Apes or Hominoidea fall under the superfamily Hominoidea or Great Apes. They are endemic to Africa and Southeast Asia. A common feature in apes is the lack of tails. They are expert tree climbers other than humans and gorillas and consume both animal and plant materials. Humans are the most numerous and intelligent in this family. Apes have hair instead of fur, fingernails instead of claws, binocular vision, and a higher brain-to-body size ratio. They include chimpanzees, gibbons, orangutans, and gorillas. Most form social groupings except the orangutans. Apes have an upright body posture composed of a wide chest and broad pelvis.

How are Hominoids different from Anthropoids?

Hominoids are a group of simians that include only humans and apes, while the anthropoids are simians including hominoids, New, and Old World monkeys. Hominoids lack tails, while monkeys in anthropoids have tails. Besides, hominoids have a better brain and mental capacity and a longer lifespan compared to monkeys in anthropoids.

When did Hominoidea first appear?

Fossils of the first hominids were found in Africa and are between 26 to 30 million years old. This is in Fort Ternan, Kenya. Records show that hominids prefered woodland habitats. They had smaller blunt canines and could walk in an upright manner. They also had larger brains and could use tools and communicate through languages.

Why are humans classified as part of Hominoidea?

Humans have a close resemblance and relationship to apes, which are part of the sub-group Hominoidea. This genetic relationship to primates, which includes large, complex brains and even forward-facing eyes, makes them part of the sub-group Hominoidea. Their close relative is the chimpanzee. The only difference is that humans are more intelligent.

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Apes Guides
Browse through our curated Apes Guides for additional categorizations, tips, details, variations, styles, and histories of Apes. Guides provide additional insights into the unique properties and shared relationships between elements.
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Bonobo
671800
39”-49” | 99-125 cm (Upright)
10.6”-14.2” | 27-36 cm
27.6”-32.7” | 70-83 cm
60-86 lb | 27-39 kg
20-45 years (wild); 50-58 years (captivity)
Bonobo
125.000
36.000
83.000
39.000
58.00
671800
GUIDE
3D
Bonobo
39.4”-59” | 100-150 cm (Upright)
18.9”-28” | 48-71 cm
31.9”-47.6” | 81-121 cm
110-220 lb | 50-100 kg
35-45 years (wild); 50-60 years (captivity)
Bornean Orangutan
150.000
71.000
121.000
100.000
60.00
16800
GUIDE
3D
Bornean Orangutan
63”-72” | 160-183 cm (Upright)
25.2”-28” | 64-71 cm
37.4”-47.2” | 95-120 cm
220-460 lb | 100-210 kg
30-40 (wild); 40-60 (captivity)
Eastern Lowland Gorilla
183.000
71.000
120.000
210.000
60.00
4350
GUIDE
3D
Eastern Lowland Gorilla
16.5”-23.2” | 42-59 cm (Upright)
5.9”-8.7” | 15-22 cm
10.6”-14.6” | 27-37 cm (Head to Rear)
9.7-16.8 lb | 4.4-7.6 kg
25-30 years (wild); 35-56 years (captivity)
Lar Gibbon
59.000
22.000
37.000
7.600
56.00
3400
GUIDE
3D
Lar Gibbon
55”-67” | 140-170 cm (Upright)
24”-29.1” | 61-74 cm
37.4”-45.3” | 95-115 cm
154-419 lb | 70-190 kg
35-40 years (wild); 40-50 years (captivity)
Mountain Gorilla
170.000
74.000
115.000
190.000
50.00
27250
GUIDE
3D
Mountain Gorilla
Siamang
36600
29.1”-35.4” | 74-90 cm (Upright)
12.2”-14.6” | 31-37 cm
18.9”-23.6” | 48-60 cm (Head to Rear)
22-31 lb | 10-14 kg
25-30 years (wild); 30-43 years (captivity)
Siamang
90.000
37.000
60.000
14.000
43.00
36600
GUIDE
3D
Siamang
43.3”-59” | 110-150 cm (Upright)
19.3”-26” | 49-66 cm
31.1”-42.5” | 79-108 cm
110-198 lb | 50-90 kg
30-40 years (wild); 34-58 years (captivity)
Sumatran Orangutan
150.000
66.000
108.000
90.000
58.00
12500
GUIDE
3D
Sumatran Orangutan
39”-59” | 99-150 cm (Upright)
13”-18.1” | 33-46 cm
27.2”-37.8” | 69-96 cm
88-104 lb | 40-47 kg
15-25 years (wild); 30-50 years (captivity)
Western Chimpanzee
150.000
46.000
96.000
47.000
50.00
900
GUIDE
3D
Western Chimpanzee
Siamang (Symphalangus syndactylus)
Scale illustration of an average Siamang compared to other species of Apes

The Siamang (Symaphalangus syndactylus) is a species of large gibbon native to the Malay Peninsula and Sumatra. They are distinguishable by their large grayish-pink throat sac which they can inflate to the size of a grapefruit when vocalizing. That singing helps them defend their territory and socialize with other siamangs. They live in the rainforests and monsoon forests of Malaysia and Indonesia, usually remaining in the trees between eighty and a hundred feet high. They are the only gibbons with opposable thumbs and an opposable toe, which allows them to hold things in their hands or in their feet. They also have webbing between their second and third toe.

Siamangs have an upright standing height of 29.1”-35.4” (74-90 cm), head to rear length between 18.9”-23.6” (48-60 cm), and an estimated body width of 12.2”-14.6” (31-37 cm). The typical weight of the Siamang is in the range of 22-31 lb (10-14 kg). Siamangs have lifespans between 25-30 years in the wild and 30-43 years in captivity.

Group of measured illustrations of the Siamang seen from the front and side
The Siamang (Symaphalangus syndactylus) is a species of large gibbon native to the Malay Peninsula and Sumatra. They are distinguishable by their large grayish-pink throat sac which they can inflate to the size of a grapefruit when vocalizing. That singing helps them defend their territory.

Siamangs have an upright standing height of 29.1”-35.4” (74-90 cm), head to rear length between 18.9”-23.6” (48-60 cm), and an estimated body width of 12.2”-14.6” (31-37 cm). The typical weight of the Siamang is in the range of 22-31 lb (10-14 kg). Siamangs have lifespans between 25-30 years in the wild and 30-43 years in captivity.

Group of measured illustrations of the Siamang seen from the front and side
Siamang (Symphalangus syndactylus)
Height:
29.1”-35.4” | 74-90 cm (Upright)
Width:
12.2”-14.6” | 31-37 cm
Length:
18.9”-23.6” | 48-60 cm (Head to Rear)
Depth:
Height (All Fours)
Weight:
22-31 lb | 10-14 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Symphalangus syndactylus
Lifespan
25-30 years (wild); 30-43 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Siamang side elevation (assorted), front

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Bornean Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus)
Scale illustration of an average Bornean Orangutan compared to other species of Apes

The Bornean Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) is a great ape species native to Asia. They have shaggy bright red-orange fur and long arms with both hands and feet suited to grasping tree branches. Bornean orangutans eat up to five hundred different types of plants, but love fruits the best. They live in the rainforests of the island of Borneo, spread across Indonesia, Malaysia, and Brunei. They are the largest arboreal mammals in existence, and one of only three great ape species native to Asia. They also use tools in their daily life, including using sticks to check water depth.

Bornean Orangutans have an upright standing height of 39.4”-59” (100-150 cm), height on all fours of 30.7”-45.7” (78-116 cm), body length between 31.9”-47.6” (81-121 cm), and an estimated body width of 18.9”-28” (48-71 cm). The typical weight of the Bornean Orangutan is in the range of 110-220 lb (50-100 kg). Bornean Orangutans have lifespans between 35-45 years in the wild and 50-60 years in captivity.

Group of measured illustrations of the Bornean Orangutan seen from the front and side
The Bornean Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) is a great ape species native to Asia. They have shaggy bright red-orange fur and long arms with both hands and feet suited to grasping tree branches. Bornean orangutans eat up to five hundred different types of plants, but love fruits the best.

Bornean Orangutans have an upright standing height of 39.4”-59” (100-150 cm), height on all fours of 30.7”-45.7” (78-116 cm), body length between 31.9”-47.6” (81-121 cm), and an estimated body width of 18.9”-28” (48-71 cm). The typical weight of the Bornean Orangutan is in the range of 110-220 lb (50-100 kg). Bornean Orangutans have lifespans between 35-45 years in the wild and 50-60 years in captivity.

Group of measured illustrations of the Bornean Orangutan seen from the front and side
Bornean Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus)
Height:
39.4”-59” | 100-150 cm (Upright)
Width:
18.9”-28” | 48-71 cm
Length:
31.9”-47.6” | 81-121 cm
Depth:
Height (All Fours)
30.7”-45.7” | 78-116 cm
Weight:
110-220 lb | 50-100 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Pongo pygmaeus
Lifespan
35-45 years (wild); 50-60 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Bornean Orangutan side elevation (assorted), front

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Sumatran Orangutan (Pongo abelii)
Drawing comparing the size of the Sumatran Orangutan to simliar Ape species

The Sumatran Orangutan (Pongo abelii) is a species of large primate native to Indonesia. They have orange hair and long arms like other orangutans, but are set apart by the white hairs on their face and long beards. Sumatran orangutans eat a variety of foods but love figs the best. They live in a variety of wet forests of the island of Sumatra, including mangrove forests and riparian forests. Sumatran orangutans are primarily arboreal, living almost entirely in the trees, and sleeping in nests. They are the largest of the three species of orangutan in Asia, and the largest non-human primates in Asia.

Sumatran Orangutans have an upright standing height of 43.3”-59” (110-150 cm), height on all fours of 29.5”-40.2” (75-102 cm), body length between 31.1”-42.5” (79-108 cm), and an estimated body width of 19.3”-26” (49-66 cm). The typical weight of the Sumatran Orangutan is in the range of 110-198 lb (50-90 kg). Sumatran Orangutans have lifespans between 30-40 years in the wild and 34-58 years in captivity.

Collection of dimensioned scaled drawings of the Sumatran Orangutan viewed from the side and front elevations
The Sumatran Orangutan (Pongo abelii) is a species of large primate native to Indonesia. They have orange hair and long arms like other orangutans, but are set apart by the white hairs on their face and long beards. Sumatran orangutans eat a variety of foods but love figs the best.

Sumatran Orangutans have an upright standing height of 43.3”-59” (110-150 cm), height on all fours of 29.5”-40.2” (75-102 cm), body length between 31.1”-42.5” (79-108 cm), and an estimated body width of 19.3”-26” (49-66 cm). The typical weight of the Sumatran Orangutan is in the range of 110-198 lb (50-90 kg). Sumatran Orangutans have lifespans between 30-40 years in the wild and 34-58 years in captivity.

Collection of dimensioned scaled drawings of the Sumatran Orangutan viewed from the side and front elevations
Sumatran Orangutan (Pongo abelii)
Height:
43.3”-59” | 110-150 cm (Upright)
Width:
19.3”-26” | 49-66 cm
Length:
31.1”-42.5” | 79-108 cm
Depth:
Height (All Fours)
29.5”-40.2” | 75-102 cm
Weight:
110-198 lb | 50-90 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Pongo abelii
Lifespan
30-40 years (wild); 34-58 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Sumatran Orangutan side elevation (assorted), front

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Lar Gibbon (Hylobates lar)
Drawing comparing the size of the Lar Gibbon to simliar Ape species

The Lar Gibbon or white-handed Gibbon (Hylobates lar) is a primate species native to southeast and southern Asia. They are known, of course, for their white-furred hands they are named after. Lar gibbons are frugivorous, eating almost entirely fruit, up to half of which is purely figs. They live in southern Asia’s tropical rainforests, in the upper tree canopy, and frequently live their entire lives without ever touching the ground. Early Chinese writers called them ”noble gentlemen” after seeing the way they move through the trees, leaping as much as forty feet from one tree to another, sometimes even snatching birds out of the air.

Lar Gibbons have an upright standing height of 16.5”-23.2” (42-59 cm), head to rear length between 10.6”-14.6” (27-37 cm), and an estimated body width of 5.9”-8.7” (15-22 cm). The typical weight of the Lar Gibbon is in the range of 9.7-16.8 lb (4.4-7.6 kg). Lar Gibbons have lifespans between 25-30 years in the wild and 35-56 years in captivity.

Collection of dimensioned scaled drawings of the Lar Gibbon viewed from the side and front elevations
The Lar Gibbon or white-handed Gibbon (Hylobates lar) is a primate species native to southeast and southern Asia. They are known, of course, for their white-furred hands they are named after. Lar gibbons are frugivorous, eating almost entirely fruit, up to half of which is purely figs.

Lar Gibbons have an upright standing height of 16.5”-23.2” (42-59 cm), head to rear length between 10.6”-14.6” (27-37 cm), and an estimated body width of 5.9”-8.7” (15-22 cm). The typical weight of the Lar Gibbon is in the range of 9.7-16.8 lb (4.4-7.6 kg). Lar Gibbons have lifespans between 25-30 years in the wild and 35-56 years in captivity.

Collection of dimensioned scaled drawings of the Lar Gibbon viewed from the side and front elevations
Lar Gibbon (Hylobates lar)
Height:
16.5”-23.2” | 42-59 cm (Upright)
Width:
5.9”-8.7” | 15-22 cm
Length:
10.6”-14.6” | 27-37 cm (Head to Rear)
Depth:
Height (All Fours)
Weight:
9.7-16.8 lb | 4.4-7.6 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Hylobates lar
Lifespan
25-30 years (wild); 35-56 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Lar Gibbon side elevation (assorted), front

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Mountain Gorilla (Gorilla beringei beringei)
Comparison drawing of the Mountain Gorilla compared to similar Ape species at scale

The Mountain Gorilla (Gorilla beringei beringei) is a species of large primate native to central Africa. They are identified by their thick fur that sets them apart from the lowland gorillas. As their name suggests, they live in the mountains, preferring the colder climate their thick fur is built for. They are an endangered species, but in spite of habitat loss and disease their population has begun growing again. They are similar enough to humans that they can even catch diseases from contact with humans, including the common cold, which tends to hit them harder than it hits the human they caught it from. They are highly intelligent and can communicate in human sign language if taught.

Mountain Gorillas have an upright standing height of 55”-67” (140-170 cm), height on all fours of 35.4”-43.3” (90-110 cm), body length between 37.4”-45.3” (95-115 cm), and an estimated body width of 24”-29.1” (61-74 cm). The typical weight of the Mountain Gorilla is in the range of 154-419 lb (70-190 kg). Mountain Gorillas have lifespans between 35-40 years in the wild and 40-50 years in captivity.

Series of dimensioned drawings of the Mountain Gorilla in front and side views
The Mountain Gorilla (Gorilla beringei beringei) is a species of large primate native to central Africa. They are identified by their thick fur that sets them apart from the lowland gorillas. As their name suggests, they live in the mountains, preferring the colder climate their thick fur is for.

Mountain Gorillas have an upright standing height of 55”-67” (140-170 cm), height on all fours of 35.4”-43.3” (90-110 cm), body length between 37.4”-45.3” (95-115 cm), and an estimated body width of 24”-29.1” (61-74 cm). The typical weight of the Mountain Gorilla is in the range of 154-419 lb (70-190 kg). Mountain Gorillas have lifespans between 35-40 years in the wild and 40-50 years in captivity.

Series of dimensioned drawings of the Mountain Gorilla in front and side views
Mountain Gorilla (Gorilla beringei beringei)
Height:
55”-67” | 140-170 cm (Upright)
Width:
24”-29.1” | 61-74 cm
Length:
37.4”-45.3” | 95-115 cm
Depth:
Height (All Fours)
35.4”-43.3” | 90-110 cm
Weight:
154-419 lb | 70-190 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Gorilla beringei beringei
Lifespan
35-40 years (wild); 40-50 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Mountain Gorilla side elevation (assorted), front

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