Description
Description

Glires is a clade combining the Rodentia (rodents) and Lagomorpha (rabbits, hares, and pikas) orders. These mammals are primarily characterized by their continuously growing incisors, which they must constantly wear down by gnawing. They evolved around 60 million years ago, diversifying into a wide array of niches across the globe. Rodents, ranging from tiny mice to capybaras, inhabit forests, deserts, and even urban areas, while lagomorphs are more specialized, favoring grasslands and tundra. Their widespread presence and adaptable nature have made them one of the most successful mammalian groups, playing crucial roles in various ecosystems as prey, seed dispersers, and ecosystem engineers.

Anatomy
Anatomy

Glires are known for their strong, ever-growing front teeth (incisors) which they use to gnaw. Their bodies are adapted to their environments, ranging from compact, burrowing forms like moles, to agile hoppers like rabbits. They generally have a robust skeletal structure to support such diverse movement. Many have sensitive whiskers and acute hearing, aiding in their awareness of predators or prey. Their vocalizations vary widely, from the subtle communication of mice to the alarming thumps of a rabbit's foot. Their keen sense of smell is vital for finding food and detecting danger, making them well-equipped for survival.

Human Interaction
Human Interaction

Humans have a multifaceted relationship with Glires, the group comprising rodents and lagomorphs. Historically, many species like rabbits and guinea pigs have been domesticated for companionship and food. In agriculture, rodents are often considered pests, leading to extensive control measures. Pop culture frequently portrays these animals endearingly; think of Mickey Mouse or Bugs Bunny.

Conservation efforts vary: while some species are abundant, others like certain hamsters or pikas face habitat loss and are the focus of preservation initiatives. Education and research are key, promoting coexistence and understanding of these ubiquitous and ecologically significant creatures.

Common Questions
Common Questions
When did lagomorphs and rodents diverge?

It is believed that Lagomorphs and rodents diverged about 64.5 million years ago. Lagomorphs and rodents diverged at the start of the Tertiary time period and at the end of the Cretaceous time period. Their divergence happened as a response reaction to global environmental change.

Do rabbits and rodents have a common ancestor?

It is believed that rabbits and rodents have a common ancestor which is why they share similar characteristics and physical traits. Some of those similar traits have been lost in some lineages while they have been retained within others. Although they do share a common ancestor it is not known who the common ancestor was.

Is a rabbit a rodent?

The rabbit is not a rodent and is not part of the Rodentia group of mammals, although they are often confused. Rabbits are differentiated from rodents by their extra pair of incisors directly located one behind the other as well as other skeletal features. Rabbits and hares are part of the group Lagomorpha.

Animals

* Under Development *

1.4”-2” | 3.5-5 cm
2.75”-3.9” | 7-10 cm
.6-1.2 oz | 18-34 g
4 years (wild); 5-6 years (captivity)
African Dormouse
5.000
10.000
0.034
6.00
70
GUIDE
3D
African Dormouse
4.25”-4.75” | 10.8-12 cm
6”-9” | 15-23 cm
.25-.45 lb | 125-200 g
3-4 years (wild); up to 7 years (captivity)
American Pika
12.000
23.000
0.200
7.00
4900
GUIDE
3D
American Pika
5.9”-7.3” | 15-18.5 cm
12”-16” | 31-41 cm
2-4 lb | .9-1.8 kg
3-5 years (wild); 8-10 years (captivity)
Black-Tailed Prairie Dog
18.500
41.000
1.800
10.00
800
GUIDE
3D
Black-Tailed Prairie Dog
7”-8.7” | 18-22 cm
15.7”-20” | 40-51 cm
.6-1.6 lb | 280-740 g
3-6 years (wild); up to 10 years (captivity)
California Ground Squirrel
22.000
51.000
0.740
10.00
4000
GUIDE
3D
California Ground Squirrel
Capybara
157000
20”-24” | 51-61 cm
42”-53” | 107-135 cm
77-146 lb | 35-66 kg
7-10 years (wild); 10-15 years (captivity)
Capybara
61.000
135.000
66.000
15.00
157000
GUIDE
3D
Capybara
5.1”-5.9” | 13-15 cm
9.8”-12.2” | 25-31 cm
6-10.6 lb | 170-300 g
1-4 years (wild); 5-9 years (captivity)
Common Degu
15.000
31.000
0.300
9.00
19200
GUIDE
3D
Common Degu
2.4”-3.5” | 6-9 cm
6”-10” | 15-25 cm
.6-1.5 lb | 250-700 g
1-2 years (wild); 2-3 years (captivity)
Common Rat
9.000
25.000
0.700
3.00
120000
GUIDE
3D
Common Rat
1.4”-2.2” | 3.5-5.5 cm
3.1”-5.1” | 8-13 cm
.7-1.4 oz | 20-40 g
.5-1 year (wild); 1-3 years (captivity)
Common Vole
5.500
13.000
0.040
3.00
73000
GUIDE
3D
Common Vole
1.8”-2” | 4.5-5 cm
2.75”-3.1” | 7-8 cm
.35-.6 oz | 10-17 g
2-3 years (wild); 4-5 years (captivity)
Dark Kangaroo Mouse
5.000
8.000
0.017
5.00
8000
GUIDE
3D
Dark Kangaroo Mouse
7.5”-9” | 19-22.9 cm
11”-14” | 28-35.6 cm
4-5.5 lb | 1.8-2.5 kg
5-8 years (captivity)
Dutch Rabbit
22.900
35.600
2.500
8.00
6900
GUIDE
3D
Dutch Rabbit
1.6”-2.4” | 4-6 cm
3”-4.5” | 7.6-11.4 cm
.14-.33 lb | 65-150 g
2-4 years (wild); 6-8 years (captivity)
Eastern Chipmunk
6.000
11.400
0.150
8.00
4100
GUIDE
3D
Eastern Chipmunk
7”-9” | 17.8-22.9 cm
15”-18” | 38-45.7 cm
2-4.5 lb | .9-2 kg
2-3 years (wild); up to 7-9 years (captivity)
Eastern Cottontail
22.900
45.700
2.000
9.00
7600
GUIDE
3D
Eastern Cottontail
4.3”-5.5” | 11-14 cm
8”-11” | 20-28 cm
.9-1.3 lb | 400-600 g
6-12 years (wild); up to 20 years (captivity)
Eastern Gray Squirrel
14.000
28.000
0.600
20.00
1900
GUIDE
3D
Eastern Gray Squirrel
8”-10” | 20.3-25.4 cm
14”-18” | 35.6-45.7 cm
9-10.5 lb | 4-4.75 kg
5-7 years (captivity)
English Lop
25.400
45.700
4.750
7.00
3800
GUIDE
3D
English Lop
Groundhog
172000
8.7”-11” | 22-28 cm
16”-20” | 41-51 cm
5-13 lb | 2.3-5.9 kg
3-6 years (wild); 10-14 years (captivity)
Groundhog
28.000
51.000
5.900
14.00
172000
GUIDE
3D
Groundhog
3.3”-4.1” | 8.5-10.5 cm
7.9”-9.8” | 20-25 cm
1.5-2.6 lb | .7-1.2 kg
2-4 years (wild); 5-7 years (captivity)
Guinea Pig | Cavy
10.500
25.000
1.200
7.00
7300
GUIDE
3D
Guinea Pig | Cavy
1.2”-2” | 3-5 cm
2.5”-4” | 6.3-10.2 cm
1.4-1.6 oz | 40-45 g
1-2 years (wild); 2-5 years (captivity)
House Mouse
5.000
10.200
0.045
5.00
17000
GUIDE
3D
House Mouse
4.5”-5” | 11.4-12.7 cm
7”-9” | 18-23 cm
.3-.6 lb | 150-250 g
3-4 years (wild); up to 7 years (captivity)
Ili Pika
12.700
23.000
0.250
7.00
3900
GUIDE
3D
Ili Pika
2.6”-4.3” | 6.5-11 cm
5.5”-9” | 14-23 cm
.3-.5 lb | 150-220 g
5-7 years (wild); 10-19 years (captivity)
Japanese Dwarf Flying Squirrel
11.000
23.000
0.220
19.00
5900
GUIDE
3D
Japanese Dwarf Flying Squirrel
5”-6.5” | 12.7-16.5 cm
8”-10” | 20.3-25.4 cm
2.5-3.5 lb | 1.1-1.6 kg
7-9 years (captivity)
Lionhead Rabbit
16.500
25.400
1.600
9.00
21000
GUIDE
3D
Lionhead Rabbit
4.1”-6.9” | 10.5-17.5 cm
8.5”-14” | 22-36 cm
1.8-2.4 lb | 800-1100 g
8-10 years (wild); 10-20 years (captivity)
Long-Tailed Chinchilla
17.500
36.000
1.100
20.00
1200
GUIDE
3D
Long-Tailed Chinchilla
11”-14.6” | 28-37 cm
23.6”-31.5” | 60-80 cm
13-31 lb | 6-14 kg
Up to 12 years (wild); 12-16 years (captivity)
Lowland Paca
37.000
80.000
14.000
16.00
700
GUIDE
3D
Lowland Paca
6”-7.5” | 15.2-19 cm
10.5”-12.5” | 26.7-31.8 cm
3-4.25 lb | 1.4-1.9 kg
9-10 years (captivity)
Mini Rex
19.000
31.800
1.900
10.00
5000
GUIDE
3D
Mini Rex
2.2”-2.7” | 5.6-6.8 cm
4.5”-5.7” | 11.5-14.5 cm
2-4.6 oz | 60-130 g
2-3 years (wild); 3-5 years (captivity)
Mongolian Gerbil
6.800
14.500
0.130
5.00
2700
GUIDE
3D
Mongolian Gerbil
Muskrat
106000
4.5”-6.7” | 11.5-17 cm
10”-15” | 25-38 cm
1.5-4.5 lb | .7-2 kg
2-4 years (wild); up to 10 years (captivity)
Muskrat
17.000
38.000
2.000
10.00
106000
GUIDE
3D
Muskrat
5”-6” | 12.7-15.2 cm
7.5”-9” | 19-23 cm
2-2.5 lb | .9-1.1 kg
7-12 years (captivity)
Netherland Dwarf Rabbit
15.200
23.000
1.100
12.00
15000
GUIDE
3D
Netherland Dwarf Rabbit
14.2”-16.9” | 36-43 cm
29”-35” | 74-89 cm
25-75 lb | 11.3-34 kg
10-15 years (wild); 15-25 years (captivity)
North American Beaver
43.000
89.000
34.000
25.00
3500
GUIDE
3D
North American Beaver
12.6”-16.5” | 32-42 cm
23.6”-35.4” | 60-90 cm
20-40 lb | 9-18 kg
10-15 years (wild); 15-30 years (captivity)
North American Porcupine
42.000
90.000
18.000
30.00
200
GUIDE
3D
North American Porcupine
2.2”-2.6” | 5.5-6.5 cm
5.1”-6.3” | 13-16 cm
2.5-4.6 oz | 70-130 g
1-2 years (wild); 2-3 years (captivity)
Norway Lemming
6.500
16.000
0.130
3.00
30000
GUIDE
3D
Norway Lemming
8.3”-11.8” | 21-30 cm
16”-25” | 41-64 cm
10-35 lb | 4.5-16 kg
4-7 years (wild); up to 12 years (captivity)
Nutria | Coypu
30.000
64.000
16.000
12.00
11000
GUIDE
3D
Nutria | Coypu
1.8”-2.4” | 4.5-6 cm
3.5”-5.5” | 8-14 cm
2.1-3.4 oz | 60-95 g
2-5 years (wild); 5-10 years (captivity)
Ord’s Kangaroo Rat
6.000
14.000
0.095
10.00
26000
GUIDE
3D
Ord’s Kangaroo Rat
3.5”-5.1” | 9-13 cm
8.2”-13.8” | 21-35 cm
.26-.44 lb | 120-200 g
1-3 years (wild); 5-7 years (captivity)
Plains Pocket Gopher
13.000
35.000
0.200
7.00
450
GUIDE
3D
Plains Pocket Gopher
1.1”-1.9” | 2.7-4.7 cm
2”-3” | 4.5-7.6 cm
.7-1 oz | 20-30 g
2-3 years (wild); 4-5 years (captivity)
Roborovski Dwarf Hamster
4.700
7.600
0.030
5.00
17000
GUIDE
3D
Roborovski Dwarf Hamster
9.4”-13.4” | 24-34 cm
18.5”-27.5” | 47-70 cm
3.5-11 lb | 1.6-5 kg
12-15 years (wild); up to 21 years (captivity)
Yellow-Bellied Marmot
34.000
70.000
5.000
21.00
4200
GUIDE
3D
Yellow-Bellied Marmot
Dark Kangaroo Mouse

The Dark Kangaroo Mouse, a close relative to the kangaroo rat, refers to one of two species of leaping or jumping mouse (pale or dark). Both the pale (Microdipodops pallidus) and dark (Microdipodops megacephalus) kangaroo mice are native to the sandy deserts of the western United States.

Moving bipedally, the kangaroo mouse has tiny front legs, big hindlegs, and tails which are used to maintain balance. It does not need to drink water and is able to meet its nutrient needs from food alone. More so, the kangaroo mouse will collect its food, carry it in its cheeks, and store it in burrows rather than consuming immediately.

Dark Kangaroo Mouses have a height of 1.8”-2” (4.5-5 cm), body length between 2.75”-3.1” (7-8 cm), and an overall weight in the range of .35-.6 oz (10-17 g). The tail length of a Dark Kangaroo Mouse is 2.75”-3.93” (7-10 cm). Dark Kangaroo Mouses have a typical lifespan of 2-3 years in the wild and 4-5 years in captivity.

Dimensioned collection of scaled drawings of the Dark Kangaroo Mouse in various poses
The Dark Kangaroo Mouse, a close relative to the kangaroo rat, refers to one of two species of leaping or jumping mouse (pale or dark). Both the pale (Microdipodops pallidus) and dark (Microdipodops megacephalus) kangaroo mice are native to the sandy deserts of the western United States.

Dark Kangaroo Mouses have a height of 1.8”-2” (4.5-5 cm), body length between 2.75”-3.1” (7-8 cm), and an overall weight in the range of .35-.6 oz (10-17 g). The tail length of a Dark Kangaroo Mouse is 2.75”-3.93” (7-10 cm). Dark Kangaroo Mouses have a typical lifespan of 2-3 years in the wild and 4-5 years in captivity.

Dimensioned collection of scaled drawings of the Dark Kangaroo Mouse in various poses
Dark Kangaroo Mouse
Height:
1.8”-2” | 4.5-5 cm
Width:
Length:
2.75”-3.1” | 7-8 cm
Depth:
Weight:
.35-.6 oz | 10-17 g
Area:
Tail Length
2.75”-3.93” | 7-10 cm
Scientific Name
Microdipodops megacephalus
Lifespan
2-3 years (wild); 4-5 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Dark Kangaroo Mouse side elevation (standing), front (standing), side (jumping)

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Netherland Dwarf Rabbit

The Netherland Dwarf Rabbit is a miniature domestic rabbit that originated from the Netherlands. It is one of the smallest rabbit breeds as they have a short, well-rounded, and compact body. The Netherland Dwarf Rabbit has different fur colors.

It has a popularity for being a show rabbit. These do not often make good pets as they do not like to be picked up or held tightly. The Netherland Dwarf diet consists of pellets, veggies, and hay. Their digestive system is more sensitive than other breeds. They are high-energy and can be stubborn.

Netherland Dwarf Rabbits have a shoulder height of 5”-6” (12.7-15.2 cm), body length between 7.5”-9” (19-23 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 2-2.5 lb (.9-1.1 kg). The ears of a Netherland Dwarf Rabbit are 2”-2.5” (5-6.4 cm) in length. The typical lifespan of a Netherland Dwarf Rabbit is 7-12 years when raised in captivity.

Dimensioned collection of scaled drawings of Netherland Dwarf Rabbit in various poses
The Netherland Dwarf Rabbit is a miniature domestic rabbit that originated from the Netherlands. It is one of the smallest rabbit breeds as they have a short, well-rounded, and compact body. The Netherland Dwarf Rabbit has different fur colors.

Netherland Dwarf Rabbits have a shoulder height of 5”-6” (12.7-15.2 cm), body length between 7.5”-9” (19-23 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 2-2.5 lb (.9-1.1 kg). The ears of a Netherland Dwarf Rabbit are 2”-2.5” (5-6.4 cm) in length. The typical lifespan of a Netherland Dwarf Rabbit is 7-12 years when raised in captivity.

Dimensioned collection of scaled drawings of Netherland Dwarf Rabbit in various poses
Netherland Dwarf Rabbit
Height:
5”-6” | 12.7-15.2 cm
Width:
Length:
7.5”-9” | 19-23 cm
Depth:
Weight:
2-2.5 lb | .9-1.1 kg
Area:
Ear Length
2”-2.5” | 5-6.4 cm
Scientific Name
Oryctolagus cuniculus domesticus
Lifespan
7-12 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Netherland Dwarf Rabbit side elevation (standing), front (standing)

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Nutria | Coypu
Dimensioned size comparison illustration of the Nutria (Coypu) compared to an average person

Also known as the Nutria, the Coypu (Myocastor coypus) is a rodent native to the subtropics of South America. The Coypu is known to spend its time both on land and in the water. As an herbivore, the Coypu feeds on vegetation and resides in burrows-- both of which are found along the banks of the marshes and lakes it inhabits.

The Coypu is similar in appearance to both the beaver and the rat, although larger in size, and has distinguishable features which includes coarse brown hair, webbed feet, a long round tail, and incisors of a vibrant orange color.

Nutrias have a height of 8.3”-11.8” (21-30 cm), body length between 16”-25” (41-64 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 10-35 lb (4.5-16 kg). The tail length of a Nutria is 10”-16” (25-41 cm). Nutrias have a typical lifespan of 4-7 years in the wild and up to 12 years in captivity.

Set of scaled elevation drawings of the Nutria (Coypu) in assorted postures
Also known as the Nutria, the Coypu (Myocastor coypus) is a rodent native to the subtropics of South America. The Coypu is known to spend its time both on land and in the water. As an herbivore, the Coypu feeds on vegetation and resides in burrows—both of which are found along marshy banks.

Nutrias have a height of 8.3”-11.8” (21-30 cm), body length between 16”-25” (41-64 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 10-35 lb (4.5-16 kg). The tail length of a Nutria is 10”-16” (25-41 cm). Nutrias have a typical lifespan of 4-7 years in the wild and up to 12 years in captivity.

Set of scaled elevation drawings of the Nutria (Coypu) in assorted postures
Nutria | Coypu
Height:
8.3”-11.8” | 21-30 cm
Width:
Length:
16”-25” | 41-64 cm
Depth:
Weight:
10-35 lb | 4.5-16 kg
Area:
Tail Length
10”-16” | 25-41 cm
Scientific Name
Myocastor coypus
Lifespan
4-7 years (wild); up to 12 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Nutria (Coypu) side elevation (standing), front (standing), side (upright)

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Lionhead Rabbit

The Lionhead Rabbit has a lion-like mane with an upright body type and short ears. They are considered to be a fancy breed. Lionhead rabbits were first bred in Belgium and later became popular in the United States in 1990s.

Lionhead Rabbits have a lot of hair that should be brushed at least once a week. They grow a thicker coat in the winter and shed during the spring. Some have a single mane and others have a double mane. They are generally well-mannered, friendly and easy to train. Their diet mainly consists of hay.

Lionhead Rabbits have a shoulder height of 5”-6.5” (12.7-16.5 cm), body length between 8”-10” (20.3-25.4 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 2.5-3.5 lb (1.1-1.6 kg). The ears of a Lionhead Rabbit are 2”-3” (5-7.6 cm) in length. The typical lifespan of a Lionhead Rabbit is 7-9 years in captivity.

Series of dimensioned side elevation illustrations of the Lionhead Rabbit
The Lionhead Rabbit has a lion-like mane with an upright body type and short ears. They are considered to be a fancy breed. Lionhead rabbits were first bred in Belgium and later became popular in the United States in 1990s.

Lionhead Rabbits have a shoulder height of 5”-6.5” (12.7-16.5 cm), body length between 8”-10” (20.3-25.4 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 2.5-3.5 lb (1.1-1.6 kg). The ears of a Lionhead Rabbit are 2”-3” (5-7.6 cm) in length. The typical lifespan of a Lionhead Rabbit is 7-9 years in captivity.

Series of dimensioned side elevation illustrations of the Lionhead Rabbit
Lionhead Rabbit
Height:
5”-6.5” | 12.7-16.5 cm
Width:
Length:
8”-10” | 20.3-25.4 cm
Depth:
Weight:
2.5-3.5 lb | 1.1-1.6 kg
Area:
Ear Length
2”-3” | 5-7.6 cm
Scientific Name
Oryctolagus cuniculus domesticus
Lifespan
7-9 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Lionhead Rabbit side elevation (standing), front (standing)

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English Lop

The English Lop is a fancy domestic rabbit breed developed in England in the 19th century. They are characterized by their long top ears and a large body size. The English Lop rabbit is sometimes referred to as the dogs of the rabbit world. The English Lop coat ranges in a variety of solid and broken colors.

They are sometimes lazy, outgoing, curious, and friendly. English Lops are an intelligent rabbit and can be trained with tricks and commands. This species diet mostly consists of hay.

English Lops have a shoulder height of 8”-10” (20.3-25.4 cm), body length between 14”-18” (35.6-45.7 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 9-10.5 lb (4-4.75 kg). The ears of an English Lop are 9”-13” (22.9-33 cm) in length. The typical lifespan of an English Lop is 5-7 years when raised in captivity.

Dimensioned set of standing side elevation drawings of the English Lop
The English Lop is a fancy domestic rabbit breed developed in England in the 19th century. They are characterized by their long top ears and a large body size. The English Lop rabbit is sometimes referred to as the dogs of the rabbit world.

English Lops have a shoulder height of 8”-10” (20.3-25.4 cm), body length between 14”-18” (35.6-45.7 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 9-10.5 lb (4-4.75 kg). The ears of an English Lop are 9”-13” (22.9-33 cm) in length. The typical lifespan of an English Lop is 5-7 years when raised in captivity.

Dimensioned set of standing side elevation drawings of the English Lop
English Lop
Height:
8”-10” | 20.3-25.4 cm
Width:
Length:
14”-18” | 35.6-45.7 cm
Depth:
Weight:
9-10.5 lb | 4-4.75 kg
Area:
Ear Length
9”-13” | 22.9-33 cm
Scientific Name
Oryctolagus cuniculus domesticus
Lifespan
5-7 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

English Lop side elevation (standing), front (standing), front (sitting)

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