Canini is a tribe of dog-like canines including dogs, wolves, jackals and coyotes that inhabit different parts of the world. They are representatives of the dog-like carnivorous families (Caninae) and can be identified by a longer tail, shorter torso, and less pointed ears.

Members of the Canini tribe often exhibit social nature and have advanced expressed behaviors, hence you will find them living in a nuclear family and traveling in groups for cooperative hunting and tackling larger prey. This also allows them to be territorial, dominating areas that they live. Throughout history, members such as wolves have been popular motifs in folklore, religion, and mythology. Besides, they have also been in several literature books and fables, in heraldry and emblems.

What makes a Canini different than a Vulpini?

A Canini is more dog-like while a Vulpini is much more fox-like. The members of the Canini tribe are also regarded as true dogs and have an enlarged frontal sinus while the Vulpini often has shorter legs than the Canini. A Canini is also more closely related to wolves than to a Vulpini.

When did the Canini tribe first appear?

The Canini tribe first appeared about 9 million years ago, is the sister tribe to the Vulpini, and represents the dog-like tribe of the Caninae family. The early Canini tribe was represented by the Eucyon. The members of the Canini tribe include foxes, dogs, and wolves.

Are wolves and foxes related?

Wolves and foxes are related as they are considered cousins. Foxes diverged from the wolf lineage about 12 million years ago. Domesticated dogs also evolved from this diversion and foxes and wolves are their wild relatives. Both the wolves and foxes are a model for the domestication of the dog.

True Dogs | Canini Guides
Browse through our curated True Dogs | Canini Guides for additional categorizations, tips, details, variations, styles, and histories of True Dogs | Canini. Guides provide additional insights into the unique properties and shared relationships between elements.
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25”-31” | 64-79 cm
38”-68” | 97-173 cm
70-155 lb | 32-70 kg
7-10 years (wild); up to 18 years (captivity)
Arctic Wolf
79.000
173.000
70.000
18.00
28000
3D
Arctic Wolf
21”-24” | 53-61 cm
32”-37” | 81-94 cm
20-45 lb | 9-20 kg
10-15 years (wild); up to 20 years (captivity)
Coyote
61.000
94.000
20.000
20.00
600
3D
Coyote
Dingo
105000
20”-24” | 51-61 cm
28”-43” | 71-109 cm
30-45 lb | 14-20 kg
3-7 years (wild); up to 16 years (captivity)
Dingo
61.000
109.000
20.000
16.00
105000
3D
Dingo
22”-25” | 56-64 cm
34”-39” | 86-99 cm
45-55 lb | 20-25 kg
10-15 years (wild); up to 20 years (captivity)
Eastern Coyote
64.000
99.000
25.000
20.00
3600
3D
Eastern Coyote
21”-24” | 53-61 cm
33”-40” | 84-102 cm
25-45 lb | 11-20 kg
7-9 years (wild); up to 12 years (captivity)
Ethiopian Wolf
61.000
102.000
20.000
12.00
7800
3D
Ethiopian Wolf
18”-20” | 46-51 cm
27”-33” | 69-84 cm
18-24 lb | 8-11 kg
8-10 years (wild); up to 16 years (captivity)
Golden Jackal
51.000
84.000
11.000
16.00
5000
3D
Golden Jackal
26”-33” | 66-84 cm
40”-72” | 102-183 cm
50-150 lb | 23-68 kg
6-8 years (wild); up to 17 years (captivity)
Gray Wolf
84.000
183.000
68.000
17.00
35000
3D
Gray Wolf
24”-26” | 61-66 cm
38”-60” | 97-152 cm
45-85 lb | 20-39 kg
5-6 years (wild); up to 14 years (captivity)
Red Wolf
66.000
152.000
39.000
14.00
42000
3D
Red Wolf
Dingo (Canis lupus dingo)
Scale illustration of an average Dingo with dimensions for height and length compared to a human

The Dingo (Canis lupus dingo), also known as a warrigal, is considered as either a sub species of the wolf or its own independent species. Likened to the domestic dog, the Dingo has short fur, pointed ears, and a bushy tail. What sets the Dingo apart from the physical appearance of the domestic dog is its longer snout and teeth and larger ears.

The color of the Dingo’s fur varies from yellowish to brownish with cream underparts, although some have been spotted with a completely black or white coat. The Dingo is highly mobile and carries the reputation of the “singing dog” due to the sound of its howls (used to signal occupied territories).

Dingos have a shoulder height of 20”-24” (51-61 cm), body length between 28”-43” (71-109 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 30-45 lb (14-20 kg). The typical lifespan of a Dingo is 3-7 years in the wild and up to 16 years in captivity.

Collection of scaled drawings of Dingo in various poses
The Dingo (Canis lupus dingo), also known as a warrigal, is considered as either a sub species of the wolf or its own independent species. Likened to the domestic dog, the Dingo has short fur, pointed ears, and a bushy tail. What sets the Dingo apart is its longer snout and teeth and larger ears.

Dingos have a shoulder height of 20”-24” (51-61 cm), body length between 28”-43” (71-109 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 30-45 lb (14-20 kg). The typical lifespan of a Dingo is 3-7 years in the wild and up to 16 years in captivity.

Collection of scaled drawings of Dingo in various poses
Dingo (Canis lupus dingo)
Height:
20”-24” | 51-61 cm
Width:
Length:
28”-43” | 71-109 cm
Depth:
Weight:
30-45 lb | 14-20 kg
Area:
Coat Color
Scientific Name
Canis lupus dingo
Lifespan
3-7 years (wild); up to 16 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Dingo side elevation (standing), front (standing), front (sitting), side (walking)

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Red Wolf (Canis rufus)
Comparison illustration of the size of a Red Wolf to a typical person

The Red Wolf (Canis lupus rufus), native to the southeastern parts of the United States, is one of the world’s most endangered wolves. It is determined as the hybridization of the gray wolf and the coyote (although its exact taxonomy is up for debate).

The red wolf’s appearance is typical to that of other canines, often being compared to greyhounds due to its long and slender limbs. Generally medium in size, the red wolf has a narrow head and large ears and despite its name, is mostly brown with its reddish color appearing on its ears and head.

Red Wolfs have a shoulder height of 24”-26” (61-66 cm), body length between 38”-60” (97-152 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 45-85 lb (20-39 kg). The typical lifespan of a Red Wolf is 5-6 years in the wild and up to 14 years in captivity.

Series of side elevation illustrations of the Red Wolf
The Red Wolf (Canis lupus rufus), native to the southeastern parts of the United States, is one of the world’s most endangered wolves. It is determined as the hybridization of the gray wolf and the coyote (although its exact taxonomy is up for debate).

Red Wolfs have a shoulder height of 24”-26” (61-66 cm), body length between 38”-60” (97-152 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 45-85 lb (20-39 kg). The typical lifespan of a Red Wolf is 5-6 years in the wild and up to 14 years in captivity.

Series of side elevation illustrations of the Red Wolf
Red Wolf (Canis rufus)
Height:
24”-26” | 61-66 cm
Width:
Length:
38”-60” | 97-152 cm
Depth:
Weight:
45-85 lb | 20-39 kg
Area:
Coat Color
Scientific Name
Canis lupus rufus
Lifespan
5-6 years (wild); up to 14 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Red Wolf side elevation (standing), front (standing), front (sitting), side (lying down)

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Eastern Coyote (C. latrans × C. lupus × C. lycaon)
Dimensioned comparison drawing of the Eastern Coyote compared to an average person

The Eastern Coyote (Canis latrans var) is a North American canine of the wolf and coyote family. They have straight ears, a bushy tail, and a narrow chest with fur ranging from dark brown to reddish blonde. The Eastern Coyote is at times referred to as a coyote, coydog, brush wolf, and new wolf.

The Eastern coyote is an omnivore and will eat what is available and easy to either kill or scavenge. They will hunt for mice, moose, rabbits, hares, and deer. Their diet shifts with the seasons.

Eastern Coyotes have a shoulder height of 22”-25” (56-64 cm), body length between 34”-39” (86-99 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 45-55 lb (20-25 kg). The typical lifespan of a Eastern Coyote is 10-15 years in the wild and up to 20 years in captivity.

Set of standing side elevation drawings of the Eastern Coyote
The Eastern Coyote (Canis latrans var) is a North American canine of the wolf and coyote family. They have straight ears, a bushy tail, and a narrow chest with fur ranging from dark brown to reddish blonde. The Eastern Coyote is at times referred to as a coyote, coydog, brush wolf, and new wolf.

Eastern Coyotes have a shoulder height of 22”-25” (56-64 cm), body length between 34”-39” (86-99 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 45-55 lb (20-25 kg). The typical lifespan of a Eastern Coyote is 10-15 years in the wild and up to 20 years in captivity.

Set of standing side elevation drawings of the Eastern Coyote
Eastern Coyote (C. latrans × C. lupus × C. lycaon)
Height:
22”-25” | 56-64 cm
Width:
Length:
34”-39” | 86-99 cm
Depth:
Weight:
45-55 lb | 20-25 kg
Area:
Coat Color
Scientific Name
C. latrans × C. lupus × C. lycaon
Lifespan
10-15 years (wild); up to 20 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Eastern Coyote side elevation (standing), front (standing), side (howling), side (walking)

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Golden Jackal (Canis aureus)
Scale illustration of an average Golden Jackal with dimensions for height and length compared to a human

The Golden Jackal (Canis aureus) is a wolf-like canid. Their coats range from yellow to gold, but they vary from season and region. They are native to southeast Europe, and south Asia. Golden jackals like to live near valleys, by rivers, canals, lakes, and seashores.

They are highly social and adaptable. Golden jackals are omnivorous and they are both predators and scavengers. Their diet consists of rodents, birds, and fruit. They will also scavenge any of the preys by the lion, tiger, leopard, dhole, and gray wolf.

Golden Jackals have a shoulder height of 18”-20” (46-51 cm), body length between 27”-33” (69-84 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 18-24 lb (8-11 kg). The typical lifespan of a Golden Jackal is 8-10 years in the wild and up to 16 years in captivity.

Collection of scaled drawings of Golden Jackal in various poses
The Golden Jackal (Canis aureus) is a wolf-like canid. Their coats range from yellow to gold, but they vary from season and region. They are native to southeast Europe, and south Asia. Golden jackals like to live near valleys, by rivers, canals, lakes, and seashores.

Golden Jackals have a shoulder height of 18”-20” (46-51 cm), body length between 27”-33” (69-84 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 18-24 lb (8-11 kg). The typical lifespan of a Golden Jackal is 8-10 years in the wild and up to 16 years in captivity.

Collection of scaled drawings of Golden Jackal in various poses
Golden Jackal (Canis aureus)
Height:
18”-20” | 46-51 cm
Width:
Length:
27”-33” | 69-84 cm
Depth:
Weight:
18-24 lb | 8-11 kg
Area:
Coat Color
Scientific Name
Canis aureus
Lifespan
8-10 years (wild); up to 16 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Golden Jackal side elevation (standing), front (standing), front (sitting), side (lying down)

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Gray Wolf (Canis lupus)
Dimensioned comparison drawing of the Gray Wolf compared to an average person

The Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) also known as the timber wolves is canine with a long bushy tail that is typically black-tipped. This species of wolf can sometimes look like a large German Shepherd dog. Gray Wolves can be found in Alaska, northern Michigan, Northern Wisconsin, Idaho, Oregon, and Yellowstone.

They are carnivores and like to eat deer, elk, bison, and moose. Like other wolves, Gray Wolves use barking as a warning and howling for long-distance communication. They are the largest wild canine species currently.

Gray Wolfs have a shoulder height of 26”-33” (66-84 cm), body length between 40”-72” (102-183 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 50-150 lb (23-68 kg). The typical lifespan of a Gray Wolf is 6-8 years in the wild and up to 17 years in captivity.

Set of standing side elevation drawings of the Gray Wolf
The Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) also known as the timber wolves is canine with a long bushy tail that is typically black-tipped. This species of wolf can sometimes look like a large German Shepherd dog. Gray Wolves can be found in Alaska, northern Michigan, N Wisconsin, Idaho, Oregon, and Yellowstone.

Gray Wolfs have a shoulder height of 26”-33” (66-84 cm), body length between 40”-72” (102-183 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 50-150 lb (23-68 kg). The typical lifespan of a Gray Wolf is 6-8 years in the wild and up to 17 years in captivity.

Set of standing side elevation drawings of the Gray Wolf
Gray Wolf (Canis lupus)
Height:
26”-33” | 66-84 cm
Width:
Length:
40”-72” | 102-183 cm
Depth:
Weight:
50-150 lb | 23-68 kg
Area:
Coat Color
Scientific Name
Canis lupus
Lifespan
6-8 years (wild); up to 17 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Gray Wolf side elevation (standing), front (standing), side (howling), side (lying down)

Details & Downloads

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