Marsupials | Marsupialia

Marsupials are mammals characterized by the pouch the mother has for raising and protecting her young, also known as joeys. Marsupials are most commonly associated with Austrailia, because that’s where the well-known Kangaroos and Koalas are found, but marsupials, specifically the opposum, are also found in North, Central, and South America. Some species of marsupials are herbivores, while others are insectivores or carnivores. Marsupials typically live alone, except in the mating season, and the females will raise the joeys alone. Most marsupial mothers, expect for the Kangaroo and Koala, give birth to multiple young at a time. Marsupials play an important role in their environment: they spread seeds, pollinates, eat pests and vermin, and can aid the creation of habitats for other creatures by helping to loosen up soil for burrowing animals.

What do marsupials eat?

A marsupials’ diet depends on its species, teeth, and habitat. Marsupials can be omnivores, herbivores, carnivores, or insectivores. For example, bandicoots, Australian possums, and American opossums are omnivores, while wombat, kangaroos, and koalas are herbivores. Marsupials typically eat bugs, smaller mammals, birds, fruit, seeds, and eucalyptus leaves.

Why do marsupials have pouches?

Marsupials have pouches that are essential for the well-being of their offspring. After birth marsupials climb into the pouch and then latch into their mother’s nipple. The offspring continues to develop for 6 months inside pouch after birth, and receives the nursing and care required to later survive on its own.

Where do marsupials live?

Marsupials live in Australia, as well as North, Central, and South America. They are not picky with their habitats. They typically live in forests, savannas, and shrublands. Some species of marsupials live in desert-like habitats while some live in burrows.

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Marsupials Guides
Browse through our curated Marsupials Guides for additional categorizations, tips, details, variations, styles, and histories of Marsupials. Guides provide additional insights into the unique properties and shared relationships between elements.
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34”-40” | 86-102 cm
28”-33” | 71-84 cm
20-60 lb | 9-27 kg
10-14 years (wild); up to 15-17 years (captivity)
Agile Wallaby
102.000
84.000
27.000
17.00
67000
3D
Agile Wallaby
8”-13” | 20-33 cm
14”-24” | 36-61 cm
6.5-15 lb | 3-7 kg
8-11 years (wild); up to 17 years (captivity)
Common Spotted Cuscus
33.000
61.000
7.000
17.00
6700
3D
Common Spotted Cuscus
24”-28” | 61-71 cm
40”-45” | 102-114 cm
45-75 lb | 20-34 kg
5-12 years (wild); up to 20-30 years (captivity)
Common Wombat
71.000
114.000
34.000
30.00
149000
3D
Common Wombat
Koala
148000
15”-23” | 38-58
24”-36” | 61-91 cm
9-20 lb | 4-9 kg
8-12 years (wild); up to 16-20 years (captivity)
Koala
58.000
91.000
9.000
20.00
148000
3D
Koala
6”-8.5” | 15-22 cm
12”-17” | 31-43 cm
1.6-3.3 lb | .7-1.5 kg
2-4 years (wild); up to 5-6 years (captivity)
Long-Nosed Bandicoot
22.000
43.000
1.500
6.00
44000
3D
Long-Nosed Bandicoot
Numbat
11000
5”-7” | 13-18 cm
8”-11.5” | 20-29 cm
.6-1.25 lb | .3-.6 kg
4-5 years (wild); up to 8 years (captivity)
Numbat
18.000
29.000
0.600
8.00
11000
3D
Numbat
Quokka
190000
9.5”-13” | 24-33 cm
16”-21” | 41-53 cm
5-11 lb | 2.3-5 kg
8-12 years (wild); up to 13-15 years (captivity)
Quokka
33.000
53.000
5.000
15.00
190000
3D
Quokka
4’10”-6’10” | 147-208 cm
39”-63” | 99-160 cm
50-200 lb | 23-91 kg
8-16 years (wild); up to 25-27 years (captivity)
Red Kangaroo
208.000
160.000
91.000
27.00
132000
3D
Red Kangaroo
13.5”-17” | 34-43 cm
22”-28” | 56-71 cm
13-18 lb | 6-8 kg
4-6 years (wild); up to 8 years (captivity)
Tasmanian Devil
43.000
71.000
8.000
8.00
127000
3D
Tasmanian Devil
20”-27” | 51-69 cm
39”-51” | 99-130 cm
35-65 lb | 16-29 kg
5-7 years (wild); up to 8-11 years (captivity)
Thylacine
69.000
130.000
29.000
11.00
44000
3D
Thylacine
8”-11” | 20-28 cm
14”-19” | 36-48 cm
4-14 lb | 2-6 kg
2-4 years (wild); up to 6 years (captivity)
Virginia Opossum
28.000
48.000
6.000
6.00
8900
3D
Virginia Opossum
32”-58” | 81-147 cm
30”-55” | 75-140 cm
40-120 lb | 18-54 kg
12-18 years (wild); up to 20-22 years (captivity)
Wallaroo
147.000
140.000
54.000
22.00
7000
3D
Wallaroo
Wallaroo
Dimensioned comparison drawing of the Wallaroo compared to an average person

The Wallaroo (Osphranter robustus) also called the euro, is a mammal that is similar to the kangaroo. The Wallaroo looks like a mix between the wallaby and kangaroo. They are native to Australia. Their diet mainly consists of grasses and shrubs. The Wallaroo is mostly nocturnal and solitary. During mating process, the two males fight to gain the attention of the female. As a Wallaroo’s teeth wear down, they will fall out. New teeth will then appear that will push the whole row forward.

Wallaroos have a standing height of 32”-58” (81-147 cm), body length between 30”-55” (75-140 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 40-120 lb (18-54 kg). The tail of the Wallaroo is 29”-36” (75-90 cm) in length. Wallaroos have a typical lifespan of 12-18 years in the wild and up to 20-22 years in captivity.

Set of dimensioned standing side elevation drawings of the Wallaroo
The Wallaroo (Osphranter robustus) also called the euro, is a mammal that is similar to the kangaroo. The Wallaroo looks like a mix between the wallaby and kangaroo. They are native to Australia. Their diet mainly consists of grasses and shrubs. The Wallaroo is mostly nocturnal and solitary.

Wallaroos have a standing height of 32”-58” (81-147 cm), body length between 30”-55” (75-140 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 40-120 lb (18-54 kg). The tail of the Wallaroo is 29”-36” (75-90 cm) in length. Wallaroos have a typical lifespan of 12-18 years in the wild and up to 20-22 years in captivity.

Set of dimensioned standing side elevation drawings of the Wallaroo
Wallaroo
Height:
32”-58” | 81-147 cm
Width:
Length:
30”-55” | 75-140 cm
Depth:
Weight:
40-120 lb | 18-54 kg
Area:
Tail Length
29”-36” | 75-90 cm
Scientific Name
Osphranter robustus
Lifespan
12-18 years (wild); up to 20-22 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Wallaroo side elevation (standing), front (standing), side (jumping)

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Red Kangaroo
Scale illustration of an average Red Kangaroo with dimensions for height and length compared to a human

The Red Kangaroo (Osphranter rufus), maintaining national symbol status and known for their hind-legged bouncing, is an Australian marsupial related to the eastern gray, western gray, and antilopine kangaroos. In addition to Australia, Kangaroos can be found in New Guinea, New Zealand, and on offshore islands. Nearly all kangaroos use their strong hind legs as the main source of mobility while their long tails maintain balance, even acting as a third leg at times.

Other physical characteristics of the Red Kangaroo include human-like and agile forelimbs, small heads, rounded ears, and protruding lips. When a young kangaroo, called a joey, is born, it crawls into the mother’s pouch where it maintains attachment for several weeks until becoming more active. Kangaroos can be irregular in their cycle of activity, travel in groups although seen as independent, and vigorously box as a form of defense against predators.

Red Kangaroos have a standing height of 4’10”-6’10” (147-208 cm), body length between 39”-63” (99-160 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 50-200 lb (23-91 kg). The tail of the Red Kangaroo is 35”-44” (89-112 cm) in length. Red Kangaroos have a typical lifespan of 8-16 years in the wild and up to 25-27 years when raised in captivity.

Measured pair of scaled drawings of Red Kangaroo in various standing poses
he Red Kangaroo (Osphranter rufus), maintaining national symbol status and known for their hind-legged bouncing, is an Australian marsupial related to the eastern gray, western gray, and antilopine kangaroos. Features include human-like agile forelimbs, small heads, round ears, and protruding lips.

Red Kangaroos have a standing height of 4’10”-6’10” (147-208 cm), body length between 39”-63” (99-160 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 50-200 lb (23-91 kg). The tail of the Red Kangaroo is 35”-44” (89-112 cm) in length. Red Kangaroos have a typical lifespan of 8-16 years in the wild and up to 25-27 years when raised in captivity.

Measured pair of scaled drawings of Red Kangaroo in various standing poses
Red Kangaroo
Height:
4’10”-6’10” | 147-208 cm
Width:
Length:
39”-63” | 99-160 cm
Depth:
Weight:
50-200 lb | 23-91 kg
Area:
Tail Length
35”-44” | 89-112 cm
Scientific Name
Osphranter rufus
Lifespan
8-16 years (wild); up to 25-27 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Red Kangaroo side elevation (standing), front (standing), side (jumping), side (lying down)

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Common Wombat
Comparison illustration of the size of a Common Wombat to a typical person

The Wombat (Vombatus ursinus) is a stocky and seemingly tailless burrower often found in the hilly countryside (of Australia). The Common Wombat has coarse hair, and gritty nose pad while the hairy-nosed wombat has silky fur, pointed ears, and a hairy nose pad.

A physical characteristic special to this marsupial is its growing, rootless teeth adapted to be durable given their diet. Herbivorous and mainly nocturnal, the Wombat will burrow itself in cultivated fields and feed on grasses, shrubs, and inner barks of trees. At times, rabbits will take shelter in the burrows of these marsupials.

Common Wombats have a shoulder height of 24”-28” (61-71 cm), body length between 40”-45” (102-114 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 45-75 lb (20-34 kg). The tail of the Common Wombat is 1”-2.5” (2.5-6.4 cm) in length. Common Wombats have a typical lifespan of 5-12 years in the wild and up to 20-30 years when protected in captivity.

Series of dimensioned side elevation illustrations of the Common Wombat
The Wombat (Vombatus ursinus) is a stocky and seemingly tailless burrower often found in the hilly countryside (of Australia). The Common Wombat has coarse hair, and gritty nose pad while the hairy-nosed wombat has silky fur, pointed ears, and a hairy nose pad.

Common Wombats have a shoulder height of 24”-28” (61-71 cm), body length between 40”-45” (102-114 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 45-75 lb (20-34 kg). The tail of the Common Wombat is 1”-2.5” (2.5-6.4 cm) in length. Common Wombats have a typical lifespan of 5-12 years in the wild and up to 20-30 years when protected in captivity.

Series of dimensioned side elevation illustrations of the Common Wombat
Common Wombat
Height:
24”-28” | 61-71 cm
Width:
Length:
40”-45” | 102-114 cm
Depth:
Weight:
45-75 lb | 20-34 kg
Area:
Tail Length
1”-2.5” | 2.5-6.4 cm
Scientific Name
Vombatus ursinus
Lifespan
5-12 years (wild); up to 20-30 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Common Wombat side elevation (standing), front (standing), side (lying down)

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Numbat

The Numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus) is a marsupial that lives in areas of eucalypt forests in Western Australia; the species has been recently reintroduced to South Australia. The Numbat has a finely pointed muzzle and a prominent, bushy tail. They vary considerably in color from soft gray to red-brown, and there is often an area of brick red on the upper back. A black stripe runs from the tip of the muzzle through the eyes, to the bases of the small, round-tipped ears. There are between four and eleven white stripes across the animal’s hindquarters. As insectivores, the Numbat mostly eats termites.

Numbats have a shoulder height of 5”-7” (13-18 cm), body length between 8”-11.5” (20-29 cm), and an overall weight in the range of .6-1.25 lb (.3-.6 kg). The tail of the Numbat is 4.5”-8” (12-21 cm_ in length. Numbats have a typical lifespan of 4-5 years in the wild and up to 8 years in captivity.

Series of side and front elevation illustrations of the Numbat with length and height measurements
The Numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus) is a marsupial that lives in areas of eucalypt forests in Western Australia; the species has been recently reintroduced to South Australia. The Numbat has a finely pointed muzzle and a prominent, bushy tail. They vary in color from soft gray to red-brown.

Numbats have a shoulder height of 5”-7” (13-18 cm), body length between 8”-11.5” (20-29 cm), and an overall weight in the range of .6-1.25 lb (.3-.6 kg). The tail of the Numbat is 4.5”-8” (12-21 cm_ in length. Numbats have a typical lifespan of 4-5 years in the wild and up to 8 years in captivity.

Series of side and front elevation illustrations of the Numbat with length and height measurements
Numbat
Height:
5”-7” | 13-18 cm
Width:
Length:
8”-11.5” | 20-29 cm
Depth:
Weight:
.6-1.25 lb | .3-.6 kg
Area:
Tail Length
4.5”-8” | 12-21 cm
Scientific Name
Myrmecobius fasciatus
Lifespan
4-5 years (wild); up to 8 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Numbat side elevation (standing), front (standing), side (upright), side (sitting)

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Common Spotted Cuscus

The Common Spotted Cusus (Spilocuscus maculatus) is a marsupial that lives in the Cape York region of Australia, New Guinea, and nearby smaller islands. It has a round head, small hidden ears, thick fur, and a curled, prehensile tail that aids in climbing. The tail is a distinctive characteristic of the Common Spotted Cuscus; the upper part of the tail is covered in fur, and the lower half is covered in rough scales. As the dentition is unspecialized, the species eats a wide variety of plant products, and it will also eat flowers, small animals, and occasionally eggs.

Common Spotted Cuscuss have a shoulder height of 8”-13” (20-33 cm), body length between 14”-24” (36-61 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 6.5-15 lb (3-7 kg). The tail of the Common Spotted Cuscus is 13”-22” (33-56 cm) in length. Common Spotted Cuscuss have a typical lifespan of 8-11 years in the wild and up to 17 years when raised in captivity.

Collection of scaled drawings of Common Spotted Cuscus in various poses with height and length
The Common Spotted Cusus (Spilocuscus maculatus) is a marsupial that lives in the Cape York region of Australia, New Guinea, and nearby smaller islands. It has a round head, small hidden ears, thick fur, and a curled, prehensile tail that aids in climbing.

Common Spotted Cuscuss have a shoulder height of 8”-13” (20-33 cm), body length between 14”-24” (36-61 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 6.5-15 lb (3-7 kg). The tail of the Common Spotted Cuscus is 13”-22” (33-56 cm) in length. Common Spotted Cuscuss have a typical lifespan of 8-11 years in the wild and up to 17 years when raised in captivity.

Collection of scaled drawings of Common Spotted Cuscus in various poses with height and length
Common Spotted Cuscus
Height:
8”-13” | 20-33 cm
Width:
Length:
14”-24” | 36-61 cm
Depth:
Weight:
6.5-15 lb | 3-7 kg
Area:
Tail Length
13”-22” | 33-56 cm
Scientific Name
Spilocuscus maculatus
Lifespan
8-11 years (wild); up to 17 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Common Spotted Cuscus side elevation (standing), front (standing), side (sitting)

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