Lemuriforms | Lemuriformes

Lemuriformes are mostly found in Africa and Asia and are classified under the superfamily Lemuroidea. Lemuriformes are large, unique, and considered among the smallest primates living today. They are mostly grouped using their specialized toothcomb teeth used for grooming. They are primarily arboreal and inhabit places like rainforests, littoral forests, high-altitude habitats, and spiny and seasonally dry forests. They have a long face and eyes positioned to the side of the head. They feed mostly on fruits and leaves. Lemuriforms undergo seasonal breeding and in their family structure females are more dominant than males. Some Lemuriforms hibernate.

Why do lemurs have two tongues?

Lemurs are social creatures that love to groom a lot and this is done with the second tongue that sits under the main tongue. This second tongue is made of stiff cartilage and these animals use it to remove unwanted materials from their colleague’s hair and also remove any hair stuck between their teeth. It is more of a dental combo.

Are lemurs friendly?

Lemurs are only friendly to other lemurs since they live in a social grouping of about 20. But for domestication, they don’t make friendly pets and would show their wild aggressive instinct when constantly grabbed. They will bite or scratch. Besides, they are also demanding and require a lot of veterinary care compared to other pets.

What are the predators of lemurs?

Lemurs are native to Madagascar, where they are a favorite meal for fossas, the Madagascar buzzard, and the Madagascar harrier-hawk. They use alarm calls to alert other members of danger, while others are nocturnal, using the cover of darkness for protection. Wild dogs and hawks may also feed on these carnivores.

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Lemuriforms Guides
Browse through our curated Lemuriforms Guides for additional categorizations, tips, details, variations, styles, and histories of Lemuriforms. Guides provide additional insights into the unique properties and shared relationships between elements.
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Aye-Aye
11000
7.3”-9.4” | 18.5-24 cm (All Fours)
6.9”-9.1” | 17.5-23 cm
13”-17” | 33-43 cm
4.4-6 lb | 2-2.7 kg
20-23 years
Aye-Aye
24.000
23.000
43.000
2.700
23.00
11000
GUIDE
3D
Aye-Aye
11”-13” | 28-33 cm (All Fours)
9.1”-10.6” | 23-27 cm
14.6”-21.7” | 37-55 cm
11-18.7 lb | 5-8.5 kg
21-30 years
Diademed Sifaka
33.000
27.000
55.000
8.500
30.00
9200
GUIDE
3D
Diademed Sifaka
2.6”-3.1” | 6.5-8 cm (All Fours)
2.4”-2.75” | 6-7 cm
4.7”-5.5” | 12-14 cm
2.1-2.5 oz | .06-.07 kg
6-8 years (wild); 13-18 years (captivity)
Gray Mouse Lemur
8.000
7.000
14.000
0.070
18.00
8600
GUIDE
3D
Gray Mouse Lemur
Indri
4100
18.5”-20.5” | 47-52 cm (All Fours)
13.4”-15” | 34-38 cm
25.2”-28.3” | 64-72 cm
15.4-22 lb | 7-10 kg
15-22 years (wild); 20-40 years (captivity)
Indri
52.000
38.000
72.000
10.000
40.00
4100
GUIDE
3D
Indri
3.3”-4.5” | 8.5-11.5 cm (All Fours)
2.75”-3.5” | 7-9 cm
7.5”-9.8” | 19-25 cm
.7-1.3 lb | .3-.6 kg
15-17 years (wild); 16-20 years (captivity)
Pygmy Slow Loris
11.500
9.000
25.000
0.600
20.00
1500
GUIDE
3D
Pygmy Slow Loris
2.75”-5.9” | 7-15 cm (All Fours)
1.6”-3.1” | 4-8 cm
4.7”-9.8” | 12-25 cm
2.8-6 oz | .08-.17 kg
15-18 years (wild); 17-22 years (captivity)
Red Slender Loris
15.000
8.000
25.000
0.170
22.00
100
GUIDE
3D
Red Slender Loris
9.1”-10.2” | 23-26 cm (All Fours)
5.5”-6.7” | 14-17 cm
15.4”-18.1” | 39-46 cm
4.9-6.6 lb | 2.2-3 kg
16-19 years (wild); 24-33 years (captivity)
Ring-Tailed Lemur
26.000
17.000
46.000
3.000
33.00
3600
GUIDE
3D
Ring-Tailed Lemur
Indri (Indri indri)
Comparison drawing of the Indri compared to similar Lemuriform species at scale

The Indri (Indri indri), or Babakoto, is a species of lemur native to Madagascar. It is one of the largest lemurs still in existence, and is recognizable by its black and white coat in the northern indri and black coat in the southern indri, and its large round eyes. Indri are vegetarian, largely folivores and frugivores, enjoying leaves, fruits, and tree flowers. They live in the lowland rainforests of eastern Madagascar, never leaving the trees as they swing from place to place. Their call can be heard from over a mile away. In Madagascar it is taboo to hunt the indri.

Indris have a body length of 25.2”-28.3” (64-72 cm), tail length of 2”-2.4” (5-6 cm), height on all fours of 18.5”-20.5” (47-52 cm), and body width between 13.4”-15” (34-38 cm). The typical weight of the Indri is in the range of 15.4-22 lb (7-10 kg). Indris have lifespans between 15-22 years in the wild and 20-40 years in captivity.

Series of dimensioned drawings of the Indri in front and side views
The Indri (Indri indri), or Babakoto, is a species of lemur native to Madagascar. It is one of the largest lemurs still in existence, and is recognizable by its black and white coat in the northern indri and black coat in the southern indri, and its large round eyes.

Indris have a body length of 25.2”-28.3” (64-72 cm), tail length of 2”-2.4” (5-6 cm), height on all fours of 18.5”-20.5” (47-52 cm), and body width between 13.4”-15” (34-38 cm). The typical weight of the Indri is in the range of 15.4-22 lb (7-10 kg). Indris have lifespans between 15-22 years in the wild and 20-40 years in captivity.

Series of dimensioned drawings of the Indri in front and side views
Indri (Indri indri)
Height:
18.5”-20.5” | 47-52 cm (All Fours)
Width:
13.4”-15” | 34-38 cm
Length:
25.2”-28.3” | 64-72 cm
Depth:
Weight:
15.4-22 lb | 7-10 kg
Area:

Tail Length: 2”-2.4” | 5-6 cm

Scientific Name
Indri indri
Lifespan
15-22 years (wild); 20-40 years (captivity)

Drawings include:
Indri side elevation (assorted), front

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Aye-Aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis)
Comparison drawing of the Aye-Aye compared to similar Lemuriform species at scale

The Aye-Aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis) is a species of lemur native to Madagascar. They are known as one of the strangest looking primates, bearing little resemblance to apes or monkeys and far more to bats. Their large ears and even longer claws are remarkable, but their most distinguishing feature is their bushy tail. Aye-ayes love eating insects, which they find using their large ears to tap wood for hollow parts, and then use their claws to dig into the log and scoop out their prey. They are the largest nocturnal primate, and the only known primate that hunts using echolocation. In Madagascar they are considered bad luck, similar to a black cat in the US.

Aye-Ayes have a body length of 13”-17” (33-43 cm), tail length of 17.7”-23.6” (45-60 cm), height on all fours of 7.3”-9.4” (18.5-24 cm), and body width between 6.9”-9.1” (17.5-23 cm). The typical weight of the Aye-Aye is in the range of 4.4-6 lb (2-2.7 kg). Aye-Ayes have lifespans between 20-23 years.

Series of dimensioned drawings of the Aye-Aye in front and side views
The Aye-Aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis) is a species of lemur native to Madagascar. They are known as one of the strangest looking primates, bearing little resemblance to apes or monkeys and far more to bats. Their large ears and even longer claws are remarkable, but they also have a bushy tail.

Aye-Ayes have a body length of 13”-17” (33-43 cm), tail length of 17.7”-23.6” (45-60 cm), height on all fours of 7.3”-9.4” (18.5-24 cm), and body width between 6.9”-9.1” (17.5-23 cm). The typical weight of the Aye-Aye is in the range of 4.4-6 lb (2-2.7 kg). Aye-Ayes have lifespans between 20-23 years.

Series of dimensioned drawings of the Aye-Aye in front and side views
Aye-Aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis)
Height:
7.3”-9.4” | 18.5-24 cm (All Fours)
Width:
6.9”-9.1” | 17.5-23 cm
Length:
13”-17” | 33-43 cm
Depth:
Weight:
4.4-6 lb | 2-2.7 kg
Area:

Tail Length: 17.7”-23.6” | 45-60 cm

Scientific Name
Daubentonia madagascariensis
Lifespan
20-23 years

Drawings include:

Aye-Aye side elevation (assorted), front

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Pygmy Slow Loris (Nycticebus pygmaeus)
Drawing comparing the size of the Pygmy Slow Loris to similar Lemuriform species

The Pygmy Slow Loris (Nycticebus pygmaeus) is a small primate native to southeastern Asia. They are recognizable by their round eyes, huge compared to their face, and their short dense coat. Their large eyes help them see in the dark: an important ability since they are nocturnal hunters. The pygmy slow loris is the only venomous primate and one of the few venomous mammals. They secret the venom from their elbows and then lick it to make their bites venomous. They live in the rainforests of Vietman, Laos, and Yunnan, China, and live almost entirely in the trees, never touching the ground.

Pygmy Slow Loris' have a body length of 7.5”-9.8” (19-25 cm), tail length of .4”-.8” (1-2 cm), height on all fours of 3.3”-4.5” (8.5-11.5 cm), and body width between 2.75”-3.5” (7-9 cm). The typical weight of the Pygmy Slow Loris is in the range of .7-1.3 lb (.3-.6 kg). Pygmy Slow Loris' have lifespans between 15-17 years in the wild and 16-20 years in captivity.

Collection of dimensioned scaled drawings of the Pygmy Slow Loris viewed from the side and front elevations
The Pygmy Slow Loris (Nycticebus pygmaeus) is a small primate native to southeastern Asia. They are recognizable by their round eyes, huge compared to their face, and their short dense coat. Their large eyes help them see in the dark: an important ability since they are nocturnal hunters.

Pygmy Slow Loris' have a body length of 7.5”-9.8” (19-25 cm), tail length of .4”-.8” (1-2 cm), height on all fours of 3.3”-4.5” (8.5-11.5 cm), and body width between 2.75”-3.5” (7-9 cm). The typical weight of the Pygmy Slow Loris is in the range of .7-1.3 lb (.3-.6 kg). Pygmy Slow Loris' have lifespans between 15-17 years in the wild and 16-20 years in captivity.

Collection of dimensioned scaled drawings of the Pygmy Slow Loris viewed from the side and front elevations
Pygmy Slow Loris (Nycticebus pygmaeus)
Height:
3.3”-4.5” | 8.5-11.5 cm (All Fours)
Width:
2.75”-3.5” | 7-9 cm
Length:
7.5”-9.8” | 19-25 cm
Depth:
Weight:
.7-1.3 lb | .3-.6 kg
Area:

Tail Length: .4”-.8” | 1-2 cm

Scientific Name
Nycticebus pygmaeus
Lifespan
15-17 years (wild); 16-20 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Pygmy Slow Loris side elevation (assorted), front

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Gray Mouse Lemur (Microcebus murinus)
Scale illustration of an average Gray Mouse Lemur compared to other species of Lemuriforms

The Gray Mouse Lemur (Microcebus murinus) is a genus of small primate species native to Madagascar. In fact, mouse lemurs are actually the smallest primates in existence. Aside from their size, they also have pointed noses and rounded ears that also resemble a mouse. They can be found across Madagascar in the full range of the island’s forest habitats. The gray mouse lemur plays a particularly important role in the ecosystem; they eat the moths covered in pollen, thus helping pollinate the baobab tree. Also like mice, they are omnivores, able to adapt to eat whatever food is available in any given season.

Gray Mouse Lemurs have a body length of 4.7”-5.5” (12-14 cm), tail length of 5.1”-5.9” (13-15 cm), height on all fours of 2.6”-3.1” (6.5-8 cm), and body width between 2.4”-2.75” (6-7 cm). The typical weight of the Gray Mouse Lemur is in the range of 2.1-2.5 oz (.06-.07 kg). Gray Mouse Lemurs have lifespans between 6-8 years in the wild and 13-18 years in captivity.

Group of measured illustrations of the Gray Mouse Lemur seen from the front and side
The Gray Mouse Lemur (Microcebus murinus) is a genus of small primate species native to Madagascar. In fact, mouse lemurs are actually the smallest primates in existence. Aside from their size, they also have pointed noses and rounded ears that also resemble a mouse.

Gray Mouse Lemurs have a body length of 4.7”-5.5” (12-14 cm), tail length of 5.1”-5.9” (13-15 cm), height on all fours of 2.6”-3.1” (6.5-8 cm), and body width between 2.4”-2.75” (6-7 cm). The typical weight of the Gray Mouse Lemur is in the range of 2.1-2.5 oz (.06-.07 kg). Gray Mouse Lemurs have lifespans between 6-8 years in the wild and 13-18 years in captivity.

Group of measured illustrations of the Gray Mouse Lemur seen from the front and side
Gray Mouse Lemur (Microcebus murinus)
Height:
2.6”-3.1” | 6.5-8 cm (All Fours)
Width:
2.4”-2.75” | 6-7 cm
Length:
4.7”-5.5” | 12-14 cm
Depth:
Weight:
2.1-2.5 oz | .06-.07 kg
Area:

Tail Length: 5.1”-5.9” | 13-15 cm

Scientific Name
Microcebus murinus
Lifespan
6-8 years (wild); 13-18 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Gray Mouse Lemur side elevation (assorted), front

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Red Slender Loris (Loris tardigradus)
Scale illustration of an average Red Slender Loris compared to other species of Lemuriforms

The Red Slender Loris (Loris tardigradus) is a small primate native to Sri Lanka. They have huge, brown eyes and small, mouse-like ears. They are carnivores, exclusively living off their prey, including geckos, lizards, dragonflies, and other insects. Their digestive system is so powerful that it can process poison, allowing them to eat toxic insects. They live in the southwestern rainforests of Sri Lanka, sticking to the treetops rather than the forest floor. Like many other lorises, the red slender loris is nocturnal, and their big eyes help them see at night. They typically move slowly and noiselessly, but can climb rapidly when motivated.

Red Slender Loris' have a body length of 4.7”-9.8” (12-25 cm), height on all fours of 2.75”-5.9” (7-15 cm), and body width between 1.6”-3.1” (4-8 cm). The typical weight of the Red Slender Loris is in the range of 2.8-6 oz (.08-.17 kg). Red Slender Loris' have lifespans between 15-18 years in the wild and 17-22 years in captivity.

Group of measured illustrations of the Red Slender Loris seen from the front and side
The Red Slender Loris (Loris tardigradus) is a small primate native to Sri Lanka. They have huge, brown eyes and small, mouse-like ears. They are carnivores, exclusively living off their prey, including geckos, lizards, dragonflies, and other insects.

Red Slender Loris' have a body length of 4.7”-9.8” (12-25 cm), height on all fours of 2.75”-5.9” (7-15 cm), and body width between 1.6”-3.1” (4-8 cm). The typical weight of the Red Slender Loris is in the range of 2.8-6 oz (.08-.17 kg). Red Slender Loris' have lifespans between 15-18 years in the wild and 17-22 years in captivity.

Group of measured illustrations of the Red Slender Loris seen from the front and side
Red Slender Loris (Loris tardigradus)
Height:
2.75”-5.9” | 7-15 cm (All Fours)
Width:
1.6”-3.1” | 4-8 cm
Length:
4.7”-9.8” | 12-25 cm
Depth:
Weight:
2.8-6 oz | .08-.17 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Loris tardigradus
Lifespan
15-18 years (wild); 17-22 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Red Slender Loris side elevation (assorted), front

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