is also referred to as The Modern Prometheus as a nod to the Greek myth of Prometheus, a character who created humans out of clay and gifted them with fire.

Frankenstein's Monster is described as being 8 foot (2.4 m) tall in Mary Shelley's novel, Frankenstein (1818). Frankenstein's Monster was first portrayed by 5 foot 11 inch (1.8 m) tall Boris Karloff in Frankenstein (1931) with the assistance of lifted boots.

Frankenstein’s monster, frequently and inaccurately referred to as Frankenstein, is a tragic villain from Mary Shelley’s 1818 novel Frankenstein. Frankenstein created his monster through a blend of chemistry and alchemy; creating an 8 foot tall, hideous creature that just wanted to be loved.

Frankenstein's Monster is described as being 8 foot (2.4 m) tall in Mary Shelley's novel, Frankenstein (1818). Frankenstein's Monster was first portrayed by 5 foot 11 inch (1.8 m) tall Boris Karloff in Frankenstein (1931) with the assistance of lifted boots.

Frankenstein’s Monster
Height:
8’ | 2.4 m (novel)
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Length:
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Actor
Boris Karloff (5’11” | 1.8 m)
First Appearance
Frankenstein (novel, 1818), Frankenstein (film, 1931)

Drawings include:
Frankenstein's Monster front, front (walking), side

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Phantom of the Opera
Series of dimensioned height drawings of the original and modern Phantom of the Opera viewed from the front

The Phantom of the Opera, also known as Erik and referred to as The Phantom, is a character from Gaston Leroux’s novel Le Fantôme de l’Opéra from 1909, which has been remade into a movie and musical. Erik is a mysterious, deformed man who haunts a Parisian opera house and falls in love with one of the stars of the show, Christine. Erik captures her during one of the shows after learning she has betrayed him and planned to run away with her lover, Raoul. While holding Christine captive and coercing her into marriage, Raoul and a Persian policeman attempt to rescue her. However they fall into many of Erik’s traps. The Phantom also threatens to blow up the entire opera house, but Christine keeps this plan by cooperating with Erik. Depending on the version (novel, film, or musical), Erik either lets Christine go with Raoul or is bludgeoned to death on the banks of the scenic Seine river by an angry mob.

The Phantom of the Opera, originally portrayed by Lon Chaney in The Phantom of the Opera (1925), is 6 foot 2 inches (1.88 m) tall.

The Phantom of the Opera, also known as Erik, is a character from Gaston Leroux’s novel Le Fantôme de l’Opéra (1909), which has been remade into a movie and musical. Erik is a mysterious, deformed man who haunts a Parisian opera house and falls in love with one of the stars of the show, Christine.

The Phantom of the Opera, originally portrayed by Lon Chaney in The Phantom of the Opera (1925), is 6 foot 2 inches (1.88 m) tall.

Phantom of the Opera
Height:
6’2” | 1.88 m
Width:
Length:
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Actor
Lon Chaney
First Appearance
Le Fantôme de l'Opéra (1909), The Phantom of the Opera (1925)

Drawings include:
The Phantom of the Opera front (classic), side (classic), front (modern)

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Invisible Man
Drawings of the Invisible Man standing as seen from the front and back views with labeled height

The Invisible Man, also known as Griffin, is a character from the 1897 science fiction novella, The Invisible Man, by Henry G. Wells. Griffin was a scientist, who through research with optics, discovered he could make a person unable to reflect light and render them invisible. After performing this experiment on himself, Griffin realizes he cannot undo what he has done. Being completely invisible unnerves Griffin and he desires to begin a “Reign of Terror” throughout the nation. Griffin remains invisible until he is beaten to death at the hands of enraged mob.

The Invisible Man, portrayed by Claude Rains in the Invisible Man (1933), is 5 foot 7 inches (1.70 m) tall.

The Invisible Man, also known as Griffin, is a character from H. G. Wells' The Invisible Man (1897). Griffin was a scientist, who through research with optics, discovered he could make a person unable to reflect light and render them invisible and performs this experiment on himself.

The Invisible Man, portrayed by Claude Rains in the Invisible Man (1933), is 5 foot 7 inches (1.70 m) tall.

Invisible Man
Height:
5’7” | 1.70 m
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Actor
Claude Rains
First Appearance
The Invisible Man (novel, 1897), The Invisible Man (film, 1933)

Drawings include:
Invisible Man front (original), front (modern), back (modern)

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Gremlin
Assortment of drawings of a Gremlin seen from the front and side with overall height dimensions

Gremlins are creatures of folklore, similar to goblins or fairies, famous for causing havoc. Gremlins came to public attention during World War II when they were blamed for technological malfunctions on aircrafts, especially with the Royal Air Force. These Gremlins were typically depicted with spiked backs, sharp teeth, claws, and large eyes. There is also a movie, Gremlins (1984), but these creatures bare little resemblance to the folklore creatures, except for their malicious desire for harm and havoc. In physical appearance, the Gremlins from the movie, Gremlins, resemble a Furby, a popular children’s toy from the late 1990s and early 2000s.

Gremlins, as represented in Gremlins (1984), are roughly 24 inches (61 cm) tall.

Gremlins are creatures of folklore that are famous for causing havoc. Gremlins are typically depicted with spiked backs, sharp teeth, claws, and large eyes. In Gremlins (1984), the creatures bare little resemblance to the folklore creatures, except for their malicious desire for harm and havoc.

Gremlins, as represented in Gremlins (1984), are roughly 24 inches (61 cm) tall.

Gremlin
Height:
24” | 61 cm
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Actor
Peter Cullen
First Appearance
Gremlins (1984)

Drawings include:
Gremlin front, front (aggressive), side

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Nosferatu
Collection of dimensioned illustrations of Nosferatu in various standing postures

Nosferatu is an illegal adaptation of Bram Stoker’s novel Dracula, created by Prana-Film. Nosferatu stars a vampire named Count Orlok who resides in 19th century Transylvania, but requests to buy a house in Germany from Thomas Hutter’s estate company. Once Thomas Hutter arrives at Count Orlok’s estate to sell him his new house, a series of suspicious circumstances arise that lead to Hutter’s discovery that Count Orlok is a vampire. However, he realizes too late, after selling him a house next door to his own in Germany. Count Orlok moves to his new home and is tempted into a blood-sucking trance by Hutter’s wife, Ellen. This turns out to be his downfall as he is too distracted by sucking her blood to realize the rising of the sun and vanishes in a puff of smoke.

Nosferatu, portrayed by Max Schreck in Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horror (1922), is 6 foot 3 inches (1.91 m) tall.

Nosferatu is an adaptation of Bram Stoker’s novel Dracula, created by Prana-Film. Nosferatu stars a vampire named Count Orlok who resides in 19th century Transylvania, but buys a house in Germany. A series of suspicious circumstances arise that lead to the discovery that Count Orlok is a vampire.

Nosferatu, portrayed by Max Schreck in Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horror (1922), is 6 foot 3 inches (1.91 m) tall.

Nosferatu
Height:
6’3” | 1.91 m
Width:
Length:
Depth:
Weight:
Area:
Actor
Max Schreck
First Appearance
Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horror (1922)

Drawings include:
Nosferatu front, side, side (leaning)

Details & Downloads

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