Building Interiors

Interior design is the art and science of enhancing the interior of a building to achieve a healthier and more aesthetically pleasing environment for the people using the space. It involves selecting and coordinating colors, textures, materials, lighting, furniture, and accessories to create a cohesive and functional design. Interior architecture, on the other hand, is the design and layout of the interior space of a building, including elements such as walls, floors, doors, and windows. It involves creating a functional and visually appealing space that is suitable for the intended purpose of the building. Both interior design and interior architecture involve careful consideration of the needs and preferences of the people using the space, as well as the style, mood, and atmosphere that the designer or architect wants to create.

What is the interior of a building?

The interior of a building is the space within the walls, floors, and ceiling of the structure. It includes all the rooms, corridors, and other enclosed spaces that are part of the building. The interior of a building is where people live, work, and carry out various activities, and as such, it is typically designed to be functional and comfortable. The design and layout of the interior of a building play a significant role in the overall look, feel, and functionality of the space.

Is interior design the same as interior decorating?

Interior design and interior decorating are related, but they are not the same thing. Interior design is the art and science of enhancing the interior of a building to achieve a healthier and more aesthetically pleasing environment for the people using the space. Interior decorating, on the other hand, is the process of adding decorative elements to an existing space in order to make it more attractive and personal. While interior designers may also engage in decorating activities, they have a more comprehensive understanding of design principles and are trained to create functional and aesthetically pleasing spaces.

Do architects design interiors?

Architects are trained to design the overall layout and structure of buildings, including the interior spaces. While architects may not be involved in every aspect of interior design, they typically work closely with interior designers or other design professionals to ensure that the interior spaces of a building meet the functional and aesthetic needs of the people who will use them. Architects may also be responsible for specifying materials, finishes, and other elements that contribute to the overall look and feel of the interior spaces.

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Building Interiors Guides
Browse through our curated Building Interiors Guides for additional categorizations, tips, details, variations, styles, and histories of Building Interiors. Guides provide additional insights into the unique properties and shared relationships between elements.

Building Interiors

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English Bond
12000
https://p3d.in/e/wpUPY
GUIDE
3D
English BondPerspective view of a 3D model of a English BondPerspective view of a 3D model of a English Bond
Flemish Bond
13000
https://p3d.in/e/whLWw
GUIDE
3D
Flemish BondView of a Flemish Bond in 3D available for downloadView of a Flemish Bond in 3D available for download
Running Bond
2900
https://p3d.in/e/OkYN0
GUIDE
3D
Running Bond3D model of a Running Bond viewed in perspective3D model of a Running Bond viewed in perspective
Stack Bond - Stretchers
2500
https://p3d.in/e/mTDhx
GUIDE
3D
Stack Bond - StretchersPerspective view of a 3D model of a Stack Bond (Stretchers)Perspective view of a 3D model of a Stack Bond (Stretchers)
Stack Bond - Stretchers
Comparison drawings of the Stack Bond (Stretchers) and other Brick Bond types

The stack bond is a type of brick bond that is characterized by its simple, vertical alignment. In this bond, bricks are laid with their long sides (or stretchers) facing outwards, and each row of bricks is stacked directly on top of the one below it. This creates a pattern of continuous vertical lines that runs the length of the wall. The stack bond is a relatively basic and easy-to-lay bond, and is commonly used in non-load bearing walls or decorative applications. It's a good choice if you want a clean, modern look, or if you just want to get the job done quickly and efficiently. Just be aware that it's not the strongest of the brick bonds, so it might not be the best choice for structural projects or load-bearing walls.

Illustration of the Stack Bond (Stretchers) and an explanation of the pattern
The stack bond is a type of brick bond that is characterized by its simple, vertical alignment. In this bond, bricks are laid with their long sides (or stretchers) facing outwards, and each row of bricks is stacked directly on top of the one below it.

Illustration of the Stack Bond (Stretchers) and an explanation of the pattern
Stack Bond - Stretchers
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Stack Bond (Stretchers) front elevation

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English Bond
Comparison drawings of the English Bond and other Brick Bond types

The English bond is a pattern for laying bricks in which there are rows of bricks with the short end facing out (called headers) followed by rows of bricks with the long side facing out (called stretchers). It's a pretty simple, yet strong pattern that has been around for a long time. It's often used in load-bearing walls or structural projects because it's pretty sturdy. Plus, it has a classic look and is often used in restoration projects or in new buildings that are meant to blend in with older ones. It's not the most flashy or modern of the brick bonds, but it gets the job done and looks good doing it.

Illustration of the English Bond and an explanation of the pattern
The English bond is a pattern for laying bricks in which there are rows of bricks with the short end facing out (called headers) followed by rows of bricks with the long side facing out (called stretchers). It's a pretty simple, yet strong pattern that has been around for a long time.

Illustration of the English Bond and an explanation of the pattern
English Bond
Height:
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Area:

Drawings include:
English Bond front elevation

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Running Bond
Diagram of the English Bond compared to other similar brick bond types

The Running Bond, also known as the stretcher bond, is a type of brick bond that is characterized by its simple, repetitive pattern. In this bond, bricks are laid with their long sides (or stretchers) facing outwards, and each row of bricks is offset from the one above and below it by half a brick length. This creates a pattern of continuous horizontal lines that runs the length of the wall. The running bond is a relatively basic and easy-to-lay bond, and is commonly used in non-load bearing walls or decorative applications. It's a good choice if you want a simple, understated look, or if you just want to get the job done quickly and efficiently. Just be aware that it's not the strongest of the brick bonds, so it might not be the best choice for structural projects or load-bearing walls.

Front elevation drawing of the Running Bond with the pattern logic
The Running Bond, also known as the stretcher bond, is a type of brick bond that is characterized by its simple, repetitive pattern. In this bond, bricks are laid with their long sides (or stretchers) facing outwards, and each row of bricks is offset from the one above and below it by half a length.

Front elevation drawing of the Running Bond with the pattern logic
Running Bond
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Drawings include:
Running Bond front elevation

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Flemish Bond
Group of illustrations of various Brick Bonds compared to the English Bond

The Flemish bond is a type of brick bond that is characterized by its alternating rows of headers and stretchers. In this bond, each row of bricks consists of a header brick followed by a stretcher brick, with the header of one row being centered over the gap between the stretchers of the row below. This creates a diagonal pattern that is visually interesting and adds a touch of sophistication to a wall or building. The Flemish bond is considered to be relatively strong and is often used in decorative applications or in non-load bearing walls. It's a bit more fancy and formal-looking than some of the other brick bonds, so it's a good choice if you want to add a touch of class to your project.

Elevation drawings of the Flemish Bond showing the pattern logic
The Flemish bond is a type of brick bond that is characterized by its alternating rows of headers and stretchers. In this bond, each row of bricks consists of a header brick followed by a stretcher brick, with the header of one row being centered over the gap between the stretchers of the row below.

Elevation drawings of the Flemish Bond showing the pattern logic
Flemish Bond
Height:
Width:
Length:
Depth:
Weight:
Area:

Drawings include:
Flemish Bond front elevation

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