Door operation refers to the diverse variety of door typologies and strategies for closing and securing a space. Designed for a range of everyday uses in buildings including homes, offices, retail and public spaces, and industrial settings, the choice of door operation is essential for controlling the environment and the flow of people from the exterior to the interior of a space. Common everyday forms of door operation include swinging doors, sliding doors, folding doors, revolving doors, and overhead shutter doors.

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Bypass Sliding Doors
Axon drawing of a Bypass Sliding Door

In a Bypass Sliding Door one section of the door passes in front of the other. They are set in a double opening and are often used on closets or pantries. As the top track supports all of the weight, the bottom track is optional, and it is used only to help guide the door. The bottom guide should be used when there is a concern that the door might be bumped hard enough to swing. The system is simple and reasonably priced to divide or close off various storage spaces. With numerous configurations, Bypass Sliding Doors maintain the ease of use and offer a straightforward installation.

Plan drawings of Bypass Sliding Doors in various positions including closed, open, and operational
In a Bypass Sliding Door one section of the door passes in front of the other. They are set in a double opening and are often used on closets or pantries. As the top track supports all of the weight, the bottom track is optional, and it is used only to help guide the door.

Plan drawings of Bypass Sliding Doors in various positions including closed, open, and operational
Bypass Sliding Doors
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Drawings include:
Bypass Sliding Doors plan (closed), plan (open), plan (operation)

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Swinging | Hinged Doors
Axon diagram of Swinging | Hinged Doors with the door open

Swinging doors, also commonly known as hinged doors, operate by turning on hinges installed on a side jamb. When pulled or pushed, a swing door pivots around the jamb and the threshold. These doors require designers to verify required clearances of the door swing to make sure that there is enough space for the door to fully open. The swing door is the most commonly used door system because of its convenience in allowing access and passage. In most cases the rotation axis is vertical, but it can also be hinged so that the rotation axis is not in the plane of the door. This reduces the space required on the side the door opens; it is found in train and airplane doors, so the door to the toilet opens inward. Some variations of Hinged Doors include Swing Doors (that open inward and outward), French Doors, Mead Doors, Dutch Doors, and Garden Doors.

Collection of plan drawings of Swinging | Hinged doors showing open, closed, and operating positions
Swinging doors, also commonly known as hinged doors, operate by turning on hinges installed on a side jamb. When pulled or pushed, a swing door pivots around the jamb and the threshold. The swing door is the most commonly used door system because of its convenience in allowing access and passage.

Collection of plan drawings of Swinging | Hinged doors showing open, closed, and operating positions
Swinging | Hinged Doors
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Benefits: Effective for weather proofing and acoustic and thermal insulation
Use:
Exterior and interior
Fire Rated:
Possible

Drawings include:
Swinging | Hinged Doors plan (closed), plan (operation), plan (open), plans (people)

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Pivoting Center Hung Doors
Pivoting Center Hung door illustrated in axon view

A Pivoting Center Hung Door is a door that is supported by a pivot that is recessed in the floor at a point located on the center line of the door’s thickness. It can be either single-swing or double acting. When used on a double acting door, the edges of the door cut the radius edge to allow the door to swing in both directions. They can be used on many door types, and common applications are rescue hardware applications in hospitals or other healthcare facilities. The center hung pivots are mortised into the top and bottom of the door, which provide a low profile and are often unnoticeable.

Variations of plan views of a Pivoting Center Hung door drawn open, closed, and in operation
A Pivoting Center Hung Door is a door that is supported by a pivot that is recessed in the floor at a point located on the center line of the door’s thickness. It can be either single-swing or double acting. They can be used on many door types, and common applications are in healthcare facilities.

Variations of plan views of a Pivoting Center Hung door drawn open, closed, and in operation
Pivoting Center Hung Doors
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Drawings include:
Pivoting Center Hung Door plan (open), plan (closed), plan (operation)

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Folding Doors
Axon diagram of Folding Doors showing operation

A Folding Door opens by folding back in sections or panels. They are known as ‘bi-fold doors’, though most Folding Doors have more than two panels. They can be used as internal or external room dividers and can be made from a variety of materials. Most Folding Doors are glazed with wood, aluminum, or upvc panels. Compared to a traditional door, a Folding Door has a greater aperture, so they increase physical and visual accessibility between internal rooms or an internal room and an outside space.  Some examples include interior Folding Doors, for closets and pantries, folding patio doors, and larger folding wall systems for residential or commercial use.

Multiple plans of Folding Doors from closed to open with various degrees of operation in between
A Folding Door opens by folding back in sections or panels. They are known as ‘bi-fold doors’, though most Folding Doors have more than two panels. They can be used as internal or external room dividers and can be made from a variety of materials.

Multiple plans of Folding Doors from closed to open with various degrees of operation in between
Folding Doors
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Drawings include:
Folding Doors plan (open), plan (closed), plans (degrees of operation), axon

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Pocket Sliding Doors
Axon drawing illustrating the operation of a Pocket Sliding Door

A Pocket Sliding Door is a door that disappears into a compartment in the adjacent wall when it is fully open. They are often used when there is no room for the swing of a hinged door. Depending on how wide an entry is, a Pocket Sliding Door can have a single door or a double door. They can be open and closed by a roller suspended from an overhead track, or from tracks and guides along the floor. Using a Pocket Sliding Door over a hinged door can free up more space; however, the hidden parts and hardware can make it difficult to replace or repair when something goes wrong.

Drawings of various phases of operating a Pocket Sliding Door showing open, closed and operating positions
A Pocket Sliding Door is a door that disappears into a compartment in the adjacent wall when it is fully open. They are often used when there is no room for the swing of a hinged door. Depending on how wide an entry is, a Pocket Sliding Door can have a single door or a double door.

Drawings of various phases of operating a Pocket Sliding Door showing open, closed and operating positions
Pocket Sliding Doors
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Drawings include:
Pocket Sliding Doors plans, plans (people)

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