Marsupials | Marsupialia

Marsupials are mammals characterized by the pouch the mother has for raising and protecting her young, also known as joeys. Marsupials are most commonly associated with Austrailia, because that’s where the well-known Kangaroos and Koalas are found, but marsupials, specifically the opposum, are also found in North, Central, and South America. Some species of marsupials are herbivores, while others are insectivores or carnivores. Marsupials typically live alone, except in the mating season, and the females will raise the joeys alone. Most marsupial mothers, expect for the Kangaroo and Koala, give birth to multiple young at a time. Marsupials play an important role in their environment: they spread seeds, pollinates, eat pests and vermin, and can aid the creation of habitats for other creatures by helping to loosen up soil for burrowing animals.

What do marsupials eat?

A marsupials’ diet depends on its species, teeth, and habitat. Marsupials can be omnivores, herbivores, carnivores, or insectivores. For example, bandicoots, Australian possums, and American opossums are omnivores, while wombat, kangaroos, and koalas are herbivores. Marsupials typically eat bugs, smaller mammals, birds, fruit, seeds, and eucalyptus leaves.

Why do marsupials have pouches?

Marsupials have pouches that are essential for the well-being of their offspring. After birth marsupials climb into the pouch and then latch into their mother’s nipple. The offspring continues to develop for 6 months inside pouch after birth, and receives the nursing and care required to later survive on its own.

Where do marsupials live?

Marsupials live in Australia, as well as North, Central, and South America. They are not picky with their habitats. They typically live in forests, savannas, and shrublands. Some species of marsupials live in desert-like habitats while some live in burrows.

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Marsupials Guides
Browse through our curated Marsupials Guides for additional categorizations, tips, details, variations, styles, and histories of Marsupials. Guides provide additional insights into the unique properties and shared relationships between elements.
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34”-40” | 86-102 cm
28”-33” | 71-84 cm
20-60 lb | 9-27 kg
10-14 years (wild); up to 15-17 years (captivity)
Agile Wallaby
102.000
84.000
27.000
17.00
67000
3D
Agile Wallaby
8”-13” | 20-33 cm
14”-24” | 36-61 cm
6.5-15 lb | 3-7 kg
8-11 years (wild); up to 17 years (captivity)
Common Spotted Cuscus
33.000
61.000
7.000
17.00
6700
3D
Common Spotted Cuscus
24”-28” | 61-71 cm
40”-45” | 102-114 cm
45-75 lb | 20-34 kg
5-12 years (wild); up to 20-30 years (captivity)
Common Wombat
71.000
114.000
34.000
30.00
149000
3D
Common Wombat
Koala
148000
15”-23” | 38-58
24”-36” | 61-91 cm
9-20 lb | 4-9 kg
8-12 years (wild); up to 16-20 years (captivity)
Koala
58.000
91.000
9.000
20.00
148000
3D
Koala
6”-8.5” | 15-22 cm
12”-17” | 31-43 cm
1.6-3.3 lb | .7-1.5 kg
2-4 years (wild); up to 5-6 years (captivity)
Long-Nosed Bandicoot
22.000
43.000
1.500
6.00
44000
3D
Long-Nosed Bandicoot
Numbat
11000
5”-7” | 13-18 cm
8”-11.5” | 20-29 cm
.6-1.25 lb | .3-.6 kg
4-5 years (wild); up to 8 years (captivity)
Numbat
18.000
29.000
0.600
8.00
11000
3D
Numbat
Quokka
190000
9.5”-13” | 24-33 cm
16”-21” | 41-53 cm
5-11 lb | 2.3-5 kg
8-12 years (wild); up to 13-15 years (captivity)
Quokka
33.000
53.000
5.000
15.00
190000
3D
Quokka
4’10”-6’10” | 147-208 cm
39”-63” | 99-160 cm
50-200 lb | 23-91 kg
8-16 years (wild); up to 25-27 years (captivity)
Red Kangaroo
208.000
160.000
91.000
27.00
132000
3D
Red Kangaroo
13.5”-17” | 34-43 cm
22”-28” | 56-71 cm
13-18 lb | 6-8 kg
4-6 years (wild); up to 8 years (captivity)
Tasmanian Devil
43.000
71.000
8.000
8.00
127000
3D
Tasmanian Devil
20”-27” | 51-69 cm
39”-51” | 99-130 cm
35-65 lb | 16-29 kg
5-7 years (wild); up to 8-11 years (captivity)
Thylacine
69.000
130.000
29.000
11.00
44000
3D
Thylacine
8”-11” | 20-28 cm
14”-19” | 36-48 cm
4-14 lb | 2-6 kg
2-4 years (wild); up to 6 years (captivity)
Virginia Opossum
28.000
48.000
6.000
6.00
8900
3D
Virginia Opossum
32”-58” | 81-147 cm
30”-55” | 75-140 cm
40-120 lb | 18-54 kg
12-18 years (wild); up to 20-22 years (captivity)
Wallaroo
147.000
140.000
54.000
22.00
7000
3D
Wallaroo
Long-Nosed Bandicoot

The Long-Nosed Bandicoot (Perameles nasuta) is a solitary and mainly nocturnal marsupial omnivore found in the regions of Australia, Tasmania, New Guinea, and neighboring islands. The Bandicoot’s body can be small to large-sized, characterized as portly and coarse-haired.

It has sharp teeth, a narrow snout, and hind legs that extend longer than its front limbs. In search for plants and insects, the Long-Nosed Bandicoot will dig funnel-shaped holes, often finding themselves deemed as pests by farmers for digging in fields and pastures. Types of Bandicoots include the long-nosed, short-nosed, pig-footed, and rabbit-eared (also known as bilbies).

Long-Nosed Bandicoots have a shoulder height of 6”-8.5” (15-22 cm), body length between 12”-17” (31-43 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 1.6-3.3 lb (.7-1.5 kg). The tail of the Long-Nosed Bandicoot is 5”-6” (13-15 cm) in length. Long-Nosed Bandicoots have a typical lifespan of 2-4 years in the wild and up to 5-6 years in captivity.

Collection of scaled drawings of Long-nosed Bandicoot in various poses
The Long-Nosed Bandicoot (Perameles nasuta) is a solitary and mainly nocturnal marsupial omnivore found in the regions of Australia, Tasmania, New Guinea, and neighboring islands. The Bandicoot’s body can be small to large-sized, characterized as portly and coarse-haired.

Long-Nosed Bandicoots have a shoulder height of 6”-8.5” (15-22 cm), body length between 12”-17” (31-43 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 1.6-3.3 lb (.7-1.5 kg). The tail of the Long-Nosed Bandicoot is 5”-6” (13-15 cm) in length. Long-Nosed Bandicoots have a typical lifespan of 2-4 years in the wild and up to 5-6 years in captivity.

Collection of scaled drawings of Long-nosed Bandicoot in various poses
Long-Nosed Bandicoot
Height:
6”-8.5” | 15-22 cm
Width:
Length:
12”-17” | 31-43 cm
Depth:
Weight:
1.6-3.3 lb | .7-1.5 kg
Area:
Tail Length
5”-6” | 13-15 cm
Scientific Name
Perameles nasuta
Lifespan
2-4 years (wild); up to 5-6 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Long-Nosed Bandicoot side elevation (standing), front (standing)

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Thylacine | Tasmanian Tiger
Dimensioned comparison drawing of the Thylacine compared to an average person

The Thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus), now extinct, was one of the largest known carnivorous marsupials. It is commonly known as the Tasmanian Tiger or the Tasmanian Wolf for their canid-like traits and striped lower back. The species was native to Tasmania, New Guinea, and Australia, but the observations made of the animal were made when it was in captivity, and only limited, anecdotal evidence exists of the Thylacine’s behavior in the wild. The Thylacine had a stiff tail, abdominal pouch similar to a kangaroo’s, dark transverse stripes, and round erect ears covered in short fur. It preyed on kanagroos, wallabies and wombats, and birds and other small animals.

Thylacines have a shoulder height of 20”-27” (51-69 cm), body length between 39”-51” (99-130 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 35-65 lb (16-29 kg). The tail of the Thylacine is 20”-26” (51-66 cm) in length. Thylacines have a typical lifespan of 5-7 years in the wild and up to 8-11 years in captivity.

Set of standing side elevation drawings of the Thylacine
The Thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus), now extinct, was one of the largest known carnivorous marsupials. It is commonly known as the Tasmanian Tiger or the Tasmanian Wolf for their canid-like traits and striped lower back. The species was native to Tasmania, New Guinea, and Australia.

Thylacines have a shoulder height of 20”-27” (51-69 cm), body length between 39”-51” (99-130 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 35-65 lb (16-29 kg). The tail of the Thylacine is 20”-26” (51-66 cm) in length. Thylacines have a typical lifespan of 5-7 years in the wild and up to 8-11 years in captivity.

Set of standing side elevation drawings of the Thylacine
Thylacine | Tasmanian Tiger
Height:
20”-27” | 51-69 cm
Width:
Length:
39”-51” | 99-130 cm
Depth:
Weight:
35-65 lb | 16-29 kg
Area:
Tail Length
20”-26” | 51-66 cm
Scientific Name
Thylacinus cynocephalus
Lifespan
5-7 years (wild); up to 8-11 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Thylacine side elevation (standing), front (standing), side (sitting)

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Koala

The Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus), also known as the Koala Bear, is a solitary marsupial who inhabits the eucalypt woodlands, with the extent of its home covering more than a dozen trees. The Koala has a stout gray body, cream chest, large round head, fluffy ears, and a leathery nose likened to the shape of a spoon.

Due to their strict and selective diet consisting entirely on the leaves of eucalyptus trees, the Koala is left nutrient deficient. The result is a sedentary life for this marsupial, filled with long hours of sleeping and sitting exposed amongst the trees.

Koalas have a shoulder height of 15”-23” (38-58 cm), body length between 24”-36” (61-91 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 9-20 lb (4-9 kg). The tail of the Koala is .4”-.75” (1-2 cm) in length. Koalas have a typical lifespan of 8-12 years in the wild and up to 16-20 years when raised in captivity.

Set of elevation drawings of the Koala climbing and sitting
The Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus), also known as the Koala Bear, is a solitary marsupial who inhabits the eucalypt woodlands, with the extent of its home covering more than a dozen trees. The Koala has a stout gray body, cream chest, large round head, fluffy ears, and a leathery nose.

Koalas have a shoulder height of 15”-23” (38-58 cm), body length between 24”-36” (61-91 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 9-20 lb (4-9 kg). The tail of the Koala is .4”-.75” (1-2 cm) in length. Koalas have a typical lifespan of 8-12 years in the wild and up to 16-20 years when raised in captivity.

Set of elevation drawings of the Koala climbing and sitting
Koala
Height:
15”-23” | 38-58
Width:
Length:
24”-36” | 61-91 cm
Depth:
Weight:
9-20 lb | 4-9 kg
Area:
Tail Length
.4”-.75” | 1-2 cm
Scientific Name
Phascolarctos cinereus
Lifespan
8-12 years (wild); up to 16-20 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Koala side elevation (sitting), front (standing), front (walking), side (walking), side (climbing)

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Quokka

The Quokka (Setonix brachyurus), a kind of wallaby, is a herbivorous and mainly nocturnal marsupial found on the islands off the west coast of Australia. Around the size of a domestic cat, the Quokka has a brown stocky body, round ears, and a short head. Although small in size, this marsupial is able to climb trees and shrubs up to five feet tall. Unafraid of human interaction, the Quokka has a reputation of being the happiest animal on Earth.

Quokkas have a shoulder height of 9.5”-13” (24-33 cm), body length between 16”-21” (41-53 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 5-11 lb (2.3-5 kg). The tail of the Quokka is 9.5”-12” (24-31 cm) in length. Quokkas have a typical lifespan of 8-12 years in the wild and up to 13-15 years in captivity.

Series of dimensioned side elevation illustrations of the Quokka
The Quokka (Setonix brachyurus), a kind of wallaby, is a herbivorous and mainly nocturnal marsupial found on the islands off the west coast of Australia. Around the size of a domestic cat, the Quokka has a brown stocky body, round ears, and a short head.

Quokkas have a shoulder height of 9.5”-13” (24-33 cm), body length between 16”-21” (41-53 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 5-11 lb (2.3-5 kg). The tail of the Quokka is 9.5”-12” (24-31 cm) in length. Quokkas have a typical lifespan of 8-12 years in the wild and up to 13-15 years in captivity.

Series of dimensioned side elevation illustrations of the Quokka
Quokka
Height:
9.5”-13” | 24-33 cm
Width:
Length:
16”-21” | 41-53 cm
Depth:
Weight:
5-11 lb | 2.3-5 kg
Area:
Tail Length
9.5”-12” | 24-31 cm
Scientific Name
Setonix brachyurus
Lifespan
8-12 years (wild); up to 13-15 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Quokka side elevation (standing), front (standing), side (standing)

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Numbat

The Numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus) is a marsupial that lives in areas of eucalypt forests in Western Australia; the species has been recently reintroduced to South Australia. The Numbat has a finely pointed muzzle and a prominent, bushy tail. They vary considerably in color from soft gray to red-brown, and there is often an area of brick red on the upper back. A black stripe runs from the tip of the muzzle through the eyes, to the bases of the small, round-tipped ears. There are between four and eleven white stripes across the animal’s hindquarters. As insectivores, the Numbat mostly eats termites.

Numbats have a shoulder height of 5”-7” (13-18 cm), body length between 8”-11.5” (20-29 cm), and an overall weight in the range of .6-1.25 lb (.3-.6 kg). The tail of the Numbat is 4.5”-8” (12-21 cm_ in length. Numbats have a typical lifespan of 4-5 years in the wild and up to 8 years in captivity.

Series of side and front elevation illustrations of the Numbat with length and height measurements
The Numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus) is a marsupial that lives in areas of eucalypt forests in Western Australia; the species has been recently reintroduced to South Australia. The Numbat has a finely pointed muzzle and a prominent, bushy tail. They vary in color from soft gray to red-brown.

Numbats have a shoulder height of 5”-7” (13-18 cm), body length between 8”-11.5” (20-29 cm), and an overall weight in the range of .6-1.25 lb (.3-.6 kg). The tail of the Numbat is 4.5”-8” (12-21 cm_ in length. Numbats have a typical lifespan of 4-5 years in the wild and up to 8 years in captivity.

Series of side and front elevation illustrations of the Numbat with length and height measurements
Numbat
Height:
5”-7” | 13-18 cm
Width:
Length:
8”-11.5” | 20-29 cm
Depth:
Weight:
.6-1.25 lb | .3-.6 kg
Area:
Tail Length
4.5”-8” | 12-21 cm
Scientific Name
Myrmecobius fasciatus
Lifespan
4-5 years (wild); up to 8 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Numbat side elevation (standing), front (standing), side (upright), side (sitting)

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