Elevator Layouts | Lift Layouts

Elevator Layouts | Lift Layouts

Description
Description

Elevators, or lifts, are vertical transportation systems used in buildings to move people and goods between different floors. Their layouts vary based on building type and usage. In residential buildings, elevators are typically smaller, designed for a few people. Commercial or public buildings have larger elevators to accommodate more individuals and heavier loads. Freight elevators, used in industrial settings, prioritize space and durability for transporting goods. Inside, elevators have control panels for floor selection and safety features like emergency alarms and telephones.

Some modern elevators offer features like mirrors, informational screens, or music. Elevators are crucial in tall buildings, ensuring efficient, accessible movement for everyone, including those with mobility challenges. They're a key component in the functionality of multi-story buildings, shaping how we navigate vertical spaces.

History
History

Elevator layouts have evolved significantly since their inception. Initially, elevators were basic lift systems used primarily for industrial purposes, like transporting goods in factories or mines. With the advent of safer elevator designs in the 19th century, notably Elisha Otis's safety brake, elevators began to be used in commercial and residential buildings. Early passenger elevators were quite luxurious, often opulently decorated and operated by attendants.

As technology progressed, the layout of elevators became more standardized and focused on efficiency and safety. This led to the familiar box-like design, automatic doors, and control panels we see today, optimized for carrying multiple passengers and providing quick, safe transportation between floors in buildings.

Future
Future

The future of elevator layouts might see significant advancements, aligning with current technological trends. We could see the adoption of horizontal as well as vertical movement, much like the concept of the 'ropeless' elevator, allowing for more complex building designs. Elevators might also become more personalized and interactive, equipped with smart systems that recognize individual preferences for lighting and music.

Incorporation of virtual displays could transform elevator walls into screens showing news, weather, or scenic views. Additionally, sustainability will be a key focus, with elevators using energy-efficient technologies and regenerative drives. Overall, elevators are likely to become more than just transportation devices, evolving into smart, efficient, and enjoyable spaces.

Common Questions
Common Questions
What are the factors to consider when planning an elevator layout?

On top of functionality, the important factors to consider when planning an elevator layout include: safety, quality, aesthetics, capacity (especially during peak times), and the environment of building type for which the elevator is to be installed.

How big is a common elevator?

A common residential elevator is usually 3’ wide by 4’ deep ( .91 x 1.22 m). In compliance with ADA standards, the depth should have a minimum of 51 inches (1.30 m), width of 68 inches (1.73 m), and door width of 36 inches (.91 m). The common elevator for office buildings are 6’ wide by 5’ deep (1.83 x 1.53 m). The doors of the elevator are typically 4’ wide (1.22 m).

Where should elevators be located in a floor plan?

The ultimate location of elevators is dependent on the building type. In many cases, the elevators are positioned near stairwells and in the center of buildings to create a core service or circulation area. In public or commercial buildings, the elevators are located in the lobbies next to stairways. The position of this form of vertical transportation should take into consideration its accessibility and distance to be traveled by occupants.


Layouts

* Under Development *

Three | Triple Lift Elevator Bank
Plan layout with dimensions of a Bank of Three Lifts with adjacent waiting area

Three Lift Elevator Banks are low to medium capacity layouts used in buildings with low to medium average occupancy loads. Based on a range of conditions including the type of project, occupancy load, and desired wait times, Three Lift Elevator Banks should be used for offices with floor areas around 135,000 ft2 (12,542 m2), hotels with 225 rooms, and housing projects with 270 units.

Combining a single row of lifts and an adjacent waiting area with a clearance width of 10’ (3 m), or 1.5x car depth, Three Lift Elevator Banks have typical widths of 27’ (8.2 m) and depths of 18’6” (5.6 m). Three Lift Elevator Banks have overall areas around 494 ft2 (46 m2).

Three Lift Elevator Banks are low to medium capacity layouts used in buildings with low to medium average occupancy loads. Three Lift Elevator Banks should be used for offices with floor areas around 135,000 ft2 (12,542 m2), hotels with 225 rooms, and housing projects with 270 units.

Combining a single row of lifts and an adjacent waiting area with a clearance width of 10’ (3 m), or 1.5x car depth, Three Lift Elevator Banks have typical widths of 27’ (8.2 m) and depths of 18’6” (5.6 m). Three Lift Elevator Banks have overall areas around 494 ft2 (46 m2).

Three | Triple Lift Elevator Bank
Height:
Width:
Length:
Depth:
Weight:
Area:

Cars | Lifts: 3
Width (Overall): 26’9” | 8.2 m
Depth (Overall): 18’6” | 5.6 m
Area (Overall): 494 ft2 | 46 m2
Elevator Depth: 7’11” | 2.4 m
Waiting Depth: 10’ | 3 m or 1.5x car depth

Drawings include:
Three Lift Elevator Bank plan

Downloads

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Two | Double Lift Elevator Bank
Measured layout for a Two Lift Elevator Bank with dimensions on the plan

Two Lift Elevator Banks are low capacity layouts used in buildings with limited occupancy loads. Based on a range of conditions including the type of project, occupancy load, and desired wait times, Two Lift Elevator Banks should be used for offices with floor areas around 90,000 ft2 (8,361 m2), hotels with 150 rooms, and housing projects with 180 units.

Combining a single row of lifts and an adjacent waiting area with a clearance width of 10’ (3 m), or 1.5x car depth, Two Lift Elevator Banks have typical widths of 18’ (5.5 m) and depths of 18’6” (5.6 m). Two Lift Elevator Banks have overall areas around 333 ft2 (31 m2).

Two Lift Elevator Banks are low capacity layouts used in buildings with limited occupancy loads and demands. Two Lift Elevator Banks should be used for offices with floor areas around 90,000 ft2 (8,361 m2), hotels with 150 rooms, and housing projects with 180 units.

Combining a single row of lifts and an adjacent waiting area with a clearance width of 10’ (3 m), or 1.5x car depth, Two Lift Elevator Banks have typical widths of 18’ (5.5 m) and depths of 18’6” (5.6 m). Two Lift Elevator Banks have overall areas around 333 ft2 (31 m2).

Two | Double Lift Elevator Bank
Height:
Width:
Length:
Depth:
Weight:
Area:

Cars | Lifts: 2
Width (Overall): 18’1” | 5.5 m
Depth (Overall): 18’6” | 5.6 m
Area (Overall): 333 ft2 | 31 m2
Elevator Depth: 7’11” | 2.4 m
Waiting Depth: 10’ | 3 m or 1.5x car depth

Drawings include:
Two Lift Elevator Bank layout plan

Downloads

2D Downloads

3D Downloads

Eight Lift Elevator Bank
Play layout of an Eight Lift Elevator Bank with dimensions for lift and waiting area lengths, widths, depths

Eight Lift Elevator Banks are high capacity layouts used in buildings with large occupancy loads. Based on the type of project, occupancy load, and desired wait times, Eight Lift Elevator Banks should be used for offices with floor areas around 360,000 ft2 (33,445 m2), hotels with 600 rooms, and housing projects with 720 units.

Combining two rows of lifts around a central waiting area with a clearance width of 12’ (3.7 m), or 2x car depth, Eight Lift Elevator Banks have typical widths of 36’ (10.9 m) and depths of 28’ (8.5 m). Eight Lift Elevator Banks have overall areas around 992 ft2 (92 m2).

Eight Lift Elevator Banks are high capacity layouts used in buildings with large occupancy loads. Based on the project, occupancy, and wait times, Eight Lift Elevator Banks should be used for offices with floor areas around 360,000 ft2 (33,445 m2), hotels with 600 rooms, and housing of 720 units.

Combining two rows of lifts around a central waiting area with a clearance width of 12’ (3.7 m), or 2x car depth, Eight Lift Elevator Banks have typical widths of 36’ (10.9 m) and depths of 28’ (8.5 m). Eight Lift Elevator Banks have overall areas around 992 ft2 (92 m2).

Eight Lift Elevator Bank
Height:
Width:
Length:
Depth:
Weight:
Area:

Cars | Lifts: 8
Width (Overall): 35’8” | 10.9 m
Depth (Overall): 27’10” | 8.5 m
Area (Overall): 992 ft2 | 92 m2
Elevator Depth: 7’11” | 2.4 m
Waiting Depth: 12’ | 3.7 m or 2x car depth

Drawings include:
Eight Lift Elevator Bank plan layout

Downloads

2D Downloads

3D Downloads

Six Lift Elevator Bank
Dimensioned plan layout of a Six Lift Elevator Bank with two pairs of three lifts around a central waiting area

Six Lift Elevator Banks are medium to high capacity layouts used in buildings with large occupancy loads. Based on a range of conditions including the type of project, occupancy load, and desired wait times, Six Lift Elevator Banks should be used for offices with floor areas around 270,000 ft2 (25,084 m2), hotels with 450 rooms, and housing projects with 540 units.

Combining two rows of lifts around a central waiting area with a clearance width of 10’6” (3.2 m), or 1.75x car depth, Six Lift Elevator Banks have typical widths of 27’ (8.2 m) and depths of 27’ (8.2 m). Six Lift Elevator Banks have overall areas around 704 ft2 (65 m2).

Six Lift Elevator Banks are medium to high capacity layouts used in buildings with large occupancy loads. Based on a range of project specific conditions, Six Lift Elevator Banks should be used for offices with floor areas around 270,000 ft2 (25,084 m2), hotels with 450 rooms, or 540 housing units.

Combining two rows of lifts around a central waiting area with a clearance width of 10’6” (3.2 m), or 1.75x car depth, Six Lift Elevator Banks have typical widths of 27’ (8.2 m) and depths of 27’ (8.2 m). Six Lift Elevator Banks have overall areas around 704 ft2 (65 m2).

Six Lift Elevator Bank
Height:
Width:
Length:
Depth:
Weight:
Area:

Cars | Lifts: 6
Width (Overall): 26’9” | 8.2 m
Depth (Overall): 26’4” | 8 m
Area (Overall): 704 ft2 | 65 m2
Elevator Depth: 7’11” | 2.4 m
Waiting Depth: 10’6” | 3.2 m or 1.75x car depth

Drawings include:
Six Lift Elevator Bank plan layout

Downloads

2D Downloads

3D Downloads

Four Lift Elevator Bank
Plan drawing of a Four Lift Bank with dimensions showing widths and lengths of the waiting area and lifts

Four Lift Elevator Banks are medium capacity layouts used in buildings with medium average occupancy loads. Based on a range of conditions including the type of project, occupancy load, and desired wait times, Four Lift Elevator Banks should be used for offices with floor areas around 180,000 ft2 (16,723 m2), hotels with 300 rooms, and housing projects with 360 units.

Combining one row of lifts and an adjacent waiting area with a clearance width of 10’ (3 m), or 1.5x car depth, Four Lift Elevator Banks have typical widths of 36’ (10.9 m) and depths of 18’6” (5.6 m). Four Lift Elevator Banks have overall areas around 658 ft2 (61 m2).

Four Lift Elevator Banks are medium capacity layouts used in buildings with medium average occupancy loads. Four Lift Elevator Banks should be used for offices with floor areas around 180,000 ft2 (16,723 m2), hotels with 300 rooms, and housing projects with 360 units.

Combining one row of lifts and an adjacent waiting area with a clearance width of 10’ (3 m), or 1.5x car depth, Four Lift Elevator Banks have typical widths of 36’ (10.9 m) and depths of 18’6” (5.6 m). Four Lift Elevator Banks have overall areas around 658 ft2 (61 m2).

Four Lift Elevator Bank
Height:
Width:
Length:
Depth:
Weight:
Area:

Cars | Lifts: 4
Width (Overall): 35’8” | 10.9 m
Depth (Overall): 18’6” | 5.6 m
Area (Overall): 658 ft2 | 61 m2
Elevator Depth: 7’11” | 2.4 m
Waiting Depth: 10’ | 3 m or 1.5x car depth

Drawings include:
Four Lift Elevator Bank plan

Downloads

2D Downloads

3D Downloads