Grassland | Plains Animals

Plains animals refer to the small but unique set of animals that inhabit the Great Plains regions of North America. Living within this diverse ecosystem that faces difficult natural conditions including limited rainfall and harsh winters and summers, plains animals have uniquely adapted to survive by roaming the prairie grasslands and hillsides. Today, plains animals are increasingly threatened by resource extraction and fragmentation which has led to calls for preservation and restoration of the region. Plains animals include a broad variety of species from the iconic bison to ferrets, wolves, coyotes, foxes, and grazing animals.

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Grassland Animals

Zebra
51.0"-75.0" (4’3”-6’3”) | 1.3-1.9 m
3D
Bison | Buffalo
60.0"-78.0" (5’-6’6”) | 1.52-1.98 m
3D
Hippopotamus
54.0"-78.0" (4’6"-6'6") | 1.4-2 m
3D
Rhinoceros
66.0"-81.0" (5’6"-6’9") | 1.7-2.1 m
3D
Zebra
64.0"-96.0" (5’4”-8’) | 1.6-2.4 m
3D
Bison | Buffalo
79.0"-138.0" (6’7”-11’6”) | 2-3.5 m
3D
Hippopotamus
114.0"-168.0" (9’6"-14’) | 2.9-4.3 m
3D
Turkey
1.5-1.75 years (farm); 10 (wild)
3D
Lion
10-15 years (wild), 30 (captivity)
3D
Bison | Buffalo
15 years (wild), 25 years (captivity)
3D
Caracal
10-12 years (wild); 15-20 years (captivity)
3D
Jaguarundi
10-12 years (wild); Up to 20 years (captivity)
3D
Serval
10-12 years (wild); Up to 20 years (captivity)
3D
Wild Boar
10-14 years (wild); up to 20 years (captivity)
3D
Ocelot
12-15 years (wild); Up to 20 years (captivity)
3D
Warthog
15-18 years (wild); up to 20 years (captivity)
3D
Sloth Bear
20 years (wild); up to 40 years (captivity)
3D
Grizzly Bear
20-25 years (wild); up to 45 years (captivity)
3D

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Rhinoceros
Scale comparison of a human to a Rhinoceros with dimensions for length and height

Rhinoceroses, or rhinos, are large herbivorous mammals with one or two upright horns and thick gray or brown skin. Found in the grasslands and savannas of Africa and Asia, the rhinoceros is one of the most endangered animals on the planet due to rampant poaching for their horns. Rhinos are the world’s second-largest land mammal.

The typical Rhinoceros has an overall height of 66.0"-81.0" (1.7-2.1 m) and body length of 132.0"-165.0" (11’-13’9") (3.4-4.2 m). An average Rhinoceros weighs between 3,500-8,800 lb (1,600-4,000 kg) and has a typical lifespan of 35-40 years.

Drawings of a Rhinoceros in various postures from the side, front, back, and laying down
Rhinoceroses, or rhinos, are large herbivorous mammals with one or two upright horns and thick gray or brown skin. Found in the grasslands and savannas of Africa and Asia, the rhinoceros is one of the most endangered animals on the planet due to rampant poaching for their horns.

The typical Rhinoceros has an overall height of 66.0"-81.0" (1.7-2.1 m) and body length of 132.0"-165.0" (11’-13’9") (3.4-4.2 m). An average Rhinoceros weighs between 3,500-8,800 lb (1,600-4,000 kg) and has a typical lifespan of 35-40 years.

Drawings of a Rhinoceros in various postures from the side, front, back, and laying down
Rhinoceros
Height:
66.0"-81.0" (5’6"-6’9") | 1.7-2.1 m
Width:
Length:
11’-13’9" | 3.4-4.2 m
Depth:
Weight:
3,500-8,800 lb | 1,600-4,000 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Rhinocerotidae
Lifespan
35-40 years

Drawings include:
Rhinoceros side elevation (standing), front, back, side (laying down)

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Ocelot
Dimensioned comparison drawing of the Ocelot compared to an average person

The Ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) is a spotted wild cat spanning from the southwestern United States to South America. It is larger in size than domestic cats but relatively small in comparison to the more well known big cats.

Its extensively marked fur is the Ocelot’s most distinguishable feature: black spots on the head and underside, stripes or bands on the neck and back, and splotches along the tail. The coat itself is short, smooth, and varying in color from a tawny cream to a reddish grey. The Ocelot is solitary and silent, easily adapting to disturbed habitats.

Ocelots have a shoulder height between 15”-20” (38-51 cm), body length of 27”-40” (69-102 cm), and weight in the range of 18-40 lb (8-18 kg). The tail of an Ocelot is 12”-18” (31-46 cm) in length. Ocelots have a typical lifespan of 12-15 years in the wild and up to 20 years in captivity.

Set of standing side elevation drawings of the Ocelot
The Ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) is a spotted wild cat spanning from the southwestern United States to South America. It is larger in size than domestic cats but relatively small in comparison to the more well known big cats. Its extensively marked fur is the Ocelot’s most distinguishable feature.

Ocelots have a shoulder height between 15”-20” (38-51 cm), body length of 27”-40” (69-102 cm), and weight in the range of 18-40 lb (8-18 kg). The tail of an Ocelot is 12”-18” (31-46 cm) in length. Ocelots have a typical lifespan of 12-15 years in the wild and up to 20 years in captivity.

Set of standing side elevation drawings of the Ocelot
Ocelot
Height:
15”-20” | 38-51 cm
Width:
Length:
27”-40” | 69-102 cm
Depth:
Weight:
18-40 lb | 8-18 kg
Area:
Tail Length
12”-18” | 31-46 cm
Scientific Name
Leopardus pardalis
Lifespan
12-15 years (wild); Up to 20 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Ocelot side elevation (standing), front (sitting), side (lying down)

Details & Downloads

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