Primates are mammals classified by their large brains (compared to their body size), opposable thumbs, heavier reliance on their sense of sight (full color sight) than smell, and slower development and longer lifespans. Primates are found all over the world, but non-human primates are found primarily in Central and South America, Africa, and Southern Asia. Non-human primates have frequently been used for experimentation due to their similarities to humans. Primates are some of the most social animals and usually form pairs or families. Non-human primates are threatened by human activities, such as, deforestation, forest fragmentation, and primate hunting.

What are primates?

Primates is the biological order that includes lemurs, monkeys, apes, as well as humans. Primates can be found all over the world and have a large brain in comparison to their body size. Primates are divided into 3 groups: prosimians, monkeys of the New World, and monkeys and apes of the Old World.

Why do primates live in social groups?

Most primates live in social groups to provide protection from predators like hyenas as well as to protect their food resources. Individuals in social groups coordinate activities, communicate with each other, and maintain social bonds. It is also easier for them to find a mate while living in a social group.

How do primates acquire food?

Although humans are the only primates that store food, other primate species seek both water and food on a daily basis. For example, chimpanzees and baboons, cooperate within their community to hunt for food. Most primate species are primarily or completely vegetarian. These species tend to search for food within their territory.

Primates Guides
Browse through our curated Primates Guides for additional categorizations, tips, details, variations, styles, and histories of Primates. Guides provide additional insights into the unique properties and shared relationships between elements.
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Aye-Aye
11000
7.3”-9.4” | 18.5-24 cm (All Fours)
6.9”-9.1” | 17.5-23 cm
13”-17” | 33-43 cm
4.4-6 lb | 2-2.7 kg
20-23 years
Aye-Aye
24.000
23.000
43.000
2.700
23.00
11000
GUIDE
3D
Aye-Aye
14.2”-22” | 36-56 cm
6.7”-10.6” | 17-27 cm
17.7”-27.6” | 45-70 cm
22-35 lb | 10-16 kg
20-25 years (wild); 25-30 years (captivity)
Barbary Macaque
56.000
27.000
70.000
16.000
30.00
GUIDE
3D
Barbary Macaque
12.2”-16.1” | 31-41 cm
9”-11.4” | 23-29 cm
20”-26” | 51-66 cm
8.8-17.6 lb | 4-8 kg
15-20 years (wild); 25-33 years (captivity)
Black Howler
41.000
29.000
66.000
8.000
33.00
6100
GUIDE
3D
Black Howler
11”-17.7” | 28-45 cm
5.1”-8.7” | 13-22 cm
13.8”-23.6” | 35-60 cm
7.7-20 lb | 3.5-9 kg
20-30 years (wild); 30-35 years (captivity)
Bonnet Macaque
45.000
22.000
60.000
9.000
35.00
GUIDE
3D
Bonnet Macaque
Bonobo
671800
39”-49” | 99-125 cm (Upright)
10.6”-14.2” | 27-36 cm
27.6”-32.7” | 70-83 cm
60-86 lb | 27-39 kg
20-45 years (wild); 50-58 years (captivity)
Bonobo
125.000
36.000
83.000
39.000
58.00
671800
GUIDE
3D
Bonobo
39.4”-59” | 100-150 cm (Upright)
18.9”-28” | 48-71 cm
31.9”-47.6” | 81-121 cm
110-220 lb | 50-100 kg
35-45 years (wild); 50-60 years (captivity)
Bornean Orangutan
150.000
71.000
121.000
100.000
60.00
16800
GUIDE
3D
Bornean Orangutan
6.3”-9” | 16-23 cm
3.1”-4.5” | 8-11.5 cm
9”-13” | 23-33 cm
1.1-2.2 lb | .5-1 kg
15-21 years (wild); 20-30 years (captivity)
Common Squirrel Monkey
23.000
11.500
33.000
1.000
30.00
3700
GUIDE
3D
Common Squirrel Monkey
7.5”-10.2” | 19-26 cm
5.9”-7.7” | 15-19.5 cm
11.4”-15.4” | 29-39 cm
2.2-2.6 lb | 1-1.2 kg
20-27 years
Coppery Titi
26.000
19.500
39.000
1.200
27.00
250
GUIDE
3D
Coppery Titi
11”-13” | 28-33 cm (All Fours)
9.1”-10.6” | 23-27 cm
14.6”-21.7” | 37-55 cm
11-18.7 lb | 5-8.5 kg
21-30 years
Diademed Sifaka
33.000
27.000
55.000
8.500
30.00
9200
GUIDE
3D
Diademed Sifaka
63”-72” | 160-183 cm (Upright)
25.2”-28” | 64-71 cm
37.4”-47.2” | 95-120 cm
220-460 lb | 100-210 kg
30-40 (wild); 40-60 (captivity)
Eastern Lowland Gorilla
183.000
71.000
120.000
210.000
60.00
4350
GUIDE
3D
Eastern Lowland Gorilla
2.6”-3.1” | 6.5-8 cm (All Fours)
2.4”-2.75” | 6-7 cm
4.7”-5.5” | 12-14 cm
2.1-2.5 oz | .06-.07 kg
6-8 years (wild); 13-18 years (captivity)
Gray Mouse Lemur
8.000
7.000
14.000
0.070
18.00
8600
GUIDE
3D
Gray Mouse Lemur
18.1”-26.4” | 46-67 cm
13”-17.7” | 33-45 cm
19.3”-27.6” | 49-70 cm
22-66 lb | 10-30 kg
20-30 years (wild); 31-38 years (captivity)
Hamadryas Baboon
67.000
45.000
70.000
30.000
38.00
GUIDE
3D
Hamadryas Baboon
Indri
4100
18.5”-20.5” | 47-52 cm (All Fours)
13.4”-15” | 34-38 cm
25.2”-28.3” | 64-72 cm
15.4-22 lb | 7-10 kg
15-22 years (wild); 20-40 years (captivity)
Indri
52.000
38.000
72.000
10.000
40.00
4100
GUIDE
3D
Indri
15.75”-17.7” | 40-45 cm
7.5”-8.3” | 19-21 cm
20.5”-22.4” | 52-57 cm
17.6-26.5 lb | 8-12 kg
22-32 years (wild); 27-39 years (captivity)
Japanese Macaque
45.000
21.000
57.000
12.000
39.00
GUIDE
3D
Japanese Macaque
16.5”-23.2” | 42-59 cm (Upright)
5.9”-8.7” | 15-22 cm
10.6”-14.6” | 27-37 cm (Head to Rear)
9.7-16.8 lb | 4.4-7.6 kg
25-30 years (wild); 35-56 years (captivity)
Lar Gibbon
59.000
22.000
37.000
7.600
56.00
3400
GUIDE
3D
Lar Gibbon
13”-18.1” | 33-46 cm
7.9”-11” | 20-28 cm
16.5”-24” | 42-61 cm
6.6-22 lb | 3-10 kg
20-30 years (wild); 30-35 years (captivity)
Lion-Tailed Macaque
46.000
28.000
61.000
10.000
35.00
GUIDE
3D
Lion-Tailed Macaque
20.5”-35.4” | 52-90 cm
9.4”-16.5” | 24-42 cm
21.7”-37.4” | 55-95 cm
26.5-81.5 lb | 12-37 kg
20-28 years (wild); 32-40 years (captivity)
Mandrill
90.000
42.000
95.000
37.000
40.00
GUIDE
3D
Mandrill
55”-67” | 140-170 cm (Upright)
24”-29.1” | 61-74 cm
37.4”-45.3” | 95-115 cm
154-419 lb | 70-190 kg
35-40 years (wild); 40-50 years (captivity)
Mountain Gorilla
170.000
74.000
115.000
190.000
50.00
27250
GUIDE
3D
Mountain Gorilla
10.2”-14.2” | 26-36 cm
5.1”-7.1” | 13-18 cm
13”-17.7” | 33-45 cm
4.4-8.8 lb | 2-4 kg
30-37 years (wild); 45-54 years (captivity)
Panamanian White-Faced Capuchin
36.000
18.000
45.000
4.000
54.00
1900
GUIDE
3D
Panamanian White-Faced Capuchin
16.5”-29.5” | 42-75 cm
5.5”-9.8” | 14-25 cm
19.3”-34.6” | 49-88 cm
14.3-27.5 lb | 6.5-12.5 kg
15-24 years (wild); 20-30 years (captivity)
Patas Monkey
75.000
25.000
88.000
12.500
30.00
GUIDE
3D
Patas Monkey
16.1”-22.8” | 41-58 cm
8.7”-11.4” | 22-29 cm
20.9”-29.9” | 53-76 cm
15.4-50.7 lb | 7-23 kg
15-20 years (wild); 17-23 years (captivity)
Proboscis Monkey
58.000
29.000
76.000
23.000
23.00
GUIDE
3D
Proboscis Monkey
3.3”-4.5” | 8.5-11.5 cm (All Fours)
2.75”-3.5” | 7-9 cm
7.5”-9.8” | 19-25 cm
.7-1.3 lb | .3-.6 kg
15-17 years (wild); 16-20 years (captivity)
Pygmy Slow Loris
11.500
9.000
25.000
0.600
20.00
1500
GUIDE
3D
Pygmy Slow Loris
2.75”-5.9” | 7-15 cm (All Fours)
1.6”-3.1” | 4-8 cm
4.7”-9.8” | 12-25 cm
2.8-6 oz | .08-.17 kg
15-18 years (wild); 17-22 years (captivity)
Red Slender Loris
15.000
8.000
25.000
0.170
22.00
100
GUIDE
3D
Red Slender Loris
13”-20.9” | 33-53 cm
7.9”-13” | 20-33 cm
16.5”-26” | 42-66 cm
15.4-19.8 lb | 7-9 kg
25-30 years (wild); 33-46 years (captivity)
Red-Faced Spider Monkey
53.000
33.000
66.000
9.000
46.00
1900
GUIDE
3D
Red-Faced Spider Monkey
16.1”-22.4” | 41-57 cm
7.9”-11” | 20-28 cm
18.5”-25.2” | 47-64 cm
11.7-17 lb | 5.3-7.7 kg
20-30 years (wild); 25-40 years (captivity)
Rhesus Macaque
57.000
28.000
64.000
7.700
40.00
GUIDE
3D
Rhesus Macaque
9.1”-10.2” | 23-26 cm (All Fours)
5.5”-6.7” | 14-17 cm
15.4”-18.1” | 39-46 cm
4.9-6.6 lb | 2.2-3 kg
16-19 years (wild); 24-33 years (captivity)
Ring-Tailed Lemur
26.000
17.000
46.000
3.000
33.00
3600
GUIDE
3D
Ring-Tailed Lemur
Siamang
36600
29.1”-35.4” | 74-90 cm (Upright)
12.2”-14.6” | 31-37 cm
18.9”-23.6” | 48-60 cm (Head to Rear)
22-31 lb | 10-14 kg
25-30 years (wild); 30-43 years (captivity)
Siamang
90.000
37.000
60.000
14.000
43.00
36600
GUIDE
3D
Siamang
43.3”-59” | 110-150 cm (Upright)
19.3”-26” | 49-66 cm
31.1”-42.5” | 79-108 cm
110-198 lb | 50-90 kg
30-40 years (wild); 34-58 years (captivity)
Sumatran Orangutan
150.000
66.000
108.000
90.000
58.00
12500
GUIDE
3D
Sumatran Orangutan
10.2”-16.5” | 26-42 cm
5.5”-9.4” | 14-24 cm
13”-22” | 33-56 cm
4.4-11 lb | 2-5 kg
15-25 years (wild); 40-50 years (captivity)
Tufted Capuchin
42.000
24.000
56.000
5.000
50.00
2450
GUIDE
3D
Tufted Capuchin
13.8”-20” | 35-51 cm
7.5”-11” | 19-28 cm
18.1”-28.3” | 46-72 cm
9.25-19.8 lb | 4.2-9 kg
15-25 years
Venezuelan Red Howler
51.000
28.000
72.000
9.000
25.00
1030
GUIDE
3D
Venezuelan Red Howler
39”-59” | 99-150 cm (Upright)
13”-18.1” | 33-46 cm
27.2”-37.8” | 69-96 cm
88-104 lb | 40-47 kg
15-25 years (wild); 30-50 years (captivity)
Western Chimpanzee
150.000
46.000
96.000
47.000
50.00
900
GUIDE
3D
Western Chimpanzee
Japanese Macaque (Macaca fuscata)
Comparison drawing of the Japanese Macaque compared to similar Old World Monkey species at scale

The Japanese Macaque, or snow monkey (Macaca fuscata) is a primate native to Japan. They are set apart by their pink posteriors and thick, gray or brown fur, which keeps them warm through the winter. They are omnivores, eating everything from fungi to crayfish, and have cheek pouches that extend down their necks to store food. They live in the forests of Honshi, Shikoku, and Kyushu islands, and a few smaller islands. They earned their nickname, ‘snow monkey’ because they thrive in the snow. They make snowballs for fun and bathe in hot springs heated by volcanos to keep warm during the harsh winters.

Japanese Macaques have a head-body length of 20.5”-22.4” (52-57 cm), tail length of 2.75”-3.9” (7-10 cm), height on all fours of 15.75”-17.7” (40-45 cm), and body width between 7.5”-8.3” (19-21 cm). The typical weight of the Japanese Macaque is in the range of 17.6-26.5 lb (8-12 kg). Japanese Macaques have lifespans between 22-32 years in the wild and 27-39 years in captivity.

Series of dimensioned drawings of the Japanese Macaque in front and side views
The Japanese Macaque, or snow monkey (Macaca fuscata) is a primate native to Japan. They are set apart by their pink posteriors and thick, gray or brown fur, which keeps them warm through the winter. They are omnivores, eating everything from fungi to crayfish, and have extended cheek pouches.

Japanese Macaques have a head-body length of 20.5”-22.4” (52-57 cm), tail length of 2.75”-3.9” (7-10 cm), height on all fours of 15.75”-17.7” (40-45 cm), and body width between 7.5”-8.3” (19-21 cm). The typical weight of the Japanese Macaque is in the range of 17.6-26.5 lb (8-12 kg). Japanese Macaques have lifespans between 22-32 years in the wild and 27-39 years in captivity.

Series of dimensioned drawings of the Japanese Macaque in front and side views
Japanese Macaque (Macaca fuscata)
Height:
15.75”-17.7” | 40-45 cm
Width:
7.5”-8.3” | 19-21 cm
Length:
20.5”-22.4” | 52-57 cm
Depth:
Weight:
17.6-26.5 lb | 8-12 kg
Area:

Tail Length: 2.75”-3.9” | 7-10 cm

Scientific Name
Macaca fuscata
Lifespan
22-32 years (wild); 27-39 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Japanese Macaque side elevation (assorted), front

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Red Slender Loris (Loris tardigradus)
Scale illustration of an average Red Slender Loris compared to other species of Lemuriforms

The Red Slender Loris (Loris tardigradus) is a small primate native to Sri Lanka. They have huge, brown eyes and small, mouse-like ears. They are carnivores, exclusively living off their prey, including geckos, lizards, dragonflies, and other insects. Their digestive system is so powerful that it can process poison, allowing them to eat toxic insects. They live in the southwestern rainforests of Sri Lanka, sticking to the treetops rather than the forest floor. Like many other lorises, the red slender loris is nocturnal, and their big eyes help them see at night. They typically move slowly and noiselessly, but can climb rapidly when motivated.

Red Slender Loris' have a body length of 4.7”-9.8” (12-25 cm), height on all fours of 2.75”-5.9” (7-15 cm), and body width between 1.6”-3.1” (4-8 cm). The typical weight of the Red Slender Loris is in the range of 2.8-6 oz (.08-.17 kg). Red Slender Loris' have lifespans between 15-18 years in the wild and 17-22 years in captivity.

Group of measured illustrations of the Red Slender Loris seen from the front and side
The Red Slender Loris (Loris tardigradus) is a small primate native to Sri Lanka. They have huge, brown eyes and small, mouse-like ears. They are carnivores, exclusively living off their prey, including geckos, lizards, dragonflies, and other insects.

Red Slender Loris' have a body length of 4.7”-9.8” (12-25 cm), height on all fours of 2.75”-5.9” (7-15 cm), and body width between 1.6”-3.1” (4-8 cm). The typical weight of the Red Slender Loris is in the range of 2.8-6 oz (.08-.17 kg). Red Slender Loris' have lifespans between 15-18 years in the wild and 17-22 years in captivity.

Group of measured illustrations of the Red Slender Loris seen from the front and side
Red Slender Loris (Loris tardigradus)
Height:
2.75”-5.9” | 7-15 cm (All Fours)
Width:
1.6”-3.1” | 4-8 cm
Length:
4.7”-9.8” | 12-25 cm
Depth:
Weight:
2.8-6 oz | .08-.17 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Loris tardigradus
Lifespan
15-18 years (wild); 17-22 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Red Slender Loris side elevation (assorted), front

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Barbary Macaque (Macaca sylvanus)
Comparison drawing of the Barbary Macaque compared to similar Old World Monkey species at scale

The Barbary Macaque (Macaca sylvanus) is a medium sized primate native to northern Africa. They are distinguishable by their light brown heads and even lighter bodies, and their lack of a visible tail. The barbary macaque is the only macaque not native to Asia. Before the Ice Age, they were found in most of Europe, and barbary macaque remains from 200 BC have even been found in Northern Ireland. There is also a population of barbary macaques living in Gibraltar. They are descendants of the north African population, and are thought to have been brought to Gibraltar by the Moors between 711 and 1492.

Barbary Macaques have a head-body length of 17.7”-27.6” (45-70 cm), tail length of .4”-.8” (1-2 cm), height on all fours of 14.2”-22” (36-56 cm), and body width between 6.7”-10.6” (17-27 cm). The typical weight of the Barbary Macaque is in the range of 22-35 lb (10-16 kg). Barbary Macaques have lifespans between 20-25 years in the wild and 25-30 years in captivity.

Series of dimensioned drawings of the Barbary Macaque in front and side views
The Barbary Macaque (Macaca sylvanus) is a medium sized primate native to northern Africa. They are distinguishable by their light brown heads and even lighter bodies, and their lack of a visible tail. The barbary macaque is the only macaque not native to Asia.

Barbary Macaques have a head-body length of 17.7”-27.6” (45-70 cm), tail length of .4”-.8” (1-2 cm), height on all fours of 14.2”-22” (36-56 cm), and body width between 6.7”-10.6” (17-27 cm). The typical weight of the Barbary Macaque is in the range of 22-35 lb (10-16 kg). Barbary Macaques have lifespans between 20-25 years in the wild and 25-30 years in captivity.

Series of dimensioned drawings of the Barbary Macaque in front and side views
Barbary Macaque (Macaca sylvanus)
Height:
14.2”-22” | 36-56 cm
Width:
6.7”-10.6” | 17-27 cm
Length:
17.7”-27.6” | 45-70 cm
Depth:
Weight:
22-35 lb | 10-16 kg
Area:

Tail Length: .4”-.8” | 1-2 cm

Scientific Name
Macaca sylvanus
Lifespan
20-25 years (wild); 25-30 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Barbary Macaque side elevation (assorted), front

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Aye-Aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis)
Comparison drawing of the Aye-Aye compared to similar Lemuriform species at scale

The Aye-Aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis) is a species of lemur native to Madagascar. They are known as one of the strangest looking primates, bearing little resemblance to apes or monkeys and far more to bats. Their large ears and even longer claws are remarkable, but their most distinguishing feature is their bushy tail. Aye-ayes love eating insects, which they find using their large ears to tap wood for hollow parts, and then use their claws to dig into the log and scoop out their prey. They are the largest nocturnal primate, and the only known primate that hunts using echolocation. In Madagascar they are considered bad luck, similar to a black cat in the US.

Aye-Ayes have a body length of 13”-17” (33-43 cm), tail length of 17.7”-23.6” (45-60 cm), height on all fours of 7.3”-9.4” (18.5-24 cm), and body width between 6.9”-9.1” (17.5-23 cm). The typical weight of the Aye-Aye is in the range of 4.4-6 lb (2-2.7 kg). Aye-Ayes have lifespans between 20-23 years.

Series of dimensioned drawings of the Aye-Aye in front and side views
The Aye-Aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis) is a species of lemur native to Madagascar. They are known as one of the strangest looking primates, bearing little resemblance to apes or monkeys and far more to bats. Their large ears and even longer claws are remarkable, but they also have a bushy tail.

Aye-Ayes have a body length of 13”-17” (33-43 cm), tail length of 17.7”-23.6” (45-60 cm), height on all fours of 7.3”-9.4” (18.5-24 cm), and body width between 6.9”-9.1” (17.5-23 cm). The typical weight of the Aye-Aye is in the range of 4.4-6 lb (2-2.7 kg). Aye-Ayes have lifespans between 20-23 years.

Series of dimensioned drawings of the Aye-Aye in front and side views
Aye-Aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis)
Height:
7.3”-9.4” | 18.5-24 cm (All Fours)
Width:
6.9”-9.1” | 17.5-23 cm
Length:
13”-17” | 33-43 cm
Depth:
Weight:
4.4-6 lb | 2-2.7 kg
Area:

Tail Length: 17.7”-23.6” | 45-60 cm

Scientific Name
Daubentonia madagascariensis
Lifespan
20-23 years

Drawings include:

Aye-Aye side elevation (assorted), front

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Hamadryas Baboon (Papio hamadryas)
Scale illustration of an average Hamadryas Baboon compared to other species of Old World Monkeys

The Hamadryas Baboon (Papio Hamadryas) is a species of primate native to eastern Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. They are the northernmost baboons in the world. The males of the species are nearly twice the size of the females, and are identifiable by the males’ silver-white cape and pink faces. They live in troops of hundreds of baboons, and forage for plants together. They’re highly social, and groom and even comfort each other every day. They sleep in high places, such as cliff sides, for security. In ancient Egypt they were worshiped and nicknamed the ”sacred baboon”.

Hamadryas Baboons have a head-body length of 19.3”-27.6” (49-70 cm), tail length of 14.6”-23.6” (37-60 cm), height on all fours of 18.1”-26.4” (46-67 cm), and body width between 13”-17.7” (33-45 cm). The typical weight of the Hamadryas Baboon is in the range of 22-66 lb (10-30 kg). Hamadryas Baboons have lifespans between 20-30 years in the wild and 31-38 years in captivity.

Group of measured illustrations of the Hamadryas Baboon seen from the front and side
The Hamadryas Baboon (Papio Hamadryas) is a species of primate native to eastern Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. They are the northernmost baboons in the world. The males of the species are nearly twice the size of the females, and are identifiable by the males’ silver-white cape and pink faces.

Hamadryas Baboons have a head-body length of 19.3”-27.6” (49-70 cm), tail length of 14.6”-23.6” (37-60 cm), height on all fours of 18.1”-26.4” (46-67 cm), and body width between 13”-17.7” (33-45 cm). The typical weight of the Hamadryas Baboon is in the range of 22-66 lb (10-30 kg). Hamadryas Baboons have lifespans between 20-30 years in the wild and 31-38 years in captivity.

Group of measured illustrations of the Hamadryas Baboon seen from the front and side
Hamadryas Baboon (Papio hamadryas)
Height:
18.1”-26.4” | 46-67 cm
Width:
13”-17.7” | 33-45 cm
Length:
19.3”-27.6” | 49-70 cm
Depth:
Weight:
22-66 lb | 10-30 kg
Area:

Tail Length: 14.6”-23.6” | 37-60 cm

Scientific Name
Papio hamadryas
Lifespan
20-30 years (wild); 31-38 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Hamadryas Baboon side elevation (assorted), front

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