Grassland | Plains Animals

Plains animals refer to the small but unique set of animals that inhabit the Great Plains regions of North America. Living within this diverse ecosystem that faces difficult natural conditions including limited rainfall and harsh winters and summers, plains animals have uniquely adapted to survive by roaming the prairie grasslands and hillsides. Today, plains animals are increasingly threatened by resource extraction and fragmentation which has led to calls for preservation and restoration of the region. Plains animals include a broad variety of species from the iconic bison to ferrets, wolves, coyotes, foxes, and grazing animals.

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Grassland Animals

Zebra
51.0"-75.0" (4’3”-6’3”) | 1.3-1.9 m
3D
Bison | Buffalo
60.0"-78.0" (5’-6’6”) | 1.52-1.98 m
3D
Hippopotamus
54.0"-78.0" (4’6"-6'6") | 1.4-2 m
3D
Rhinoceros
66.0"-81.0" (5’6"-6’9") | 1.7-2.1 m
3D
Zebra
64.0"-96.0" (5’4”-8’) | 1.6-2.4 m
3D
Bison | Buffalo
79.0"-138.0" (6’7”-11’6”) | 2-3.5 m
3D
Hippopotamus
114.0"-168.0" (9’6"-14’) | 2.9-4.3 m
3D
Turkey
1.5-1.75 years (farm); 10 (wild)
3D
Lion
10-15 years (wild), 30 (captivity)
3D
Bison | Buffalo
15 years (wild), 25 years (captivity)
3D
Sloth Bear
20 years (wild); up to 40 years (captivity)
3D
Grizzly Bear
20-25 years (wild); up to 45 years (captivity)
3D

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Gazelle
Comparison with measurements illustrating the size of a Gazelle to a human woman

Gazelles are medium-sized antelopes known for their ringed horns and swift running speeds that can reach up to 40 mph (64 km/h). Living in large herds of several hundred, gazelles graze in wide-open plains in search of grasses, shoots, and leaves.

The average Gazelle has an overall height of 42.0”-49.0” (107-125 cm), withers height of 30.0”-37.0” (76-94 cm), and body length of 42.0”-49.0” (107-125 cm). A typical Gazelle weighs between 90-180 lb (41-82 kg) and has a lifespan of roughly 10-12 years.

Drawings of Gazelles from the side, front, back and laying down
Gazelles are medium-sized antelopes known for their ringed horns and swift speeds up to 40 mph (64 km/h). Living in large herds, gazelles graze in open plains in search of grasses, shoots, and leaves.

The average Gazelle has an overall height of 42.0”-49.0” (107-125 cm), withers height of 30.0”-37.0” (76-94 cm), and body length of 42.0”-49.0” (107-125 cm). A typical Gazelle weighs between 90-180 lb (41-82 kg) and has a lifespan of roughly 10-12 years.

Drawings of Gazelles from the side, front, back and laying down
Gazelle
Height:
42.0”-49.0” | 107-125 cm
Width:
Length:
42.0”-49.0” | 107-125 cm
Depth:
30.0”-37.0” | 76-94 cm
Weight:
90-180 lb | 41-82 kg
Area:
Gazella
10-12 years

Drawings include:
Gazelle side profile (standing), front, back, side (laying down)

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White-Tailed Deer
Comparison illustration of the size of a White-Tailed Deer to an average human

White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus), also known as Virginia deer, is a common American deer species that ranges from the Arctic Circle in western Canada to Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia. The White-Tailed Deer is named for the thick white fur on the underside of the neck and the rear while the rest of their coat is reddish in the summer and a dull gray in the winter.

The hair of the White-Tailed Deer is flared during flight, and their tail resembles a signaling flag. While White-Tailed Deer from North and South America are generally accepted as one group, genetically these deer are farther apart than White-Tailed and Black-Tailed Deer in North America.

White-Tailed Deer have standing shoulder heights between 2'8"-3' (81-91 cm), head-to-body lengths in the range of 3’1”-7’2” (95-220 cm), and overall weights of 80-250 lb (36-113 kg). The lifespan of a wild White-Tailed Deer is roughly 6-15 years.

Series of side elevation illustrations of the White-Tailed Deer
White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus), also known as Virginia deer, is a common American deer species that ranges from the Arctic Circle in western Canada to Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia. The White-Tailed Deer is named for the thick white fur on the underside of the neck and the rear.

White-Tailed Deer have standing shoulder heights between 2'8"-3' (81-91 cm), head-to-body lengths in the range of 3’1”-7’2” (95-220 cm), and overall weights of 80-250 lb (36-113 kg). The lifespan of a wild White-Tailed Deer is roughly 6-15 years.

Series of side elevation illustrations of the White-Tailed Deer
White-Tailed Deer
Height:
2'8"-3' | 81-91 cm
Width:
Length:
3’1”-7’2” | 95-220 cm
Depth:
Weight:
80-250 lb | 36-113 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Odocoileus virginianus
Lifespan
6-15 years

Drawings include:

White-Tailed Deer side elevation (standing), front (standing), side (running)

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Hippopotamus
Drawing comparing the scale of a hippopotamus to a human with dimensions for height and length

Hippopotamuses, or hippos for short, are large semiaquatic mammals found in sub-Saharan Africa. Commonly sighted in rivers, swamps and lakes, the hippopotamus is an herbivore that lives mostly in the water when not feeding on nearby grasses. The hippo is the third-largest land mammal on the planet.

The typical Hippopotamus has an overall height of 54.0"-78.0" (1.4-2 m) and body length of 114.0"-168.0" (9’6"-14’) (2.9-4.3 m). An average Hippopotamus weighs between 3,100-8,800 lb (1,500-4,000 kg) and has a typical lifespan of 40-50 years.

Illustrations of a Hippopotamus from the side, front, back, and laying down
Hippopotamuses, or hippos for short, are large semiaquatic mammals found in sub-Saharan Africa. Commonly sighted in rivers, swamps and lakes, the hippopotamus is an herbivore that lives mostly in the water when not feeding on nearby grasses. The hippo is the third-largest land mammal on the planet.

The typical Hippopotamus has an overall height of 54.0"-78.0" (1.4-2 m) and body length of 114.0"-168.0" (9’6"-14’) (2.9-4.3 m). An average Hippopotamus weighs between 3,100-8,800 lb (1,500-4,000 kg) and has a typical lifespan of 40-50 years.

Illustrations of a Hippopotamus from the side, front, back, and laying down
Hippopotamus
Height:
54.0"-78.0" (4’6"-6'6") | 1.4-2 m
Width:
Length:
114.0"-168.0" (9’6"-14’) | 2.9-4.3 m
Depth:
Weight:
3,100-8,800 lb | 1,500-4,000 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Hippopotamus amphibius
Lifespan
40-50 years

Drawings include:
Hippopotamus side profile, front, back, side (laying down)

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Horses
Height:
Width:
Length:
Depth:
Weight:
Area:
Lifespan
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Elk | Wapiti
Scaled drawing comparing the size of a Elk (Wapiti) to a typical person

Elk (Cervus Canadensis), or Wapiti, are not only one of the world's largest game deer but also one of North America's and East Asia's largest mammals. They are attractive, and perhaps that is why they are hunted in different parts of the world for sport.

Male Elk have large 5 feet (1.5 m) wide antlers usually with 6 or 7 tines. Female Elk do not have antlers. Elk have small tails, with between 3 to 8 inches (7.6-20.3 cm) of tan-colored patch. Elk's backs are brown to tan, a bit reddish in the summer, and their bottom is darker. Elk meat becomes more and more protein-rich as they get older and its antlers are generally kept as game trophies

Elk (Wapiti) have standing shoulder heights between 4’-5’7” (122-170 cm), head-to-body lengths in the range of 6’10”-8” (208-244 cm), and overall weights of 325-1100 lb (147-500 kg). The lifespan of a wild Elk is roughly 10-15 years.

Group of illustrated side elevation drawings of the Elk (Wapiti)
Elk (Cervus Canadensis), or Wapiti, are not only one of the world's largest game deer but also one of North America's and East Asia's largest mammals. They are attractive, and perhaps that is why they are hunted in different parts of the world for sport.

Elk (Wapiti) have standing shoulder heights between 4’-5’7” (122-170 cm), head-to-body lengths in the range of 6’10”-8” (208-244 cm), and overall weights of 325-1100 lb (147-500 kg). The lifespan of a wild Elk is roughly 10-15 years.

Group of illustrated side elevation drawings of the Elk (Wapiti)
Elk | Wapiti
Height:
4’-5’7” | 122-170 cm
Width:
Length:
6’10”-8” | 208-244 cm
Depth:
Weight:
325-1100 lb | 147-500 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Cervus canadensis
Lifespan
10-15 years

Drawings include:

Elk (Wapiti) side elevation (standing), front (standing), side (lying down)

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