Extinct Animals

Extinct Animals

Description
Description

Extinct animals are species that once roamed the earth but no longer exist. This irreversible loss can result from natural events like climatic shifts, volcanic eruptions, or asteroid impacts, as well as human activities such as habitat destruction, overhunting, and pollution. Their habitats were as diverse as their forms, ranging from oceans and forests to plains and mountains. Over millions of years, these animals evolved unique adaptations to their environments. Iconic examples include the mammoths of the ice ages and the dodo bird of Mauritius. The study of these creatures, primarily through fossils, provides invaluable insights into Earth's history and the consequences of environmental changes.

Anatomy
Anatomy

The anatomy of extinct animals was as diverse as the species themselves. Dinosaurs like the T-Rex had massive, powerful bodies and sharp teeth for hunting, while the gentle, long-necked sauropods grazed on high tree leaves. The dodo, a flightless bird, had stout legs and a robust beak, evolved for a life on the ground. Mammoths, resembling modern elephants, bore long, curved tusks and thick fur coats to survive the ice age chill. Although we can't know for sure, it's unlikely that extinct animals had complex speech, but they would have communicated through sounds, gestures, and scents, much like today's animals. Their senses were adapted to their environments, whether that meant keen eyesight for spotting prey or sensitive hearing to detect predators.

Human Interaction
Human Interaction

Humans have long been fascinated by extinct animals, often depicted in cave paintings and later in literature and film. The "Jurassic Park" series brought dinosaurs into pop culture, igniting imaginations about these ancient creatures. Our relationship has been both awe-inspiring and cautionary; some species like the dodo became extinct partly due to human activities.

Today, the study of fossils and extinct animals informs conservation efforts, helping us understand past biodiversity and ecosystem changes. Museums and educational programs aim to preserve this knowledge, fostering appreciation and a sense of responsibility towards preventing further extinctions in the current biodiversity crisis.

Common Questions
Common Questions
What causes animals to go extinct?

The factors that cause animals to go extinct are mainly the loss and degradation of habitat which is mainly due to deforestation. Other causes for animals going extinct are exploitation through hunting and overfishing, invasive species, and climate change. Plastic pollution and emerging diseases are also factors that play a role in the extinction of animals.

Can extinct animals be brought back?

Extinct animals have not successfully been brought back as of today. Scientists need to sequence its genome and then edit the DNA of a close living relative to match it. Afterwards, they would need to make embryos with the revised genome and have a surrogate mother carry them.

Which animals have gone extinct because of climate change?

Animals that have gone extinct because of climate change include the golden toad and the north Atlantic cod is threatened. The staghorn coral and orange-spotted filefish have also had their population numbers affected by the effects of climate change. It is up to humans to make the necessary changes and help endangered animal species.

Animals

* Under Development *

9.5’-16.1’ | 2.9-4.9 m
3.3’-5.25’ | 1-1.6 m
26’-43’ | 7.9-13.1 m
3,300-5,070 lb | 1,497-2,300 kg
25-30 years
Allosaurus
490.000
160.000
1310.000
2300.000
30.00
199000
GUIDE
3D
Allosaurus
7’-8.2’ | 2.15-2.5 m
3.4’-4.4’ | 1.05-1.35 m
30’-33' | 9.14-10 m
5,700-6,600 lb | 2,585-2,994 kg
25-35 years
Amargasaurus
250.000
135.000
1000.000
2994.000
35.00
32000
GUIDE
3D
Amargasaurus
93.7”-100.8” | 238-256 cm
46.9”-51.2” | 119-130 cm
113”-123” | 286-312 cm
3300-3500 lb | 1500-1590 kg
14-16 years
Ancient Bison
256.000
130.000
312.000
1590.000
16.00
1750
GUIDE
3D
Ancient Bison
5'6" | 1.67 m
16' | 4.85 m
Ankylosaurus
167.000
485.000
66000
GUIDE
3D
Ankylosaurus
17.1’-18.7’ | 5.2-5.7 m
6.9’-7.5’ | 2.1-2.3 m
69’-75’ | 21-23 m
36,000-49,000 lb | 16,330-22,226 kg
70-100 years
Apatosaurus
570.000
230.000
2300.000
22226.000
100.00
87000
GUIDE
3D
Apatosaurus
5.5”-7.1” | 14-18 cm
1.4”-2” | 3.5-5 cm
1.3’-1.6’ | .4-.5 m
1.8-2.2 lb | .82-1 kg
Archaeopteryx
18.000
5.000
50.000
1.000
175000
GUIDE
3D
Archaeopteryx
39.4’-45.9’ | 12-14 m
12.5’-14.8’ | 3.8-4.5 m
98’-115’ | 30-35 m
110,000-220,000 lb | 49,895-99,790 kg
35-45 years
Argentinosaurus
1400.000
450.000
3500.000
99790.000
45.00
114000
GUIDE
3D
Argentinosaurus
Auroch
32800
61.4”-74” | 156-188 cm
24.8”-28.7” | 63-73 cm
105”-128” | 267-325 cm
1550-3300 lb | 700-1500 kg
25-30 years
Auroch
188.000
73.000
325.000
1500.000
30.00
32800
GUIDE
3D
Auroch
Baiji
19800
11”-20” | 27-52 cm
13”-24” | 32-61 cm
4.5’-8.5’ | 1.37-2.59 m
287-375 lb | 130-170 kg
24-30 years
Baiji
52.000
61.000
259.000
170.000
30.00
19800
GUIDE
3D
Baiji
50”-61” | 127-155 cm
13.4”-15.75” | 34-40 cm
61”-94.5” | 155-190 cm
265-441 lb | 120-200 kg
15-22 years
Bluebuck
155.000
40.000
190.000
200.000
22.00
4150
GUIDE
3D
Bluebuck
41’-49.2’ | 12.5-15 m (Overall)
10.2’-12.5’ | 3.1-3.8 m
59’-72.2’ | 18-22 m
62,400-103,400 lb | 28,300-46,900 kg
80-100 years
Brachiosaurus
1500.000
380.000
2200.000
46900.000
100.00
291000
GUIDE
3D
Brachiosaurus
26.6’-28.9’ | 8.1-8.8 m
6.6’-7.4’ | 2-2.25 m
69’-75’ | 21-23 m
34,000-50,000 lb | 15,422-22,680 kg
80-100 years
Brontosaurus
880.000
225.000
2300.000
22680.000
100.00
213000
GUIDE
3D
Brontosaurus
4’7”-5’7” | 1.4-1.7 m
8’8”-11’6” | 2.7-3.5 m
500-1300 lb | 227-590 kg
Cave Bear
170.000
350.000
590.000
13000
GUIDE
3D
Cave Bear
3’-4.3’ | .9-1.3 m
6.3”-10.2” | 16-26 cm
6.6’-9.8’ | 2-3 m
33-55 lb | 15-25 kg
Coelophysis
130.000
26.000
300.000
25.000
22000
GUIDE
3D
Coelophysis
15.1’-17.4’ | 4.6-5.3 m
3.3’-3.9’ | 1-1.2 m
30’-33' | 9.14-10 m
6,000-11,000 lb | 2,722-4,990 kg
60-70 years
Corythosaurus
530.000
120.000
1000.000
4990.000
70.00
18000
GUIDE
3D
Corythosaurus
4.25’-4.58’ | 1.3-1.4 m
2.4’-2.5’ | .73-.76 m
5.58’-5.91’ | 1.7-1.8 m
440-550 lb | 200-250 kg
68 years (minimum)
Cyprus Dwarf Elephant
140.000
76.000
180.000
250.000
68.00
70
GUIDE
3D
Cyprus Dwarf Elephant
2.8’-4.75’ | .85-1.45 m
9.4”-16.5” | 24-42 cm
9’-16’ | 2.74-4.88 m
160-220 lb | 73-100 kg
Deinonychus
145.000
42.000
488.000
100.000
99000
GUIDE
3D
Deinonychus
5.7’-7.4’ | 1.75-2.25 m
15.75”-23.6” | 40-60 cm
16’-20’ | 4.88-6.1 m
650-1,000 lb | 295-454 kg
Dilophosaurus
225.000
60.000
610.000
454.000
167000
GUIDE
3D
Dilophosaurus
26.6’-28.9’ | 8.1-8.8 m
6.1’-6.6’ | 1.85-2 m
80’-85’ | 24.4-26 m
60,000-160,000 lb | 27,215-72,575 kg
70-80 years
Diplodocus
880.000
200.000
2600.000
72575.000
80.00
240000
GUIDE
3D
Diplodocus
7.2’-11.2’ | 2.2-3.4 m
18.5”-28.3” | 47-72 cm
13’-20’ | 3.96-6.1 m
500-970 lb | 227-440 kg
10-20 years
Gallimimus
340.000
72.000
610.000
440.000
20.00
52000
GUIDE
3D
Gallimimus
29.5”-33.5” | 75-85 cm
8.9”-10.8” | 22.5-27.5 cm
35.4”-40.9” | 90-104 cm
11-15.4 lb | 5-7 kg
20-25 years
Great Auk
85.000
27.500
104.000
7.000
25.00
25600
GUIDE
3D
Great Auk
11.5’-15.75’ | 3.5-4.8 m
3.9’-5.25’ | 1.2-1.6 m
29.5’-39.4’ | 9-12 m
8,000-11,000 lb | 3,629-4,990 kg
25-40 years
Iguanodon
480.000
160.000
1200.000
4990.000
40.00
85000
GUIDE
3D
Iguanodon
6’6”-7’ | 198-213 cm
9’10”-10’6” | 3-3.2 m
1190-1543 lb | 540-700 kg
10-15 years
Irish Elk
213.000
320.000
700.000
15.00
19000
GUIDE
3D
Irish Elk
63”-67” | 160-170 cm
17.7”-19.3” | 45-49 cm
198-220 lb | 90-100 kg
Kumimanu
170.000
49.000
100.000
750
GUIDE
3D
Kumimanu
14.4’-19.4’ | 4.4-5.9 m
4.6’-6.6’ | 1.4-2 m
29.5’-39.4’ | 9-12 m
8,000-11,200 lb | 3,629-5,080 kg
25-30 years
Lambeosaurus
590.000
200.000
1200.000
5080.000
30.00
13000
GUIDE
3D
Lambeosaurus
8.2’-9.2’ | 2.5-2.8 m
3.3’-3.9’ | 1-1.2 m
26.2’-29.5’ | 8-9 m
5,600-10,000 lb | 2,540-4,536 kg
Maiasaura
280.000
120.000
900.000
4536.000
25000
GUIDE
3D
Maiasaura
20.3’-37.4’ | 6.2-11.4 m
5.25’-9.8’ | 1.6-3 m
49.2’-85.3’ | 15-26 m
60,000-176,000 lb | 27,216-79,832 kg
35-45 years
Mamenchisaurus
1140.000
300.000
2600.000
79832.000
45.00
15000
GUIDE
3D
Mamenchisaurus
6.4’-7.1’ | 1.95-2.15 m
19.7”-27.6” | 50-70 cm
11.5’-12.5’ | 3.5-3.8 m
220-370 lb | 100-168 kg
Ornithomimus
215.000
70.000
380.000
168.000
11000
GUIDE
3D
Ornithomimus
4.3’-7.2’ | 1.3-2.2 m
19.7”-33.5” | 50-85 cm
9.8’-16.4’ | 3-5 m
815-992 lb | 370-450 kg
Pachycephalosaurus
220.000
85.000
500.000
450.000
101000
GUIDE
3D
Pachycephalosaurus
3.9”-4.7” | 10-12 cm (Hanging)
9.8”-11.8” | 25-30 cm (Wingspan)
2.75”-3.4” | 7-8.6 cm (Body)
.25-.35 oz | 7-10 g
Unknown
Palaeochiropteryx
12.000
30.000
8.600
0.010
140
GUIDE
3D
Palaeochiropteryx
14.4’-18.4’ | 4.4-5.6 m
3.9’-4.9’ | 1.2-1.5 m
29.5’-36’ | 9-11 m
6,000-8,000 lb | 2,722-3,629 kg
55-70 years
Parasaurolophus
560.000
150.000
1100.000
3629.000
70.00
101000
GUIDE
3D
Parasaurolophus
11.5' | 3.5 m
46' | 14 m
Plesiosaurus
350.000
1400.000
14000
GUIDE
3D
Plesiosaurus
19.7”-23.6” | 50-60 cm
13.8”-19.7” | 35-50 cm
4.9’-5.9’ | 1.5-1.8 m
350-400 lb | 159-181 kg
Protoceratops
60.000
50.000
180.000
181.000
29000
GUIDE
3D
Protoceratops
19.5' | 6 m
6' | 1.83 m
Pterodactyl
600.000
183.000
116000
GUIDE
3D
Pterodactyl
Quagga
102300
53.1”-57” | 135-145 cm
65”-70.9” | 165-180 cm
551-661 lb | 250-300 kg
20-40 years
Quagga
145.000
180.000
300.000
40.00
102300
GUIDE
3D
Quagga
6.7”-7.5” | 17-19 cm
4.7”-5.5” | 12-14 cm
20.5”-22.4” | 52-57 cm
1.5-3.5 lb | .7-1.6 kg
6-11 years
Sea Mink
19.000
14.000
57.000
1.600
11.00
3000
GUIDE
3D
Sea Mink
4’-6’ | 1.22-1.83 m
6’9”-9’6” | 2.06-2.9 m
650-2200 lb | 295-998 kg
Short-Faced Bear
183.000
290.000
998.000
16700
GUIDE
3D
Short-Faced Bear
20’-25.6’ | 6.1-7.8 m (Overall)
5.25’-6.9’ | 1.6-2.1 m
46’-59’ | 14-18 m
14,100-16,300 lb | 6,400-7,400 kg
25-30 years
Spinosaurus
780.000
210.000
1800.000
7400.000
30.00
507000
GUIDE
3D
Spinosaurus
10.8’-14.8’ | 3.3-4.5 m (Overall)
3.9’-5.9’ | 1.2-1.8 m
21.3’-30’ | 6.5-9.1 m
6,800-8,400 lb | 3,100-3,800 kg
75-100 years
Stegosaurus
450.000
180.000
910.000
3800.000
100.00
392000
GUIDE
3D
Stegosaurus
6.5’-7.4’ | 200-225 cm
6.5’-7.4’ | 200-225 cm
26’-30’ | 7.9-9.1 m
16,000-20,000 lb | 7,260-9,070 kg
50-80 years
Steller's Sea Cow
225.000
225.000
910.000
9070.000
80.00
4700
GUIDE
3D
Steller's Sea Cow
7.2’-8.9’ | 2.2-2.7 m
3.6’-4.3’ | 1.1-1.3 m
16.4’-19.7’ | 5-6 m
5,400-6,000 lb | 2,450-2,722 kg
35-45 years
Styracosaurus
270.000
130.000
600.000
2722.000
45.00
39000
GUIDE
3D
Styracosaurus
Tarpan
27100
54.3”-59.8” | 138-152 cm
70.9”-78.7” | 180-200 cm
661-882 lb | 300-400 kg
25-30 years
Tarpan
152.000
200.000
400.000
30.00
27100
GUIDE
3D
Tarpan
1.6’-3.3’ | .5-1 m
5.9”-11.8” | 15-30 cm
3.9’-8.2’ | 1.2-2.5 m
24-49 lb | 11-22 kg
Thecodontosaurus
100.000
30.000
250.000
22.000
1500
GUIDE
3D
Thecodontosaurus
20”-27” | 51-69 cm
39”-51” | 99-130 cm
35-65 lb | 16-29 kg
5-7 years (wild); up to 8-11 years (captivity)
Thylacine
69.000
130.000
29.000
11.00
44000
GUIDE
3D
Thylacine
10.8’-12.5’ | 3.3-3.8 m
6.6’-7.5’ | 2-2.3 m
26.2’-29.5’ | 8-9 m
11,000-19,800 lb | 5,000-9,000 kg
40-70 years
Triceratops
380.000
230.000
900.000
9000.000
70.00
617000
GUIDE
3D
Triceratops
6.9’-8.2’ | 2.1-2.5 m
3.3’-3.9’ | 1-1.2 m
19.7’-23’ | 6-7 m
5,600-8,000 lb | 2,540-3,629 kg
20-25 years
Tuojiangosaurus
250.000
120.000
700.000
3629.000
25.00
4200
GUIDE
3D
Tuojiangosaurus
15.75’-17.7’ | 4.8-5.4 m
5.25’-6.2’ | 1.6-1.9 m
36’-40’ | 11-12.2 m
12,600-15,400 lb | 5,7000-7,000 kg
20-28 years
Tyrannosaurus | T-Rex
540.000
190.000
12200.000
7000.000
28.00
715000
GUIDE
3D
Tyrannosaurus | T-Rex
25”-39” | 65-100 cm
6.3”-10.2” | 16-26 cm
22-66 lb | 10-30 kg
Waimanu
100.000
26.000
30.000
540
GUIDE
3D
Waimanu
8.5’-11.17’ | 2.6-3.4 m
4.59’-6.23’ | 1.4-1.9 m
9.19’-12.47’ | 2.8-3.8 m
13,205-17,593 lb | 5,990-7,980 kg
60-80 years
Woolly Mammoth
340.000
190.000
380.000
7980.000
80.00
146900
GUIDE
3D
Woolly Mammoth
Waimanu (Waimanu manneringi)
Measured comparison illustration of the size of a Waimanu to a typical person and similar penguins

Waimanu (Waimanu manneringi) is thought to be among the largest penguins to have inhabited this planet. It lived during the Paleocene period. The fossils were discovered in the Basal Waipara Greensand in New Zealand and are currently used to understand the evolution of birds. Waimanu was primitive, having long narrow beaks with slit-like nostrils, shorter and stubby feet, while the shape of the limb bone ensured an upright posture. Its bones were less flattened compared to modern penguins and legs larger than modern penguins. However, the head looked more like a cormorant than a penguin, and it could fold its wings.

Waimanus had an overall height between 25”-39” (65-100 cm) and body width of 6.3”-10.2” (16-26 cm). The typical weight of the Waimanu was in the range of 22-66 lb (10-30 kg).

Scaled collection of drawings of Waimanu in front and side poses
Waimanu (Waimanu manneringi) is thought to be among the largest penguins to have inhabited this planet. It lived during the Paleocene period. The fossils were discovered in the Basal Waipara Greensand in New Zealand and are currently used to understand the evolution of birds.

Waimanus had an overall height between 25”-39” (65-100 cm) and body width of 6.3”-10.2” (16-26 cm). The typical weight of the Waimanu was in the range of 22-66 lb (10-30 kg).

Scaled collection of drawings of Waimanu in front and side poses
Waimanu (Waimanu manneringi)
Height:
25”-39” | 65-100 cm
Width:
6.3”-10.2” | 16-26 cm
Length:
Depth:
Weight:
22-66 lb | 10-30 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Waimanu manneringi
Lifespan

Drawings include:

Waimanu side elevations, front, back

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Pachycephalosaurus (Pachycephalosaurus wyomingensis)
Size comparison drawing of the Pachycephalosaurus compared to a person

The Pachycephalosaurus was a bipedal herbivorous dinosaur that belonged to the genus of pachycephalosaurids. It lived during the Late Cretaceous Period (Maastrichtian stage) in North America, and remains have been excavated in Montana, South Dakota, Wyoming, Alaska, and Alberta. The Greek translation of its name means ”thick-headed lizard” refers to the Pachycephalosaurus’s extremely thick skull roof. Other physical features were a thick neck, short forelimbs, long hindlimbs, a bulky body, and a heavy tail held rigid by ossified tendons. It has been commonly hypothesized that the Pachycephalosaurus used their skulls in combat, similar to the bighorn sheep or musk oxen’s use of their heads to transmit stress during ramming, but this has been disputed in recent years.

The Pachycephalosaurus had an overall length between 9.8’-16.4’ (3-5 m), standing height of 4.3’-7.2’ (1.3-2.2 m), and body width of 19.7”-33.5” (50-85 cm). The weight of the Pachycephalosaurus was between 815-992 lb (370-450 kg).

Dimensioned series of illustrations of the Pachycephalosaurus
The Pachycephalosaurus was a bipedal herbivorous dinosaur that belonged to the genus of pachycephalosaurids. It lived during the Late Cretaceous Period (Maastrichtian stage) in North America, and remains have been excavated in Montana, South Dakota, Wyoming, Alaska, and Alberta.

The Pachycephalosaurus had an overall length between 9.8’-16.4’ (3-5 m), standing height of 4.3’-7.2’ (1.3-2.2 m), and body width of 19.7”-33.5” (50-85 cm). The weight of the Pachycephalosaurus was between 815-992 lb (370-450 kg).

Dimensioned series of illustrations of the Pachycephalosaurus
Pachycephalosaurus (Pachycephalosaurus wyomingensis)
Height:
4.3’-7.2’ | 1.3-2.2 m
Width:
19.7”-33.5” | 50-85 cm
Length:
9.8’-16.4’ | 3-5 m
Depth:
Weight:
815-992 lb | 370-450 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Pachycephalosaurus wyomingensis
Lifespan

Drawings include:

Pachycephalosaurus top view, side

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Amargasaurus (Amargasaurus cazaui)
Comparison illustration of the size of a Amargasaurus to a person

The Amargasaurus is a herbivorous sauropod dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous epoch of modern day Argentina. Its two parallel rows of tall spines down its neck and back are taller than in any other known sauropod, and while it was a large animal, it was short in length for a sauropod. Other physical features included a long tail and neck, a small head, and a barrel-shaped trunk that was supported by four column-like legs. It was discovered in February 1984 by Guillermo Rougier during an expedition led by an Argentine paleontologist, Jose Bonaparte.

The Amargasaurus had an overall length between 30’-33' (9.14-10 m), standing height of 7’-8.2’ (2.15-2.5 m), body width of 3.4’-4.4’ (1.05-1.35 m), and weight from 5,700-6,600 lb (2,585-2,994 kg). The typical lifespan of the Amargasaurus was between 25-35 years.

Dimensioned series of illustrations of the Amargasaurus
The Amargasaurus is a herbivorous sauropod dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous epoch of modern day Argentina. Its two parallel rows of tall spines down its neck and back are taller than in any other known sauropod, and while it was a large animal, it was short in length for a sauropod.

The Amargasaurus had an overall length between 30’-33' (9.14-10 m), standing height of 7’-8.2’ (2.15-2.5 m), body width of 3.4’-4.4’ (1.05-1.35 m), and weight from 5,700-6,600 lb (2,585-2,994 kg). The typical lifespan of the Amargasaurus was between 25-35 years.

Dimensioned series of illustrations of the Amargasaurus
Amargasaurus (Amargasaurus cazaui)
Height:
7’-8.2’ | 2.15-2.5 m
Width:
3.4’-4.4’ | 1.05-1.35 m
Length:
30’-33' | 9.14-10 m
Depth:
Weight:
5,700-6,600 lb | 2,585-2,994 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Amargasaurus cazaui
Lifespan
25-35 years

Drawings include:

Amargasaurus top view, side

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Baiji (Lipotes vexillifer)
Comparison drawing of the Baiji compared to other similar species and a person

Baijis are functionally extinct toothed whales under the family Lipotidae that populated the freshwater of the mighty Yangtze River. These animals could be found in groups of up to 16 and loved to surface but were shy and quiet, often avoiding boats. The Baiji was identified by a smaller head with a slender long beak upturned slightly at the tip. They also had small eyes with low vision, smaller triangular dorsal fins positioned halfway along their backs, and broadly rounded flippers on thier stocky bodies. Additionally, Baijis featured in Chinese folklore, relied on sonar for navigation, socializing, and showing emotions and believed to live up to 24 years. Baijis had a pale blue or grey coating on their backs and also spotted a white ventral belly side.

Baijis have a total length between 4.5’-8.5’ (1.37-2.59 m), body height of 11”-20” (27-52 cm), and width of 13”-24” (32-61 cm). The typical weight of the Baiji is in the range of 287-375 lb (130-170 kg). Baiji have lifespans between 24-30 years.

Set of scaled elevation drawings of the Baiji viewed from the side and top
Baijis are functionally extinct toothed whales under the family Lipotidae that populated the freshwater of the mighty Yangtze River. These animals could be found in groups of up to 16 and loved to surface but were shy and quiet, often avoiding boats.

Baijis have a total length between 4.5’-8.5’ (1.37-2.59 m), body height of 11”-20” (27-52 cm), and width of 13”-24” (32-61 cm). The typical weight of the Baiji is in the range of 287-375 lb (130-170 kg). Baiji have lifespans between 24-30 years.

Set of scaled elevation drawings of the Baiji viewed from the side and top
Baiji (Lipotes vexillifer)
Height:
11”-20” | 27-52 cm
Width:
13”-24” | 32-61 cm
Length:
4.5’-8.5’ | 1.37-2.59 m
Depth:
Weight:
287-375 lb | 130-170 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Lipotes vexillifer
Lifespan
24-30 years

Drawings include:

Baiji side elevation, front, top

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Parasaurolophus (Parasaurolophus walkeri)
Scale illustration of an average Parasaurolophus compared to a person

The Parasaurolophus is a herbivorous ornithopod dinosaur that lived in the Late Cretaceous period. Its remains were found in North America (Alberta, New Mexico, and Utah) and parts of Asia (Heilongjiang). Its name translates to ”near crested lizard” in Greek, and this refers to its head adornments. The elaborate cranial crest forms a long curved tube that projects upwards and back from the skull. It walked both as a biped and quadruped, preferring to forage for food on four legs but running on two. Remains of the skin show uniform tubercle-like scales.

The Parasaurolophus had an overall length between 29.5’-36’ (9-11 m), standing height of 14.4’-18.4’ (4.4-5.6 m), body width of 3.9’-4.9’ (1.2-1.5 m), and weight from 6,000-8,000 lb (2,722-3,629 kg). The typical lifespan of the Parasaurolophus was between 55-70 years.

Scaled collection of drawings of Parasaurolophus in various poses with dimensions
The Parasaurolophus is a herbivorous ornithopod dinosaur that lived in the Late Cretaceous period. Its remains were found in North America (Alberta, New Mexico, and Utah) and parts of Asia (Heilongjiang). Its name translates to ”near crested lizard” in Greek, and this refers to its head adornments.

The Parasaurolophus had an overall length between 29.5’-36’ (9-11 m), standing height of 14.4’-18.4’ (4.4-5.6 m), body width of 3.9’-4.9’ (1.2-1.5 m), and weight from 6,000-8,000 lb (2,722-3,629 kg). The typical lifespan of the Parasaurolophus was between 55-70 years.

Scaled collection of drawings of Parasaurolophus in various poses with dimensions
Parasaurolophus (Parasaurolophus walkeri)
Height:
14.4’-18.4’ | 4.4-5.6 m
Width:
3.9’-4.9’ | 1.2-1.5 m
Length:
29.5’-36’ | 9-11 m
Depth:
Weight:
6,000-8,000 lb | 2,722-3,629 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Parasaurolophus walkeri
Lifespan
55-70 years

Drawings include:

Parasaurolophus top view, side

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