Endangered Species | Animals

The conservation status of a species indicates the species’ likelihood of becoming extinct. An endangered species is very likely to become extinct in the near future, either worldwide or in a particular jurisdiction. Endangered species are at risk due to factors like habitat loss, poaching, and invasive species.

The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List lists the global conservation status of many species. In 2012 the IUCN Red List listed 3,079 animal species and 2,655 plant species as endangered. There are laws in many nations that protect conservation-reliant species like forbidding hunting and restricting land development.

How can we protect endangered species?

We can protect endangered species by learning more about the endangered species around our surrounding communities, minimizing the use of pesticides, and reducing our consumption of water within the home. Other ways to protect endangered species include recycling, not littering, and not purchasing products that are made from endangered animal species.

What is the most endangered species in the world?

The most endangered species in the world include the southern rockhopper penguin, snow leopard, savanna elephant, polar bear, and olive ridley turtle. Other endangered animal species are the marine iguana, loggerhead turtle, and hippopotamus. The greater one-horned rhino, greater white shark, giant tortoise, giant panda, and dugong are also considered endangered animal species.

Why are species endangered?

Animal species are endangered due to loss of habitat which happens either through human actions or naturally as well as loss of genetic variation. Other reasons for species being endangered include loss of genetic variation, which can sometimes occur naturally or happen due to human activity.

Endangered Species Guides
Browse through our curated Endangered Species Guides for additional categorizations, tips, details, variations, styles, and histories of Endangered Species. Guides provide additional insights into the unique properties and shared relationships between elements.
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24”-50” | 61-127 cm
7’-15’ | 2.1-4.6 m
550–2000 lb | 250-907 kg
15-30 years
Atlantic Bluefin Tuna
127.000
460.000
907.000
30.00
4300
GUIDE
3D
Atlantic Bluefin Tuna
34”-45” | 86-114 cm
5’3”-6’5” | 160-196 cm
220-650 lb | 100-295 kg
8-10 years (wild); 18-25 years (captivity)
Bengal Tiger
114.000
196.000
295.000
25.00
45000
GUIDE
3D
Bengal Tiger
4.9’-6.2’ | 1.5-1.9 m
3’-3.6’ | .9-1.1 m
9.8’-12.3’ | 3-3.75 m
1,764-3,086 lb | 800-1,400 kg
30-50 years
Black Rhinoceros
190.000
110.000
375.000
1400.000
50.00
66000
GUIDE
3D
Black Rhinoceros
3.9”-5.9” | 10-15 cm
2.6”-3.5” | 6.5-9 cm
13”-18.1” | 33-46 cm
1.3-3.1 lb | .6-1.4 kg
4-9 years
Black-Footed Ferret
15.000
9.000
46.000
1.400
9.00
24000
GUIDE
3D
Black-Footed Ferret
13’-16’ | 3.96-4.88 m
25.3’-31.8’ | 7.7-9.7 m
82’-105’ | 25-32 m
55-165 tons | 50-150 metric tons
80-90 years
Blue Whale
488.000
970.000
3200.000
150000.000
90.00
182000
GUIDE
3D
Blue Whale
Bonobo
671800
39”-49” | 99-125 cm (Upright)
10.6”-14.2” | 27-36 cm
27.6”-32.7” | 70-83 cm
60-86 lb | 27-39 kg
20-45 years (wild); 50-58 years (captivity)
Bonobo
125.000
36.000
83.000
39.000
58.00
671800
GUIDE
3D
Bonobo
39.4”-59” | 100-150 cm (Upright)
18.9”-28” | 48-71 cm
31.9”-47.6” | 81-121 cm
110-220 lb | 50-100 kg
35-45 years (wild); 50-60 years (captivity)
Bornean Orangutan
150.000
71.000
121.000
100.000
60.00
16800
GUIDE
3D
Bornean Orangutan
63”-72” | 160-183 cm (Upright)
25.2”-28” | 64-71 cm
37.4”-47.2” | 95-120 cm
220-460 lb | 100-210 kg
30-40 (wild); 40-60 (captivity)
Eastern Lowland Gorilla
183.000
71.000
120.000
210.000
60.00
4350
GUIDE
3D
Eastern Lowland Gorilla
9.5’-11.5’ | 2.9-3.5 m
15.4’-18.4’ | 4.7-5.6 m
75’-90’ | 22.9-27.4 m
74-114 tons | 67-103 metric tons
80-100 years
Fin Whale
350.000
560.000
2740.000
103419.000
100.00
35800
GUIDE
3D
Fin Whale
18”-21” | 46-53 cm
5.5”-6.7” | 14-17 cm
3.5-6 lb | 1.6-2.7 kg
15-20 years
Galápagos Penguin
53.000
17.000
2.700
20.00
16400
GUIDE
3D
Galápagos Penguin
1’6”-3" | .46-.91 m
4’6”-6’ | 1.37-1.83 m
150-250 lb | 68-114 kg
15-25 (wild); 20-30 years (captivity)
Giant Panda Bear
91.000
183.000
114.000
30.00
307000
GUIDE
3D
Giant Panda Bear
14.2”-18.9” | 36-48 cm
27.5”-36.2” | 70-92 cm (Carapace)
36”-48” | 91-122 cm (Carapace)
243-419 lb | 110-190 kg
60-75 years (wild); 80-120 years (captivity)
Green Sea Turtle
48.000
92.000
122.000
190.000
120.00
46700
GUIDE
3D
Green Sea Turtle
9.4”-15” | 24-38 cm
17.7”-27.2” | 45-69 cm (Carapace)
24”-36” | 61-91 cm (Carapace)
99-198 lb | 45-90 kg
30-45 years (wild); 30-60 years (captivity)
Hawksbill Sea Turtle
38.000
69.000
91.000
90.000
60.00
15400
GUIDE
3D
Hawksbill Sea Turtle
6.58’-11.42’ | 2-3.5 m
3.28’-6.23’ | 1-1.9 m
8.2’-14.44’ | 2.5-4.4 m
4,409-11,023 lb | 2,000-5,500 kg
50-80 years
Indian Elephant
350.000
190.000
440.000
5500.000
80.00
61700
GUIDE
3D
Indian Elephant
16”-19” | 42-49 cm
19”-22” | 48-56 cm
7’-8.17’ | 2.13-2.49 m
154-243 lb | 70-110 kg
18-26 years
Indus River Dolphin
49.000
56.000
249.000
110.000
26.00
4500
GUIDE
3D
Indus River Dolphin
14”-21” | 36-54 cm
15”-23” | 39-59 cm
5.92’-9’ | 1.8-2.74 m
198-441 lb | 90-200 kg
15-30 years
Irrawaddy Dolphin
54.000
59.000
274.000
200.000
30.00
23400
GUIDE
3D
Irrawaddy Dolphin
4.9’-5.6’ | 1.5-1.7 m
3’-3.3’ | .9-1 m
9.8’-11.2’ | 3-3.4 m
3,307-4,409 lb | 1,500-2,000 kg
30-45 years
Javan Rhinoceros
170.000
100.000
340.000
2000.000
45.00
29700
GUIDE
3D
Javan Rhinoceros
55”-67” | 140-170 cm (Upright)
24”-29.1” | 61-74 cm
37.4”-45.3” | 95-115 cm
154-419 lb | 70-190 kg
35-40 years (wild); 40-50 years (captivity)
Mountain Gorilla
170.000
74.000
115.000
190.000
50.00
27250
GUIDE
3D
Mountain Gorilla
9.2’-11.1’ | 2.8-3.4 m
14.8’-18’ | 4.5-5.5 m
43’-52’ | 13.1-15.8 m
44-75 tons | 40-68 metric tons
50-70 years
North Atlantic Right Whale
340.000
550.000
1580.000
68039.000
70.00
11000
GUIDE
3D
North Atlantic Right Whale
3.5”-7.1” | 9-18 cm
30”-60” | 76-152 cm
80-100 lb | 36-45 kg
40-70 years
Pallid Sturgeon
18.000
152.000
45.000
70.00
1620
GUIDE
3D
Pallid Sturgeon
Red Panda
1100000
11”-13.4” | 28-34 cm
5.5”-7.1” | 14-18 cm
20”-25.2” | 51-64 cm
8-17 lb | 3.6-7.7 kg
8-22 years
Red Panda
34.000
18.000
64.000
7.700
22.00
1100000
GUIDE
3D
Red Panda
Saola
45600
40.2”-45.7” | 102-116 cm
11”-13” | 28-33 cm
46”-52.75” | 117-134 cm
175-220 lb | 80-100 kg
8-11 years (wild); 12-15 years (captivity)
Saola
116.000
33.000
134.000
100.000
15.00
45600
GUIDE
3D
Saola
Sea Otter
117000
12.2”-18.5” | 31-47 cm
10.2”-15.75” | 26-40 cm
29.5”-45.3” | 75-115 cm
31-99 lb | 14-45 kg
10-23 years
Sea Otter
47.000
40.000
115.000
45.000
23.00
117000
GUIDE
3D
Sea Otter
5.9’-8.9’ | 1.8-2.7 m
11.2’-16.1’ | 3.4-4.9 m
45’-65’ | 13.7-19.8 m
18-30 tons | 16-27 metric tons
50-75 years
Sei Whale
270.000
490.000
1980.000
27215.000
75.00
14700
GUIDE
3D
Sei Whale
22”-26” | 56-66 cm
36”-51” | 91-130 cm
75-120 lb | 34-54 kg
8-15 years (wild); 18-22 years (captivity)
Snow Leopard
66.000
130.000
54.000
22.00
121000
GUIDE
3D
Snow Leopard
4.4’-5.4’ | 1.35-1.65 m
2.5’-3.1’ | .75-.95 m
7.9’-9.8’ | 2.4-3 m
1,102-2,094 lb | 500-950 kg
30-35 years
Sumatran Rhinoceros
165.000
95.000
300.000
950.000
35.00
18300
GUIDE
3D
Sumatran Rhinoceros
13.5”-17” | 34-43 cm
22”-28” | 56-71 cm
13-18 lb | 6-8 kg
4-6 years (wild); up to 8 years (captivity)
Tasmanian Devil
43.000
71.000
8.000
8.00
127000
GUIDE
3D
Tasmanian Devil
Vaquita
186000
12”-14” | 30-36 cm
12”-15” | 30-37 cm
4’-5’ | 1.2-1.5 m
100-110 lb | 45-50 kg
20 years (average)
Vaquita
36.000
37.000
150.000
50.000
20.00
186000
GUIDE
3D
Vaquita
39”-59” | 99-150 cm (Upright)
13”-18.1” | 33-46 cm
27.2”-37.8” | 69-96 cm
88-104 lb | 40-47 kg
15-25 years (wild); 30-50 years (captivity)
Western Chimpanzee
150.000
46.000
96.000
47.000
50.00
900
GUIDE
3D
Western Chimpanzee
30’-62’ | 9.1-18.9 m
41000-50000 (20.6-25 tons) | 18600-22675 kg
70-130 years
Whale Shark
1890.000
22675.000
130.00
110000
GUIDE
3D
Whale Shark
Giant Panda Bear (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)
Illustration comparing the size of an average Giant Panda Bear to a human person

The Giant Panda, also known simply as panda or panda bear, is a peaceful creature with a distinctive black and white coat which resides primarily in the mountains of Western China. Due to deforestation and habitat loss, the Giant Panda is a conservation reliant species, although as of 2016 the Giant Panda moved from the endangered list to the vulnerable list. Even though the Giant Panda belongs to the Carnivora order, its diet (26 to 84 pounds of food daily) is 99% comprised of bamboo shoots. Despite its large size, the Giant Panda is only about the size of a stick of butter, 1/900th of its full size, when it is first born.

Male Giant Panda Bears have a shoulder height between 2’-3’ (.61-.91 m) and a weight in the range of 185-250 lb (84-114 kg). The shoulder heights of females are between 1’6”-2’6” (46-76 cm) with weights from 150-225 lb (68-102 kg). The Giant Panda Bear has an overall body length of roughly 4’6”-6’ (1.37-1.83 m), standing height of 4’8”-6’ (1.42-1.83 m), and a typical lifespan of 15-25 years in the wild, or 20-30 years in captivity.

Collection of drawings of a Giant Panda Bear in various resting positions of sitting or laying down
The Giant Panda, also known simply as panda or panda bear, is a peaceful creature with a distinctive black and white coat which resides primarily in the mountains of Western China. Even though the Giant Panda belongs to the Carnivora order, its diet is 99% comprised of bamboo shoots.

Male Giant Panda Bears have a shoulder height between 2’-3’ (.61-.91 m) and a weight in the range of 185-250 lb (84-114 kg). The shoulder heights of females are between 1’6”-2’6” (46-76 cm) with weights from 150-225 lb (68-102 kg). The Giant Panda Bear has an overall body length of roughly 4’6”-6’ (1.37-1.83 m), standing height of 4’8”-6’ (1.42-1.83 m), and a typical lifespan of 15-25 years in the wild, or 20-30 years in captivity.

Collection of drawings of a Giant Panda Bear in various resting positions of sitting or laying down
Giant Panda Bear (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)
Height:
1’6”-3" | .46-.91 m
Width:
Length:
4’6”-6’ | 1.37-1.83 m
Depth:
Standing Height
Weight:
150-250 lb | 68-114 kg
Area:

Male:
Height (Shoulder): 2’-3’ | 61-91 cm
Length: 5’-6’ | 152-183 cm
Weight: 175-250 lb | 79-114 kg

Female:
Height (Shoulder):
1’6”-2’6” | 46-76 cm
Length: 4’6”-5’6” | 137-168 cm
Weight (Female):
150-225 lb | 68-102 kg

Scientific Name
Ailuropoda melanoleuca
Lifespan
15-25 (wild); 20-30 years (captivity)

Drawings include:
Giant Panda Bear side elevation (standing), side (woman peace sign), front (standing), front (sitting), back (sitting), side (laying down), side (standing upright)

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Galápagos Penguin (Spheniscus mendiculus)
Comparison drawing of the Galápagos Penguin compared to other similar penguins and a person

The Galápagos Penguin (Spheniscus mendiculus) is the only penguin found close to the equator. It inhabits the Galápagos island in Ecuador. It is a banded penguin and among the smallest globally, possessing various adaptations to help it stay cool in its warm environment. The head and the upper part of the body are black, but a few white stripes run along the body's length while the underside and frontal area are white. Its extremely narrow head stripe separates it from other banded penguins. In addition, it has feathers on its back and flippers. The Galápagos Penguin shows unique nesting behavior like using any resource to build a nest, including stealing components like pebbles and sticks from absent neighbors.

Galápagos Penguins have an overall height between 18”-21” (46-53 cm) and body width of 5.5”-6.7” (14-17 cm). The typical weight of the Galápagos Penguin is in the range of 3.5-6 lb (1.6-2.7 kg). Galápagos Penguins have lifespans between 15-20 years.

Set of scaled elevation drawings of the Galápagos Penguin viewed from the side and front
The Galápagos Penguin (Spheniscus mendiculus) is the only penguin found close to the equator. It inhabits the Galápagos island in Ecuador. It is a banded penguin and among the smallest globally, possessing various adaptations to help it stay cool in its warm environment.

Galápagos Penguins have an overall height between 18”-21” (46-53 cm) and body width of 5.5”-6.7” (14-17 cm). The typical weight of the Galápagos Penguin is in the range of 3.5-6 lb (1.6-2.7 kg). Galápagos Penguins have lifespans between 15-20 years.

Set of scaled elevation drawings of the Galápagos Penguin viewed from the side and front
Galápagos Penguin (Spheniscus mendiculus)
Height:
18”-21” | 46-53 cm
Width:
5.5”-6.7” | 14-17 cm
Length:
Depth:
Weight:
3.5-6 lb | 1.6-2.7 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Spheniscus mendiculus
Lifespan
15-20 years

Drawings include:

Galápagos Penguin side elevations, front, back

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Western Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes verus)
Comparison drawing of the Western Chimpanzee compared to similar Ape species at scale

The Western Chimpanzee, or masked chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes verus) is a medium-sized chimp native to western Africa (as their name suggests). They are identifiable by their bare faces, hands, and feet. Their hands are more evolved than ours, with long fingers that help them climb. Western Chimpanzees are omnivores and love meat. They will even hunt together for birds or other monkeys. They are evolutionarily related to humans and will even sometimes go partially bald with age, or grow grey hair, just like us. Also like us, they use tools. Some even make wooden spears to hunt with, and go swimming to cool down.

Western Chimpanzees have an upright standing height of 39”-59” (99-150 cm), height on all fours of 23.6”-33.5” (60-85 cm), body length between 27.2”-37.8” (69-96 cm), and an estimated body width of 13”-18.1” (33-46 cm). The typical weight of the Western Chimpanzee is in the range of 88-104 lb (40-47 kg). Western Chimpanzees have lifespans between 15-25 years in the wild and 30-50 years in captivity.

Series of dimensioned drawings of the Western Chimpanzee in front and side views
The Western Chimpanzee, or masked chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes verus) is a medium-sized chimp native to western Africa (as their name suggests). They are identifiable by their bare faces, hands, and feet. Their hands are more evolved than ours, with long fingers that help them climb.

Western Chimpanzees have an upright standing height of 39”-59” (99-150 cm), height on all fours of 23.6”-33.5” (60-85 cm), body length between 27.2”-37.8” (69-96 cm), and an estimated body width of 13”-18.1” (33-46 cm). The typical weight of the Western Chimpanzee is in the range of 88-104 lb (40-47 kg). Western Chimpanzees have lifespans between 15-25 years in the wild and 30-50 years in captivity.

Series of dimensioned drawings of the Western Chimpanzee in front and side views
Western Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes verus)
Height:
39”-59” | 99-150 cm (Upright)
Width:
13”-18.1” | 33-46 cm
Length:
27.2”-37.8” | 69-96 cm
Depth:
Height (All Fours)
23.6”-33.5” | 60-85 cm
Weight:
88-104 lb | 40-47 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Pan troglodytes verus
Lifespan
15-25 years (wild); 30-50 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Western Chimpanzee side elevation (assorted), front

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Sea Otter (Enhydra lutris)
Scale illustration of an average Sea Otter compared to other species of Mustelids

The Sea Otter, Enhydra lutris, is a marine mammal that resides on the coasts of the northern and eastern North Pacific Ocean; while the sea otter can walk on land, it is able to live exclusively in the ocean. Its thick coat of fur aids in insulation, and it is the densest in the animal kingdom. It is one of the few mammal species to use tools to forage and eat; its prey include sea urchins, mollusks, crustaceans, and some types of fish. Some of these species of fish are also valued by humans as food, and this can lead to conflicts between sea otters and fisheries.

The Sea Otter has a body length in the range of 29.5”-45.3” (75-115 cm) and total weight of 31-99 lb (14-45 kg). Sea Otters have a shoulder height between 12.2”-18.5” (31-47 cm), body width of 10.2”-15.75” (26-40 cm), and tail length of 9.8”-13.8” (25-35 cm). The typical lifespan of the Sea Otter is between 10-23 years.

Pair of elevation illustrations of the Sea Otter seen from the side and front
The Sea Otter, Enhydra lutris, is a marine mammal that resides on the coasts of the northern and eastern North Pacific Ocean; while the sea otter can walk on land, it is able to live exclusively in the ocean. Its thick coat of fur aids in insulation, and it is the densest in the animal kingdom.

The Sea Otter has a body length in the range of 29.5”-45.3” (75-115 cm) and total weight of 31-99 lb (14-45 kg). Sea Otters have a shoulder height between 12.2”-18.5” (31-47 cm), body width of 10.2”-15.75” (26-40 cm), and tail length of 9.8”-13.8” (25-35 cm). The typical lifespan of the Sea Otter is between 10-23 years.

Pair of elevation illustrations of the Sea Otter seen from the side and front
Sea Otter (Enhydra lutris)
Height:
12.2”-18.5” | 31-47 cm
Width:
10.2”-15.75” | 26-40 cm
Length:
29.5”-45.3” | 75-115 cm
Depth:
Weight:
31-99 lb | 14-45 kg
Area:

Tail Length: 9.8”-13.8” | 25-35 cm

Scientific Name
Enhydra lutris
Lifespan
10-23 years

Drawings include:

Sea Otter side elevation (assorted), front

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Sei Whale (Balaenoptera borealis)
Scale illustration of an average Sei Whale with dimensions length compared to a human and sea cows

Sei whales compare to the cheetah because of their ability to sprint and tire quickly. They are the fourth-largest rorqual when compared to other baleen relatives and prefer deep offshore waters. They fall under the family Balaenopteridae or ”winged whales” inhabiting most oceans except the equatorial waters and cold polar regions. They have a lifespan of 70 years and migrate annually. Sei whales are identified by a distinctive upright dorsal fin near their posterior with a white coating on their underside and bodies covered in oval-shaped scars. These animals prefer to travel solo or in small pods and sink below the surface rather than arch their backs when diving like other baleen whales.

Sei Whales have a total length between 45’-65’ (13.7-19.8 m), body height of 5.9’-8.9’ (1.8-2.7 m), and width of 11.2’-16.1’ (3.4-4.9 m). The typical weight of the Sei Whale is in the range of 18-30 tons (16-27 metric tons). Sei Whale have lifespans between 50-75 years.

Pair of elevation illustrations of the Sei Whale seen from the side and front
Sei whales compare to the cheetah because of their ability to sprint and tire quickly. They are the fourth-largest rorqual when compared to other baleen relatives and prefer deep offshore waters. They fall under the family Balaenopteridae or ”winged whales” inhabiting most oceans except the equator.

Sei Whales have a total length between 45’-65’ (13.7-19.8 m), body height of 5.9’-8.9’ (1.8-2.7 m), and width of 11.2’-16.1’ (3.4-4.9 m). The typical weight of the Sei Whale is in the range of 18-30 tons (16-27 metric tons). Sei Whale have lifespans between 50-75 years.

Pair of elevation illustrations of the Sei Whale seen from the side and front
Sei Whale (Balaenoptera borealis)
Height:
5.9’-8.9’ | 1.8-2.7 m
Width:
11.2’-16.1’ | 3.4-4.9 m
Length:
45’-65’ | 13.7-19.8 m
Depth:
Weight:
18-30 tons | 16-27 metric tons
Area:
Scientific Name
Balaenoptera borealis
Lifespan
50-75 years

Drawings include:

Sei Whale side elevation, front, top

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