Endangered Species | Animals

Endangered Species | Animals

Description
Description

Endangered species are groups of organisms facing a high risk of extinction due to factors like habitat loss, pollution, climate change, poaching, and invasive species. Their habitats vary widely, encompassing rainforests, oceans, deserts, and more. These species have evolved over millions of years, adapting to specific ecological niches. However, rapid environmental changes often outpace their ability to adapt. Conservationists categorize them using criteria like population size and rate of decline. Protecting endangered species is vital for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem health. Efforts include habitat preservation, legal protection, breeding programs, and reintroduction initiatives to restore their populations.

Anatomy
Anatomy

Endangered species exhibit a diverse range of anatomies, adapted to their unique habitats. From the thick fur of polar bears for insulation to the keen eyesight of eagles for hunting, each feature serves a survival purpose. Many possess specialized limbs, like the powerful legs of the snow leopard for leaping, or the flippers of sea turtles for swimming. Vocalizations vary, with some using complex calls for communication or mating. Senses like smell, hearing, and sight are often highly developed to detect predators or prey. Despite this rich variety, common threats like habitat destruction and climate change jeopardize their existence, underscoring the need for conservation efforts.

Human Interaction
Human Interaction

Humans have a complex relationship with endangered species, historically exploiting many for resources, leading to their decline. As awareness grew, so did efforts to protect them, with laws like the Endangered Species Act and organizations dedicated to conservation. Pop culture often highlights their plight, with films like "The Cove" and "Blackfish" sparking public outcry and change. Zoos and sanctuaries play roles in education and breeding programs. Globally, initiatives like habitat restoration and anti-poaching measures seek to reverse damage. This evolving dynamic reflects a growing recognition of the intrinsic value of these species and the critical need to preserve Earth’s biodiversity.

Common Questions
Common Questions
How can we protect endangered species?

We can protect endangered species by learning more about the endangered species around our surrounding communities, minimizing the use of pesticides, and reducing our consumption of water within the home. Other ways to protect endangered species include recycling, not littering, and not purchasing products that are made from endangered animal species.

What is the most endangered species in the world?

The most endangered species in the world include the southern rockhopper penguin, snow leopard, savanna elephant, polar bear, and olive ridley turtle. Other endangered animal species are the marine iguana, loggerhead turtle, and hippopotamus. The greater one-horned rhino, greater white shark, giant tortoise, giant panda, and dugong are also considered endangered animal species.

Why are species endangered?

Animal species are endangered due to loss of habitat which happens either through human actions or naturally as well as loss of genetic variation. Other reasons for species being endangered include loss of genetic variation, which can sometimes occur naturally or happen due to human activity.

24”-50” | 61-127 cm
7’-15’ | 2.1-4.6 m
550–2000 lb | 250-907 kg
15-30 years
Atlantic Bluefin Tuna
127.000
460.000
907.000
30.00
4300
GUIDE
3D
Atlantic Bluefin Tuna
34”-45” | 86-114 cm
5’3”-6’5” | 160-196 cm
220-650 lb | 100-295 kg
8-10 years (wild); 18-25 years (captivity)
Bengal Tiger
114.000
196.000
295.000
25.00
45000
GUIDE
3D
Bengal Tiger
4.9’-6.2’ | 1.5-1.9 m
3’-3.6’ | .9-1.1 m
9.8’-12.3’ | 3-3.75 m
1,764-3,086 lb | 800-1,400 kg
30-50 years
Black Rhinoceros
190.000
110.000
375.000
1400.000
50.00
66000
GUIDE
3D
Black Rhinoceros
3.9”-5.9” | 10-15 cm
2.6”-3.5” | 6.5-9 cm
13”-18.1” | 33-46 cm
1.3-3.1 lb | .6-1.4 kg
4-9 years
Black-Footed Ferret
15.000
9.000
46.000
1.400
9.00
24000
GUIDE
3D
Black-Footed Ferret
13’-16’ | 3.96-4.88 m
25.3’-31.8’ | 7.7-9.7 m
82’-105’ | 25-32 m
55-165 tons | 50-150 metric tons
80-90 years
Blue Whale
488.000
970.000
3200.000
150000.000
90.00
182000
GUIDE
3D
Blue Whale
Bonobo
671800
39”-49” | 99-125 cm (Upright)
10.6”-14.2” | 27-36 cm
27.6”-32.7” | 70-83 cm
60-86 lb | 27-39 kg
20-45 years (wild); 50-58 years (captivity)
Bonobo
125.000
36.000
83.000
39.000
58.00
671800
GUIDE
3D
Bonobo
39.4”-59” | 100-150 cm (Upright)
18.9”-28” | 48-71 cm
31.9”-47.6” | 81-121 cm
110-220 lb | 50-100 kg
35-45 years (wild); 50-60 years (captivity)
Bornean Orangutan
150.000
71.000
121.000
100.000
60.00
16800
GUIDE
3D
Bornean Orangutan
63”-72” | 160-183 cm (Upright)
25.2”-28” | 64-71 cm
37.4”-47.2” | 95-120 cm
220-460 lb | 100-210 kg
30-40 (wild); 40-60 (captivity)
Eastern Lowland Gorilla
183.000
71.000
120.000
210.000
60.00
4350
GUIDE
3D
Eastern Lowland Gorilla
9.5’-11.5’ | 2.9-3.5 m
15.4’-18.4’ | 4.7-5.6 m
75’-90’ | 22.9-27.4 m
74-114 tons | 67-103 metric tons
80-100 years
Fin Whale
350.000
560.000
2740.000
103419.000
100.00
35800
GUIDE
3D
Fin Whale
18”-21” | 46-53 cm
5.5”-6.7” | 14-17 cm
3.5-6 lb | 1.6-2.7 kg
15-20 years
Galápagos Penguin
53.000
17.000
2.700
20.00
16400
GUIDE
3D
Galápagos Penguin
1’6”-3" | .46-.91 m
4’6”-6’ | 1.37-1.83 m
150-250 lb | 68-114 kg
15-25 (wild); 20-30 years (captivity)
Giant Panda Bear
91.000
183.000
114.000
30.00
307000
GUIDE
3D
Giant Panda Bear
14.2”-18.9” | 36-48 cm
27.5”-36.2” | 70-92 cm (Carapace)
36”-48” | 91-122 cm (Carapace)
243-419 lb | 110-190 kg
60-75 years (wild); 80-120 years (captivity)
Green Sea Turtle
48.000
92.000
122.000
190.000
120.00
46700
GUIDE
3D
Green Sea Turtle
9.4”-15” | 24-38 cm
17.7”-27.2” | 45-69 cm (Carapace)
24”-36” | 61-91 cm (Carapace)
99-198 lb | 45-90 kg
30-45 years (wild); 30-60 years (captivity)
Hawksbill Sea Turtle
38.000
69.000
91.000
90.000
60.00
15400
GUIDE
3D
Hawksbill Sea Turtle
6.58’-11.42’ | 2-3.5 m
3.28’-6.23’ | 1-1.9 m
8.2’-14.44’ | 2.5-4.4 m
4,409-11,023 lb | 2,000-5,500 kg
50-80 years
Indian Elephant
350.000
190.000
440.000
5500.000
80.00
61700
GUIDE
3D
Indian Elephant
16”-19” | 42-49 cm
19”-22” | 48-56 cm
7’-8.17’ | 2.13-2.49 m
154-243 lb | 70-110 kg
18-26 years
Indus River Dolphin
49.000
56.000
249.000
110.000
26.00
4500
GUIDE
3D
Indus River Dolphin
14”-21” | 36-54 cm
15”-23” | 39-59 cm
5.92’-9’ | 1.8-2.74 m
198-441 lb | 90-200 kg
15-30 years
Irrawaddy Dolphin
54.000
59.000
274.000
200.000
30.00
23400
GUIDE
3D
Irrawaddy Dolphin
4.9’-5.6’ | 1.5-1.7 m
3’-3.3’ | .9-1 m
9.8’-11.2’ | 3-3.4 m
3,307-4,409 lb | 1,500-2,000 kg
30-45 years
Javan Rhinoceros
170.000
100.000
340.000
2000.000
45.00
29700
GUIDE
3D
Javan Rhinoceros
55”-67” | 140-170 cm (Upright)
24”-29.1” | 61-74 cm
37.4”-45.3” | 95-115 cm
154-419 lb | 70-190 kg
35-40 years (wild); 40-50 years (captivity)
Mountain Gorilla
170.000
74.000
115.000
190.000
50.00
27250
GUIDE
3D
Mountain Gorilla
9.2’-11.1’ | 2.8-3.4 m
14.8’-18’ | 4.5-5.5 m
43’-52’ | 13.1-15.8 m
44-75 tons | 40-68 metric tons
50-70 years
North Atlantic Right Whale
340.000
550.000
1580.000
68039.000
70.00
11000
GUIDE
3D
North Atlantic Right Whale
3.5”-7.1” | 9-18 cm
30”-60” | 76-152 cm
80-100 lb | 36-45 kg
40-70 years
Pallid Sturgeon
18.000
152.000
45.000
70.00
1620
GUIDE
3D
Pallid Sturgeon
Red Panda
1100000
11”-13.4” | 28-34 cm
5.5”-7.1” | 14-18 cm
20”-25.2” | 51-64 cm
8-17 lb | 3.6-7.7 kg
8-22 years
Red Panda
34.000
18.000
64.000
7.700
22.00
1100000
GUIDE
3D
Red Panda
Saola
45600
40.2”-45.7” | 102-116 cm
11”-13” | 28-33 cm
46”-52.75” | 117-134 cm
175-220 lb | 80-100 kg
8-11 years (wild); 12-15 years (captivity)
Saola
116.000
33.000
134.000
100.000
15.00
45600
GUIDE
3D
Saola
Sea Otter
117000
12.2”-18.5” | 31-47 cm
10.2”-15.75” | 26-40 cm
29.5”-45.3” | 75-115 cm
31-99 lb | 14-45 kg
10-23 years
Sea Otter
47.000
40.000
115.000
45.000
23.00
117000
GUIDE
3D
Sea Otter
5.9’-8.9’ | 1.8-2.7 m
11.2’-16.1’ | 3.4-4.9 m
45’-65’ | 13.7-19.8 m
18-30 tons | 16-27 metric tons
50-75 years
Sei Whale
270.000
490.000
1980.000
27215.000
75.00
14700
GUIDE
3D
Sei Whale
22”-26” | 56-66 cm
36”-51” | 91-130 cm
75-120 lb | 34-54 kg
8-15 years (wild); 18-22 years (captivity)
Snow Leopard
66.000
130.000
54.000
22.00
121000
GUIDE
3D
Snow Leopard
4.4’-5.4’ | 1.35-1.65 m
2.5’-3.1’ | .75-.95 m
7.9’-9.8’ | 2.4-3 m
1,102-2,094 lb | 500-950 kg
30-35 years
Sumatran Rhinoceros
165.000
95.000
300.000
950.000
35.00
18300
GUIDE
3D
Sumatran Rhinoceros
13.5”-17” | 34-43 cm
22”-28” | 56-71 cm
13-18 lb | 6-8 kg
4-6 years (wild); up to 8 years (captivity)
Tasmanian Devil
43.000
71.000
8.000
8.00
127000
GUIDE
3D
Tasmanian Devil
Vaquita
186000
12”-14” | 30-36 cm
12”-15” | 30-37 cm
4’-5’ | 1.2-1.5 m
100-110 lb | 45-50 kg
20 years (average)
Vaquita
36.000
37.000
150.000
50.000
20.00
186000
GUIDE
3D
Vaquita
39”-59” | 99-150 cm (Upright)
13”-18.1” | 33-46 cm
27.2”-37.8” | 69-96 cm
88-104 lb | 40-47 kg
15-25 years (wild); 30-50 years (captivity)
Western Chimpanzee
150.000
46.000
96.000
47.000
50.00
900
GUIDE
3D
Western Chimpanzee
30’-62’ | 9.1-18.9 m
41000-50000 (20.6-25 tons) | 18600-22675 kg
70-130 years
Whale Shark
1890.000
22675.000
130.00
110000
GUIDE
3D
Whale Shark
Eastern Lowland Gorilla (Gorilla beringei graueri)
Comparison drawing of the Eastern Lowland Gorilla compared to similar Ape species at scale

The Eastern Lowland Gorilla (Gorilla beringei graueri) is the largest of the four gorilla subspecies of the Eastern Gorilla and is unique to the mountainous forest of the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo. Eastern lowland gorillas are sociable and peaceful animals that feast on a varied diet of fruits, stems and bark, and small insects. The gorillas’ coats are jet black, and the hair greys as the animal matures; this is known as ‘silverback’. Eastern lowland gorillas are critically endangered, and there is only one female eastern gorilla in captivity and can be found at the Antwerp Zoo in Belgium.

Eastern Lowland Gorillas have an upright standing height of 63”-72” (160-183 cm), height on all fours of 39.4”-45.3” (100-115 cm), body length between 37.4”-47.2” (95-120 cm), and an estimated body width of 25.2”-28” (64-71 cm). The typical weight of the Eastern Lowland Gorilla is in the range of 220-460 lb (100-210 kg). Eastern Lowland Gorillas have lifespans between 30-40 in the wild and 40-60 in captivity.

Series of dimensioned drawings of the Eastern Lowland Gorilla in front and side views
The Eastern Lowland Gorilla (Gorilla beringei graueri) is the largest of the four gorilla subspecies of the Eastern Gorilla and is unique to the mountainous forest of the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo. Eastern lowland gorillas are sociable and peaceful animals that feast on a varied diet.

Eastern Lowland Gorillas have an upright standing height of 63”-72” (160-183 cm), height on all fours of 39.4”-45.3” (100-115 cm), body length between 37.4”-47.2” (95-120 cm), and an estimated body width of 25.2”-28” (64-71 cm). The typical weight of the Eastern Lowland Gorilla is in the range of 220-460 lb (100-210 kg). Eastern Lowland Gorillas have lifespans between 30-40 in the wild and 40-60 in captivity.

Series of dimensioned drawings of the Eastern Lowland Gorilla in front and side views
Eastern Lowland Gorilla (Gorilla beringei graueri)
Height:
63”-72” | 160-183 cm (Upright)
Width:
25.2”-28” | 64-71 cm
Length:
37.4”-47.2” | 95-120 cm
Depth:
Height (All Fours)
39.4”-45.3” | 100-115 cm
Weight:
220-460 lb | 100-210 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Gorilla beringei graueri
Lifespan
30-40 (wild); 40-60 (captivity)

Drawings include:
Eastern Lowland Gorilla side elevation (assorted), front

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Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus)
Size comparison drawing of a Blue Whale compared to a person with measurements for overall length

Blue Whales are the largest known animal in the world; growing up to 98' (30 m) and weighing up to 173 tons (157,000 kgs). They can be found living in the North Atlantic, North Pacific and parts of the Southern Hemisphere. Just like their name, Blue Whales have a long-tapered body and have a bluish-grey dorsal. Blue whales don’t have teeth, but instead have large baleen which help separate sea water from krill after they swallow. After separation, the water is is filtered back out of their mouths through the baleen, while air from their lungs is expelled through their blow hole.

The typical Blue Whale has an overall height of 13’-16’ (3.96-4.88 m) and body length of 82’-105’ (25-32 m). An average Blue Whale weighs between 55-165 tons (50-150 metric tons) and has a typical lifespan of 80-90 years.

Illustrations of Blue Whales seen in various positions from the top, front and breaching
Blue Whales are the largest known animal in the world; growing up to 98 feet (30 meters) and weighing up to 173 tons (157,000 kgs). Just like their name, Blue Whales have a long-tapered body and have a bluish-grey dorsal. Blue whales don’t have teeth, but instead have large baleen systems.

The typical Blue Whale has an overall height of 13’-16’ (3.96-4.88 m) and body length of 82’-105’ (25-32 m). An average Blue Whale weighs between 55-165 tons (50-150 metric tons) and has a typical lifespan of 80-90 years.

Illustrations of Blue Whales seen in various positions from the top, front and breaching
Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus)
Height:
13’-16’ | 3.96-4.88 m
Width:
25.3’-31.8’ | 7.7-9.7 m
Length:
82’-105’ | 25-32 m
Depth:
Weight:
55-165 tons | 50-150 metric tons
Area:
Scientific Name
Balaenoptera musculus
Lifespan
80-90 years

Drawings include:
Blue Whale side elevation, front, top, breaching

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Snow Leopard (Panthera uncia)
Comparison illustration of the size of a Snow Leopard to a typical person

The Snow Leopard (Panthera uncia), also known as an ounce, is a large cat inhabiting the mountains of Central and South Asia. This stocky, short-legged cat is pale grey in color with dark spots and rosettes. Due to living in alpine environments, the Snow Leopard has many features or adaptations to provide warmth and stability.

It has broad paws for walking on snow, a dense undercoat for insulation, a long, bushy tail to cover its face when asleep and to maintain balance, and small ears to lessen heat loss. The Snow Leopard typically rest and reside by ridges in the mountains to ensure a vantage point as it prefers to ambush prey from up above.

Snow Leopards have a shoulder height between 22”-26” (56-66 cm), body length of 36”-51” (91-130 cm), and weight in the range of 75-120 lb (34-54 kg). The tail of a Snow Leopard is 31”-39” (79-99 cm) in length. Snow Leopards have a typical lifespan of 8-15 years in the wild and up to 18-22 years in captivity.

Series of side elevation illustrations of the Snow Leopard
The Snow Leopard (Panthera uncia), also known as an ounce, is a large cat inhabiting the mountains of Central and South Asia. This stocky, short-legged cat is pale grey in color with dark spots and rosettes. Due to living in cold alpine environments, the Snow Leopard has many adaptive features.

Snow Leopards have a shoulder height between 22”-26” (56-66 cm), body length of 36”-51” (91-130 cm), and weight in the range of 75-120 lb (34-54 kg). The tail of a Snow Leopard is 31”-39” (79-99 cm) in length. Snow Leopards have a typical lifespan of 8-15 years in the wild and up to 18-22 years in captivity.

Series of side elevation illustrations of the Snow Leopard
Snow Leopard (Panthera uncia)
Height:
22”-26” | 56-66 cm
Width:
Length:
36”-51” | 91-130 cm
Depth:
Withers Height
Weight:
75-120 lb | 34-54 kg
Area:
Tail Length
31”-39” | 79-99 cm
Scientific Name
Panthera uncia
Lifespan
8-15 years (wild); 18-22 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Snow Leopard side elevation (standing), front (sitting), side (lying down)

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Pallid Sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus)
Scale illustration of an average Pallid Sturgeon compared to a human and other freshwater fish species

The Pallid Sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus) gets its name from the pale coloration. It is found in the lower Mississippi river basin and the water bodies of Missouri. It has a slow growth rate but is long-lived. The Pallid sturgeon has maintained most of its primitive features and is separated from the shovelnose sturgeon by its enormous size. It is rarely seen, and very little is known about it since it is a bottom-dweller. Apart from the pale coloration on the body, the backs and sides are greyish-white, while the tail is heterocercal. The body lacks scales nor bones but is made of a cartilaginous skeleton. The head and snout are longer, making it have an extended mouth. However, it lacks teeth.

Pallid Sturgeon have a total length between 30”-60” (76-152 cm) and body height of 3.5”-7.1” (9-18 cm). The typical weight of the Pallid Sturgeon is in the range of 80-100 lb (36-45 kg). Pallid Sturgeon have lifespans between 40-70 years.

Series of elevation illustrations of the Pallid Sturgeon
The Pallid Sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus) gets its name from the pale coloration. It is found in the lower Mississippi river basin and the water bodies of Missouri. It has a slow growth rate but is long-lived. The Pallid sturgeon has maintained most of its primitive features.

Pallid Sturgeon have a total length between 30”-60” (76-152 cm) and body height of 3.5”-7.1” (9-18 cm). The typical weight of the Pallid Sturgeon is in the range of 80-100 lb (36-45 kg). Pallid Sturgeon have lifespans between 40-70 years.

Series of elevation illustrations of the Pallid Sturgeon
Pallid Sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus)
Height:
3.5”-7.1” | 9-18 cm
Width:
Length:
30”-60” | 76-152 cm
Depth:
Weight:
80-100 lb | 36-45 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Scaphirhynchus albus
Lifespan
40-70 years

Drawings include:

Pallid Sturgeon side elevation, front

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North Atlantic Right Whale (Eubalaena glacialis)
Scale illustration of an average North Atlantic Right Whale with dimensions length compared to a human and sea cows

The North Atlantic right whales are among the most endangered species in the family Balaenidae. They are slow surface-skimmers, docile, and prefer coastal waters. They live in areas of the western north Atlantic ocean beside being also called black right whale or northern whale. These mammals lack a dorsal fin, have pectoral flippers that are short and paddle-like and long arching mouths above the eyes with stocky black bodies and white blotches on their undersides. The North Atlantic right whale makes a distinctive V-shaped blow and can be identified by the shape, position, and size of their callosities, which are unique to each whale.

North Atlantic Right Whales have a total length between 43’-52’ (13.1-15.8 m), body height of 9.2’-11.1’ (2.8-3.4 m), and width of 14.8’-18’ (4.5-5.5 m). The typical weight of the North Atlantic Right Whale is in the range of 44-75 tons (40-68 metric tons). North Atlantic Right Whale have lifespans between 50-70 years.

Pair of elevation illustrations of the North Atlantic Right Whale seen from the side and front
The North Atlantic right whales are among the most endangered species in the family Balaenidae. They are slow surface-skimmers, docile, and prefer coastal waters. They live in areas of the western north Atlantic ocean beside being also called black right whale or northern whale.

North Atlantic Right Whales have a total length between 43’-52’ (13.1-15.8 m), body height of 9.2’-11.1’ (2.8-3.4 m), and width of 14.8’-18’ (4.5-5.5 m). The typical weight of the North Atlantic Right Whale is in the range of 44-75 tons (40-68 metric tons). North Atlantic Right Whale have lifespans between 50-70 years.

Pair of elevation illustrations of the North Atlantic Right Whale seen from the side and front
North Atlantic Right Whale (Eubalaena glacialis)
Height:
9.2’-11.1’ | 2.8-3.4 m
Width:
14.8’-18’ | 4.5-5.5 m
Length:
43’-52’ | 13.1-15.8 m
Depth:
Weight:
44-75 tons | 40-68 metric tons
Area:
Scientific Name
Eubalaena glacialis
Lifespan
50-70 years

Drawings include:

North Atlantic Right Whale side elevation, front, top

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