Rodents are classified by a single pair of continuously growing incisors in both their upper and lower jaws; the length of their incisors are maintained by gnawing, which is how they eat. The diet of Rodents usually consists of seeds and plants, but some species do have more varied diets. Historically, Rodents have been keep as pets, used as laboratory animals, and treated as pests. Rodents accidentally introduced as invasive species to new ecosystems, most notably islands, have been seen to wreak havoc and cause extinction of naturally-occurring species. Rodents are found on all continents, except Antarctica, and are the only species, besides Bats and Sea Lions, to reach Australia without human introduction.

What do rodents eat?

A rodent’s diet depends on the species as well as habitat. For example, mice and rats are able to carry a flexible diet, and quickly adapt to the food available in their surroundings. Squirrels and beavers have more specific food requirements. Beavers exclusively eat plants such as grass and twigs. Rodents generally eat nuts, meat, fish, fruits, berries, and food scraps.

How do you keep rodents out of a garden?

In order to keep rodents out of a garden remove any shelters they have such as brush piles and tall grass, remove food sources, control lawn grubs, and maintain the garden clean by keeping garbage and recycling bins clean. Also seal any holes, place fences, and place mesh tubes around any plants to prevent rodents from eating them.

Where do rodents live?

There are about 2,050 species of rodents and these make up most the most diversified mammalian order. Rodents live all over the world except Antarctica. They can be found in almost every single country, as well as every type of habitat, including man-made environments. Rodents can be arboreal, semi-aquatic, or fossorial.

Rodents

Common Vole
.5-1 year (wild); 1-3 years (captivity)
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Common Rat
1-2 years (wild); 2-3 years (captivity)
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Norway Lemming
1-2 years (wild); 2-3 years (captivity)
3D
House Mouse
1-2 years (wild); 2-5 years (captivity)
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Mongolian Gerbil
2-3 years (wild); 3-5 years (captivity)
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Dark Kangaroo Mouse
2-3 years (wild); 4-5 years (captivity)
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African Dormouse
4 years (wild); 5-6 years (captivity)
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Guinea Pig | Cavy
2-4 years (wild); 5-7 years (captivity)
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Eastern Chipmunk
2-4 years (wild); 6-8 years (captivity)
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Common Degu
1-4 years (wild); 5-9 years (captivity)
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Muskrat
2-4 years (wild); up to 10 years (captivity)
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Ord’s Kangaroo Rat
2-5 years (wild); 5-10 years (captivity)
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California Ground Squirrel
3-6 years (wild); up to 10 years (captivity)
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Nutria | Coypu
4-7 years (wild); up to 12 years (captivity)
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Groundhog
3-6 years (wild); 10-14 years (captivity)
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Capybara
7-10 years (wild); 10-15 years (captivity)
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Lowland Paca
Up to 12 years (wild); 12-16 years (captivity)
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Eastern Gray Squirrel
6-12 years (wild); up to 20 years (captivity)
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Long-Tailed Chinchilla
8-10 years (wild); 10-20 years (captivity)
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Yellow-Bellied Marmot
12-15 years (wild); up to 21 years (captivity)
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North American Beaver
10-15 years (wild); 15-25 years (captivity)
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North American Porcupine
10-15 years (wild); 15-30 years (captivity)
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Eastern Chipmunk

The Eastern Chipmunk (Tamias striatus) is a ground squirrel native to and residing in deciduous forests of eastern North America. It can also be spotted around urban parks or rocky areas with shrub cover. The Eastern Chipmunk is small and has pouched cheeks for storing and carrying food.

It is distinguished by both light and dark brown stripes running along its body with a lighter underbelly and darker tail. Although it does not go into hibernation, the Eastern Chipmunk will sleep for long periods of time and wake every so often to consume the food kept in its burrow.

Eastern Chipmunks have a height of 1.6”-2.4” (4-6 cm), body length between 3”-4.5” (7.6-11.4 cm), and an overall weight in the range of .14-.33 lb (65-150 g). The tail length of an Eastern Chipmunk is 2.75”-4.3” (7-11 cm). Eastern Chipmunks have a typical lifespan of 2-4 years in the wild and 6-8 years in captivity.

Series of measured elevation illustrations of the Eastern Chipmunk
The Eastern Chipmunk (Tamias striatus) is a ground squirrel native to and residing in deciduous forests of eastern North America. It can also be spotted around urban parks or rocky areas with shrub cover. The Eastern Chipmunk is small and has pouched cheeks for storing and carrying food.

Eastern Chipmunks have a height of 1.6”-2.4” (4-6 cm), body length between 3”-4.5” (7.6-11.4 cm), and an overall weight in the range of .14-.33 lb (65-150 g). The tail length of an Eastern Chipmunk is 2.75”-4.3” (7-11 cm). Eastern Chipmunks have a typical lifespan of 2-4 years in the wild and 6-8 years in captivity.

Series of measured elevation illustrations of the Eastern Chipmunk
Eastern Chipmunk
Height:
1.6”-2.4” | 4-6 cm
Width:
Length:
3”-4.5” | 7.6-11.4 cm
Depth:
Weight:
.14-.33 lb | 65-150 g
Area:
Tail Length
2.75”-4.3” | 7-11 cm
Scientific Name
Tamias striatus
Lifespan
2-4 years (wild); 6-8 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Eastern Chipmunk side elevation (standing), front (sitting), side (sitting), side (running)

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Muskrat

The Muskrat, or Ondatra zibethicus, is a rodent of medium size native to North America. It typically inhabits wetlands and marshes, marking its territory with musk-- a strong scented secretion from the glands. The Muskrat makes for an excellent swimmer (even swimming backwards), and to aid itself in this, is equipped with a long, flat tail covered in scales which leaves a trail on the ground when on land.

As the name suggests, the Muskrat resembles that of a large rat, with thick brown-black fur, small facial features, and tiny front feet for digging.

Muskrats have a height of 4.5”-6.7” (11.5-17 cm), body length between 10”-15” (25-38 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 1.5-4.5 lb (.7-2 kg). The tail length of a Muskrat is 7”-11” (18-28 cm). Muskrats have a typical lifespan of 2-4 years in the wild and up to 10 years in captivity.

Set of dimensioned elevation drawings of the Muskrat
The Muskrat is a rodent of medium size native to North America. It typically inhabits wetlands and marshes, marking its territory with musk-- a strong scented secretion from the glands. The Muskrat makes for an excellent swimmer and is aided by its flat scale-covered tail.

Muskrats have a height of 4.5”-6.7” (11.5-17 cm), body length between 10”-15” (25-38 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 1.5-4.5 lb (.7-2 kg). The tail length of a Muskrat is 7”-11” (18-28 cm). Muskrats have a typical lifespan of 2-4 years in the wild and up to 10 years in captivity.

Set of dimensioned elevation drawings of the Muskrat
Muskrat
Height:
4.5”-6.7” | 11.5-17 cm
Width:
Length:
10”-15” | 25-38 cm
Depth:
Weight:
1.5-4.5 lb | .7-2 kg
Area:
Tail Length
7”-11” | 18-28 cm
Scientific Name
Ondatra zibethicus
Lifespan
2-4 years (wild); up to 10 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Muskrat side elevation (standing), side (sitting)

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North American Beaver
Dimensioned size comparison illustration of the North American Beaver compared to an average person

Scientifically known as Castor canadensis and known best for its dam building, the North American Beaver is a semi-aquatic rodent physically distinguished by its broad, flat tail. It is identified as the largest rodent in North America and the second largest in the world just behind the capybara.

The purpose of dam building is to create a deep pond in which the beaver can establish its home. The dam is constructed across streams and consists of a pile of sticks with underwater entrances as the beaver is a skillful swimmer. The home or burrow is then made out of sticks and twigs as well.

North American Beavers have a height of 14.2”-16.9” (36-43 cm), body length between 29”-35” (74-89 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 25-75 lb (11.3-34 kg). The tail length of a North American Beaver is 7.9”-13.8” (20-35 cm). North American Beavers have a typical lifespan of 10-15 years in the wild and up to 15-25 years in captivity.

Collection of scaled drawings of the North American Beaver in various standing poses
Scientifically known as Castor canadensis and known best for its dam building, the North American Beaver is a semi-aquatic rodent physically distinguished by its broad, flat tail. It is identified as the largest rodent in North America and the second largest in the world just behind the capybara.

North American Beavers have a height of 14.2”-16.9” (36-43 cm), body length between 29”-35” (74-89 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 25-75 lb (11.3-34 kg). The tail length of a North American Beaver is 7.9”-13.8” (20-35 cm). North American Beavers have a typical lifespan of 10-15 years in the wild and up to 15-25 years in captivity.

Collection of scaled drawings of the North American Beaver in various standing poses
North American Beaver
Height:
14.2”-16.9” | 36-43 cm
Width:
Length:
29”-35” | 74-89 cm
Depth:
Weight:
25-75 lb | 11.3-34 kg
Area:
Tail Length
7.9”-13.8” | 20-35 cm
Scientific Name
Castor canadensis
Lifespan
10-15 years (wild); 15-25 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

North American Beaver side elevation (standing), front (standing), side (sitting), back (sitting)

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Common Degu

The Common Degu (Octodon degus), or just degu, is a small, social rodent unique to the lowlands of Chile. Active and extremely social during the day unlike the nocturnal rat, the Common Degu lives in burrows underground dug out in large communities of up to 100 rather than individually.

It is physically characterized by yellowish-brown fur, round ears, thin tail, and figure eight-shaped cheek teeth-- the reason behind its scientific name. People are able to keep the Common Degu as a pet, but it is recommended to have more than one as they thrive in colonies.

Common Degus have a height of 5.1”-5.9” (13-15 cm), body length between 9.8”-12.2” (25-31 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 6-10.6 lb (170-300 g). The tail length of a Common Degu is 5”-6” (13-15 cm). Common Degus have a typical lifespan of 1-4 years in the wild and 5-9 years in captivity.

Dimensioned collection of scaled drawings of Common Degu in various poses
The Common Degu (Octodon degus), or just degu, is a small, social rodent unique to the lowlands of Chile. Active and extremely social during the day unlike the nocturnal rat, the Common Degu lives in burrows underground dug out in large communities of up to 100 rather than individually.

Common Degus have a height of 5.1”-5.9” (13-15 cm), body length between 9.8”-12.2” (25-31 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 6-10.6 lb (170-300 g). The tail length of a Common Degu is 5”-6” (13-15 cm). Common Degus have a typical lifespan of 1-4 years in the wild and 5-9 years in captivity.

Dimensioned collection of scaled drawings of Common Degu in various poses
Common Degu
Height:
5.1”-5.9” | 13-15 cm
Width:
Length:
9.8”-12.2” | 25-31 cm
Depth:
Weight:
6-10.6 lb | 170-300 g
Area:
Tail Length
5”-6” | 13-15 cm
Scientific Name
Octodon degus
Lifespan
1-4 years (wild); 5-9 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Common Degu side elevation (standing), front (standing), front (upright)

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Common Rat

The Common Rat, scientifically called Rattus norvegicus, holds multiple monikers such as the brown rat, street rat, and sewer rat. As the name suggests, it is considered one of the better-known rats due to its tendency to inhabit typically urban areas filled with humans. Physically, the common rat is distinguished by its long tail, coarse brown or grey fur, and a larger body size in comparison to others within the rodent family.

Other traits the common rat possesses include perceptive hearing, acute sense of smell, communication through chirping and ultrasonic vocalizations, and the skill of swimming.

Common Rats have a height of 2.4”-3.5” (6-9 cm), body length between 6”-10” (15-25 cm), and an overall weight in the range of .6-1.5 lb (250-700 g). The tail length of a Common Rat is 4.3”-9.4” (11-24 cm). Common Rats have a typical lifespan of 1-2 years in the wild and 2-3 years in captivity.

Series of measured elevation illustrations of the Common Rat
The Common Rat, scientifically called Rattus norvegicus, holds multiple monikers such as the brown rat, street rat, and sewer rat. As the name suggests, it is considered one of the better-known rats due to its tendency to inhabit typically urban areas filled with humans.

Common Rats have a height of 2.4”-3.5” (6-9 cm), body length between 6”-10” (15-25 cm), and an overall weight in the range of .6-1.5 lb (250-700 g). The tail length of a Common Rat is 4.3”-9.4” (11-24 cm). Common Rats have a typical lifespan of 1-2 years in the wild and 2-3 years in captivity.

Series of measured elevation illustrations of the Common Rat
Common Rat
Height:
2.4”-3.5” | 6-9 cm
Width:
Length:
6”-10” | 15-25 cm
Depth:
Weight:
.6-1.5 lb | 250-700 g
Area:
Tail Length
4.3”-9.4” | 11-24 cm
Scientific Name
Rattus norvegicus
Lifespan
1-2 years (wild); 2-3 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Common Rat side elevation (standing), front (standing), side (sitting), front (upright)

Details & Downloads

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