Worms, stemming from the Old English word wyrm, are typically legless, smooth, slender, invertebrates. Worms play important ecological roles as soil conditioners and parasites to crops, animals, and humans. Free-living worms are not found on land, but rather, burrowed underground, in marine, or freshwater environments while parasitic worms are typically found in the intestines of their host. Worms range in size, from microscopic to nearly 190 feet. Worms typically refers to earthworms, bristle worms, roundworms, flatworms, bootlace worms, arrow worms, priapulid worms, and insect larvae. Interestingly, the blindworm is actually a limbless, snakelike lizard, despite its misnomer.

What do worms eat?

Worms are able to eat their body weight every day and tend to eat their food as it starts to decompose. A worm’s diet typically consists of dead plants, some living plants, dead animals, animal feces, bacteria, fungi, and microscopic worms.

How do worms reproduce?

Worms have both male and female sexual organs making them hermaphrodites. Worms are able to reproduce by lining themselves up at their heads and attaching themselves at the clitella. A cocoon is then formed at the clitella band. Each cocoon has 1 to 5 worms, and will hatch when the conditions are right.

Why do worms come out when it rains?

Worms breathe oxygen by absorbing it through its skin. While raining, soil may get too much rain and oxygen in the soil will run out. This causes worms to come out when it rains. Worms are only safe above ground when it is dark, since they run the chance of being eaten by a bird, or being killed by the sun.

Worms Guides
Browse through our curated Worms Guides for additional categorizations, tips, details, variations, styles, and histories of Worms. Guides provide additional insights into the unique properties and shared relationships between elements.
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2.75”-3.74” | 2.5-9.5 cm (Diameter)
1.97”-5.91” | 5-15 cm
.002-.1 lb | 1-45 g
2.5-3.5 years
Bearded Fireworm
9.500
15.000
0.045
3.50
1600
3D
Bearded Fireworm
.79”-1.97” | 2-4 cm (Diameter)
3.28’-9.84’ | 1-3 m
.77-1 lb | .35-.45 kg
3-5 years
Bobbit Worm
4.000
300.000
0.450
5.00
47300
3D
Bobbit Worm
.28”-.39” | 7-10 mm (Diameter)
7.87”-9.84” | 20-25 cm
.01-.09 lb | 5-40 g
4-8 years
Common Earthworm
1.000
25.000
0.040
8.00
6800
3D
Common Earthworm
.2”-.24” | 5-6 mm (Diameter)
1.97”-5.12” | 5-13 cm
.002-.003 lb | 1-1.5 g
1-3 years
European Nightcrawler
0.600
13.000
0.002
3.00
700
3D
European Nightcrawler
.08”-.12” | 2-3 mm (Diameter)
5.91”-27.56” | 15-70 cm
1-12 months
Flea Tapeworm
0.300
70.000
1.00
28400
3D
Flea Tapeworm
.79”-1.18” | 2-3 cm (Diameter)
3.28’-9.84’ | 1-3 m
.44-.88 lb | .2-.4 kg
10-20 years
Giant Gippsland Earthworm
3.000
300.000
0.400
20.00
4100
3D
Giant Gippsland Earthworm
1.57”-1.97” | 4-5 cm (Diameter)
6.56’-9.84’ | 2-3 m
.006-.09 lb | 3-44 g
100-300 years
Giant Tube Worm
5.000
300.000
0.044
300.00
4700
3D
Giant Tube Worm
.12”-.2” | 3-5 mm (Diameter)
7.87”-15.75” | 20-40 cm
Hammerhead Flatworm
0.500
40.000
13100
3D
Hammerhead Flatworm
Lugworm
12900
3.54”-3.94” | 9-10 cm (Diameter)
3.94”-11.81” | 10-30 cm
.002-.003 lb | 1-1.5 g
5-6 years
Lugworm
10.000
30.000
0.002
6.00
12900
3D
Lugworm
.08”-.2” | 2-5 mm (Diameter)
1.57”-2.75” | 4-7 cm
.001-.002 lb | .5-1 g
New Guinea Flatworm
0.500
7.000
0.001
6000
3D
New Guinea Flatworm
Pinworm
124000
.01”-.02” | .3-.6 mm (Diameter)
.2”-.51” | .5-1.3 cm
1-2 months
Pinworm
0.060
1.300
0.17
124000
3D
Pinworm
.24”-.28” | 6-7 mm (Diameter)
6.56’-23’ | 2-7 m
3-5 years
Pork Tapeworm
0.700
700.000
5.00
76800
3D
Pork Tapeworm
.12”-.2” | 3-5 mm (Diameter)
1.18”-5.12” | 3-13 cm
.009-.013 lb | 4-6 g
2-5 years
Redworm
0.500
13.000
0.006
5.00
5900
3D
Redworm
.12”-.14” | 3-3.5 mm (Diameter)
1.18”-1.97” | 3-5 cm
1-3 years
Whipworm
0.350
5.000
3.00
56000
3D
Whipworm
Lugworm (Arenicola marina)
Dimensioned comparison drawing of the Lugworm compared to other worms

The Lugworm (Arenicola marina) is a large marine worm. While the animal is rarely seen, its coiled castings are a familiar sight on a beach at low tide. They live in U-shaped burrows in the sand, and they feed on organic material like micro-organisms and detritus in the sediment. The sediment is ingested in the burrow, which leaves a depression on the surface of the sand. The Lugworm resembles a typical annelid with a ringed or segmented body, a blackish-red hue on its head end, a middle segment with bristles along the sides, and pairs of feathery gills.

The Lugworm has an overall length between 3.94”-11.81” (10-30 cm), diameter of 3.54”-3.94” (9-10 cm), and weight of .002-.003 lb (1-1.5 g). The typical lifespan of the Lugworm is between 5-6 years.

Set of scaled top view drawings of the Lugworm
The Lugworm (Arenicola marina) is a large marine worm. While the animal is rarely seen, its coiled castings are a familiar sight on a beach at low tide. They live in U-shaped burrows in the sand, and they feed on organic material like micro-organisms and detritus in the sediment.

The Lugworm has an overall length between 3.94”-11.81” (10-30 cm), diameter of 3.54”-3.94” (9-10 cm), and weight of .002-.003 lb (1-1.5 g). The typical lifespan of the Lugworm is between 5-6 years.

Set of scaled top view drawings of the Lugworm
Lugworm (Arenicola marina)
Height:
Width:
3.54”-3.94” | 9-10 cm (Diameter)
Length:
3.94”-11.81” | 10-30 cm
Depth:
Weight:
.002-.003 lb | 1-1.5 g
Area:
Scientific Name
Arenicola marina
Lifespan
5-6 years

Drawings include:

Lugworm top view (assorted)

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Giant Gippsland Earthworm (Megascolides australis)
Dimensioned comparison drawing of the Giant Gippsland Earthworm compared to other worms

The Giant Gippsland Earthworm (Megascolides australis) is an earthworm species native to Australia. They occupy deep burrow systems that require water to respire; these are located in the subsoil of blue, gray, or red clay soils along stream banks in Gippsland in Victoria, Australia. The Giant Gippsland Earthworm is usually very sluggish, but when they move quickly through their burrows, they make an audible gurgling or sucking sound. Unlike other earthworms that deposit castings on the surface the Giant Gippsland Earthworm spends all their time in burrows and deposit their castings there.

The Giant Gippsland Earthworm has an overall length between 3.28’-9.84’ (1-3 m), diameter of .79”-1.18” (2-3 cm), and weight of .44-.88 lb (.2-.4 kg). The typical lifespan of the Giant Gippsland Earthworm is between 10-20 years.

Set of scaled top view drawings of the Giant Gippsland Earthworm
The Giant Gippsland Earthworm (Megascolides australis) is an earthworm species native to Australia. They occupy deep burrow systems that require water to respire; these are located in the subsoil of blue, gray, or red clay soils along stream banks in Gippsland in Victoria, Australia.

The Giant Gippsland Earthworm has an overall length between 3.28’-9.84’ (1-3 m), diameter of .79”-1.18” (2-3 cm), and weight of .44-.88 lb (.2-.4 kg). The typical lifespan of the Giant Gippsland Earthworm is between 10-20 years.

Set of scaled top view drawings of the Giant Gippsland Earthworm
Giant Gippsland Earthworm (Megascolides australis)
Height:
Width:
.79”-1.18” | 2-3 cm (Diameter)
Length:
3.28’-9.84’ | 1-3 m
Depth:
Weight:
.44-.88 lb | .2-.4 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Megascolides australis
Lifespan
10-20 years

Drawings include:

Giant Gippsland Earthworm top view (assorted)

Details & Downloads

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2D Downloads

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Flea Tapeworm (Dipylidium caninum)
Comparison illustration of the size of a Flea Tapeworm to other worms

The Flea Tapeworm (Dipylidum caninum) is a cyclophyllid cestode that infects organisms afflicted with fleas and canine chewing lice. In appearance it resembles cucumber seeds, grains of rice, or sesame seeds. This parasite affects animals like dogs and cats globally, but most infections are asymptomatic, and the infections that do show symptoms are mild. Humans can be affected but to a significantly lesser degree, and it is more likely to occur in children. The best way to prevent human infection is to treat infected animals with products that kill the fleas on the animal.

The Flea Tapeworm has an overall length between 5.91”-27.56” (15-70 cm) and diameter of .08”-.12” (2-3 mm). The typical lifespan of the Flea Tapeworm is between 1-12 months.

Scaled collection of drawings of Flea Tapeworm in various poses
The Flea Tapeworm (Dipylidum caninum) is a cyclophyllid cestode that infects organisms afflicted with fleas and canine chewing lice. In appearance it resembles cucumber seeds, grains of rice, or sesame seeds. This parasite affects animals like dogs and cats globally.

The Flea Tapeworm has an overall length between 5.91”-27.56” (15-70 cm) and diameter of .08”-.12” (2-3 mm). The typical lifespan of the Flea Tapeworm is between 1-12 months.

Scaled collection of drawings of Flea Tapeworm in various poses
Flea Tapeworm (Dipylidium caninum)
Height:
Width:
.08”-.12” | 2-3 mm (Diameter)
Length:
5.91”-27.56” | 15-70 cm
Depth:
Weight:
Area:
Scientific Name
Dipylidium caninum
Lifespan
1-12 months

Drawings include:

Flea Tapeworm top view (assorted)

Details & Downloads

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3D Downloads

Bearded Fireworm (Hermodice carunculata)
Scale illustration of an average Bearded Fireworm compared to other worm species

The Bearded Fireworm (Hermodice carunculata) is a marine bristleworm that lives in the coastal waters of the Atlantic Ocean. It occupies many marine living environments like corals, rocks, mud, sand, posidonia, and drifting wood. Superficially, the Bearded Fireworm looks like a centipede with its flat body, multiple segments, white silks, and gills located on the side of its body. There are 60-150 identical segments on the body, each separated by a thin white line. Color variations include yellow, red, gray, and white with a pearly glow. As a voracious predator, the Bearded Fireworm feeds on soft and hard corals, anemones, and small crustaceans.

The Bearded Fireworm has an overall length between 1.97”-5.91” (5-15 cm), diameter of 2.75”-3.74” (2.5-9.5 cm), and weight of .002-.1 lb (1-45 g). The typical lifespan of the Bearded Fireworm is between 2.5-3.5 years.

Series of top view illustrations of the Bearded Fireworm
The Bearded Fireworm (Hermodice carunculata) is a marine bristleworm that lives in the coastal waters of the Atlantic Ocean. It occupies many marine living environments like corals, rocks, mud, sand, posidonia, and drifting wood. Superficially, the Bearded Fireworm looks like a centipede.

The Bearded Fireworm has an overall length between 1.97”-5.91” (5-15 cm), diameter of 2.75”-3.74” (2.5-9.5 cm), and weight of .002-.1 lb (1-45 g). The typical lifespan of the Bearded Fireworm is between 2.5-3.5 years.

Series of top view illustrations of the Bearded Fireworm
Bearded Fireworm (Hermodice carunculata)
Height:
Width:
2.75”-3.74” | 2.5-9.5 cm (Diameter)
Length:
1.97”-5.91” | 5-15 cm
Depth:
Weight:
.002-.1 lb | 1-45 g
Area:
Scientific Name
Hermodice carunculata
Lifespan
2.5-3.5 years

Drawings include:

Bearded Fireworm top view (assorted)

Details & Downloads

Downloads

2D Downloads

3D Downloads

Bobbit Worm (Eunice aphroditois)
Comparison illustration of the size of a Bobbit Worm to other worms

The Bobbit Worm (Eunice aphroditois) is a bristleworm that lives in self-made burrows in the ocean floor. They mainly live in the Atlantic Ocean, but they are also found in the Indo-Pacific ocean area. Due to their slim bodies and ability to hunt and blend in tight spaces, they are often found among coral reefs. As an omnivore, the species eats small fish, worms, seaweed, and other macroalgae. Physically, the Bobbit Worm has a hard exoskeleton, two eyes and five antennae on the head, and retractable mandibles. Color variations can be deep purple, black, and a metallic hue, and the fourth antenna is always white.

The Bobbit Worm has an overall length between 3.28’-9.84’ (1-3 m), diameter of .79”-1.97” (2-4 cm), and weight of .77-1 lb (.35-.45 kg). The typical lifespan of the Bobbit Worm is between 3-5 years.

Scaled collection of drawings of Bobbit Worm in various poses
The Bobbit Worm (Eunice aphroditois) is a bristleworm that lives in self-made burrows in the ocean floor. They mainly live in the Atlantic Ocean, but they are also found in the Indo-Pacific ocean area. Due to their slim bodies and ability to hunt and blend in tight spaces.

The Bobbit Worm has an overall length between 3.28’-9.84’ (1-3 m), diameter of .79”-1.97” (2-4 cm), and weight of .77-1 lb (.35-.45 kg). The typical lifespan of the Bobbit Worm is between 3-5 years.

Scaled collection of drawings of Bobbit Worm in various poses
Bobbit Worm (Eunice aphroditois)
Height:
Width:
.79”-1.97” | 2-4 cm (Diameter)
Length:
3.28’-9.84’ | 1-3 m
Depth:
Weight:
.77-1 lb | .35-.45 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Eunice aphroditois
Lifespan
3-5 years

Drawings include:

Bobbit Worm top view (assorted)

Details & Downloads

Downloads

2D Downloads

3D Downloads

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