Bats, one of the most numerous types of mammals comprising 20% of all mammal species, are the only species of mammals capable of true flight. There are 1,200 different species of bats ranging in wingspan sizes from a little over an inch to five feet with two different suborders of bats: the megabats and the microbats.. Bats are found on nearly every continent, except for extreme deserts and arctic environments. Bats are nocturnal and typically feed on insects or fruits, but 3 species of bats feed on blood (typically from cattle) and thus have spawned many myths and folklore associations with vampires, darkness, and horror.

Where do bats live?

Bats live all over the world and in a lot of regions of the United States. During the day they tend to seek caves, rock crevices, old buildings, bridges, mines, and trees. Throughout the winter bats hibernate or migrate to warmer climates.

How long do bats live?

Bats have an average lifespan of 20 years while the oldest bat on record lived up to 40 years. A bat older than 30 years is the equivalent to a human older than 100 years. Bats are the longest-lived mammals considering their small size.

Where do bats go in the winter?

Some bats seek a hibernation site in the winter, while others migrate to warmer weather. Bats that do hibernate tend to do so in secluded spaces such as caves, isolated areas, mines, rock crevices, and structures with the adequate temperature and humidity. Some bats seek warmer weather as food becomes scarce in the winter.

Bats Guides
Browse through our curated Bats Guides for additional categorizations, tips, details, variations, styles, and histories of Bats. Guides provide additional insights into the unique properties and shared relationships between elements.
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
2.4”-2.75” | 6-7 cm (Hanging)
5.9”-6.7” | 15-17 cm (Wingspan)
1.1”-1.6” | 2.9-4.2 cm (Body)
.05-.07 oz | 1.5-2 g
5-10 years
Bumblebee Bat
7.000
17.000
4.200
0.002
10.00
24600
3D
Bumblebee Bat
3.9”-4.5” | 10-11.5 cm (Hanging)
7.9”-9.1” | 20-23 cm (Wingspan)
2.4”-3.1” | 6-8 cm (Body)
.67-1.4 oz | 19-41 g
4-5 years
Common Sheath-Tailed Bat
11.500
23.000
8.000
0.041
5.00
35
3D
Common Sheath-Tailed Bat
5.3”-6.3” | 13.5-16 cm (Hanging)
13.8”-15.75” | 35-40 cm (Wingspan)
2.6”-3.5” | 6.5-9 cm (Body)
.88-1.6 oz | 25-45 g
12-29 years
Common Vampire Bat
16.000
40.000
9.000
0.045
29.00
7100
3D
Common Vampire Bat
18.5”-21.7” | 47-55 cm (Hanging)
59”-67” | 150-170 cm (Wingspan)
11.4”-15.75” | 29-40 cm (Body)
2.2-2.6 lb | 1-1.2 kg
15-23 years
Giant Golden-Crowned Flying Fox
55.000
170.000
40.000
1.200
23.00
16900
3D
Giant Golden-Crowned Flying Fox
15”-18.1” | 38-46 cm (Hanging)
39”-47” | 100-120 cm (Wingspan)
9.1”-13” | 23-33 cm (Body)
2.2-3.5 lb | 1-1.6 kg
9-23 years
Great Flying Fox
46.000
120.000
33.000
1.600
23.00
130
3D
Great Flying Fox
4.5”-5.3” | 11.5-13.5 cm (Hanging)
13.4”-15.75” | 34-40 cm (Wingspan)
2”-2.75” | 5-7 cm (Body)
.46-1.2 oz | 13-34 g
10-30 years
Greater Horseshoe Bat
13.500
40.000
7.000
0.034
30.00
2100
3D
Greater Horseshoe Bat
9.8”-14.2” | 25-36 cm (Hanging)
27.2”-38.2” | 69-97 cm (Wingspan)
7.5”-11” | 19-28 cm (Body)
.5-1 lb | 230-450 g
12-30 years
Hammer-Headed Bat
36.000
97.000
28.000
0.450
30.00
11000
3D
Hammer-Headed Bat
5.9”-6.7” | 15-17 cm (Hanging)
15”-16.9” | 38-43 cm (Wingspan)
5.1”-5.9” | 13-15 cm (Body)
.71-1.2 oz | 20-35 g
6-14 years
Hoary Bat
17.000
43.000
15.000
0.035
14.00
6506
3D
Hoary Bat
1.8”-2” | 4.5-5 cm (Hanging)
3.7”-4.1” | 9.5-10.5 cm (Wingspan)
1.5”-1.9” | 3.7-4.7 cm (Body)
.18-.21 oz | 5-6 g
7-18 years
Honduran White Bat
5.000
10.500
4.700
0.006
18.00
16450
3D
Honduran White Bat
3.9”-5.1” | 10-13 cm (Hanging)
8.7”-10.6” | 22-27 cm (Wingspan)
3.1”-3.7” | 8-9.5 cm (Body)
.18-.46 oz | 5-13 g
7-34 years
Little Brown Bat
13.000
27.000
9.500
0.013
34.00
11000
3D
Little Brown Bat
3.9”-4.7” | 10-12 cm (Hanging)
11.4”-13.8” | 29-35 cm (Wingspan)
3.1”-3.9” | 8-10 cm (Body)
.25-.42 oz | 7-12 g
8-12 years
Mexican Free-Tailed Bat
12.000
35.000
10.000
0.012
12.00
7000
3D
Mexican Free-Tailed Bat
3.9”-4.7” | 10-12 cm (Hanging)
9.8”-11.8” | 25-30 cm (Wingspan)
2.75”-3.4” | 7-8.6 cm (Body)
.25-.35 oz | 7-10 g
Unknown
Palaeochiropteryx
12.000
30.000
8.600
0.010
140
3D
Palaeochiropteryx
Greater Horseshoe Bat (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum)
Scale illustration of an average Greater Horseshoe Bat compared to other bat species

The Greater Horseshoe Bat (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum) is a bat that is distributed throughout Europe, Northern Africa, Central Asia, and Eastern Asia. They commonly forage in pastures, deciduous temperate woodlands, and Mediterranean and sub-Mediterranean shrublands and woodlands. In the winter they hibernate in underground sites. The Greater Horseshoe Bat has a distinctive noseleaf which has a pointed upper part and a horseshoe shaped lower part; the horseshoe noseleaf aids to focus the ultrasound the bat uses to see. The fur is soft, fluffy, and the colors range from gray, gray-brown and gray-white. As insectivores, the Great Horseshoe Bat primarily eats moths and beetles.

The Greater Horseshoe Bat has a wingspan in the range of 13.4”-15.75” (34-40 cm) and total weight of .46-1.2 oz (13-34 g). The body of the Greater Horseshoe Bat has a body length between 2”-2.75” (5-7 cm) and estimated hanging height of 4.5”-5.3” (11.5-13.5 cm). The typical lifespan of the Greater Horseshoe Bat is between 10-30 years.

Series of measured illustrations of the Greater Horseshoe Bat in multiple flying and hanging poses
The Greater Horseshoe Bat (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum) is a bat that is distributed throughout Europe, Northern Africa, Central Asia, and Eastern Asia. They commonly forage in pastures, deciduous temperate woodlands, and Mediterranean and sub-Mediterranean shrublands and woodlands.

The Greater Horseshoe Bat has a wingspan in the range of 13.4”-15.75” (34-40 cm) and total weight of .46-1.2 oz (13-34 g). The body of the Greater Horseshoe Bat has a body length between 2”-2.75” (5-7 cm) and estimated hanging height of 4.5”-5.3” (11.5-13.5 cm). The typical lifespan of the Greater Horseshoe Bat is between 10-30 years.

Series of measured illustrations of the Greater Horseshoe Bat in multiple flying and hanging poses
Greater Horseshoe Bat (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum)
Height:
4.5”-5.3” | 11.5-13.5 cm (Hanging)
Width:
13.4”-15.75” | 34-40 cm (Wingspan)
Length:
2”-2.75” | 5-7 cm (Body)
Depth:
Weight:
.46-1.2 oz | 13-34 g
Area:
Scientific Name
Rhinolophus ferrumequinum
Lifespan
10-30 years

Drawings include:

Greater Horseshoe Bat flying (assorted), hanging

Details & Downloads

Downloads

2D Downloads

3D Downloads

Mexican Free-Tailed Bat (Tadarida brasiliensis)
Comparison illustration of the size of a Mexican Free-Tailed Bat to other species of bats

The Mexican Free-Tailed Bat (Tadarida brasiliensis), also known as the Brazilian Free-Tailed Nat, is a medium-sized bat species, known for having the fastest horizontal speed of any animal. The Mexican Free-Tailed Bat has a tail that is half of its body length and a body that is covered with red-brown fur. The Mexican Free-Tailed Bat is native to both North American and South American and typically lives in caves. The Mexican Free-Tailed Bat hunts and eats moths, beetles, dragonflies, flies, true bugs, wasps, and ants. It has a lifespan of up to 17 years and is not in danger of extinction.

The Mexican Free-Tailed Bat has a wingspan in the range of 11.4”-13.8” (29-35 cm) and total weight of .25-.42 oz (7-12 g). The body of the Mexican Free-Tailed Bat has a body length between 3.1”-3.9” (8-10 cm) and estimated hanging height of 3.9”-4.7” (10-12 cm). The typical lifespan of the Mexican Free-Tailed Bat is between 8-12 years.

Scaled collection of drawings of Mexican Free-Tailed Bat in various flying poses with dimensions
The Mexican Free-Tailed Bat (Tadarida brasiliensis), also known as the Brazilian Free-Tailed Nat, is a medium-sized bat species, known for having the fastest horizontal speed of any animal. The Mexican Free-Tailed Bat has a tail that is half of its body length and a body covered with red-brown fur.

The Mexican Free-Tailed Bat has a wingspan in the range of 11.4”-13.8” (29-35 cm) and total weight of .25-.42 oz (7-12 g). The body of the Mexican Free-Tailed Bat has a body length between 3.1”-3.9” (8-10 cm) and estimated hanging height of 3.9”-4.7” (10-12 cm). The typical lifespan of the Mexican Free-Tailed Bat is between 8-12 years.

Scaled collection of drawings of Mexican Free-Tailed Bat in various flying poses with dimensions
Mexican Free-Tailed Bat (Tadarida brasiliensis)
Height:
3.9”-4.7” | 10-12 cm (Hanging)
Width:
11.4”-13.8” | 29-35 cm (Wingspan)
Length:
3.1”-3.9” | 8-10 cm (Body)
Depth:
Weight:
.25-.42 oz | 7-12 g
Area:
Scientific Name
Tadarida brasiliensis
Lifespan
8-12 years

Drawings include:

Mexican Free-Tailed Bat flying (assorted), hanging

Details & Downloads

Downloads

2D Downloads

3D Downloads

Great Flying Fox (Pteropus neohibernicus)
Comparison illustration of the size of a Great Flying Fox to other species of bats

The Flying Fox, also known as the fox bat or fruit bat, is the largest of the bat species. Located on tropical islands extending from Madagascar to Australia, the flying fox has a wide wingspan, silky dense fur and facial features resembling that of a small fox: small ears and big eyes. The flying fox relies on sight rather than echolocation for navigation and smell for the locating of food (fruit) and mates.

The Great Flying Fox has a wingspan in the range of 39”-47” (100-120 cm) and total weight of 2.2-3.5 lb (1-1.6 kg). The body of the Great Flying Fox has a body length between 9.1”-13” (23-33 cm) and estimated hanging height of 15”-18.1” (38-46 cm). The typical lifespan of the Great Flying Fox is between 9-23 years.

Scaled collection of drawings of Great Flying Fox in various flying poses with dimensions
The Flying Fox, also known as the fox bat or fruit bat, is the largest of the bat species. Located on tropical islands extending from Madagascar to Australia, the flying fox has a wide wingspan, silky dense fur and facial features resembling that of a small fox: small ears and big eyes.

The Great Flying Fox has a wingspan in the range of 39”-47” (100-120 cm) and total weight of 2.2-3.5 lb (1-1.6 kg). The body of the Great Flying Fox has a body length between 9.1”-13” (23-33 cm) and estimated hanging height of 15”-18.1” (38-46 cm). The typical lifespan of the Great Flying Fox is between 9-23 years.

Scaled collection of drawings of Great Flying Fox in various flying poses with dimensions
Great Flying Fox (Pteropus neohibernicus)
Height:
15”-18.1” | 38-46 cm (Hanging)
Width:
39”-47” | 100-120 cm (Wingspan)
Length:
9.1”-13” | 23-33 cm (Body)
Depth:
Weight:
2.2-3.5 lb | 1-1.6 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Pteropus neohibernicus
Lifespan
9-23 years

Drawings include:

Great Flying Fox flying (assorted), hanging

Details & Downloads

Downloads

2D Downloads

3D Downloads

Common Vampire Bat (Desmodus rotundus)
Scale illustration of an average Common Vampire Bat compared to other bat species

The Common Vampire Bat (Desmodus rotundus) is a small bat that roosts in trees, caves, abandoned buildings, old wells, and mines, in parts of Mexico, Central America, and South America. They prefer warm and humid climates, and use tropical and subtropical woodlands and open grasslands to forage. The name, Common Vampire Bat, is in reference to the bat’s diet, which is primarily mammalian blood, and particularly that of livestock like cattle and horses. The bat approaches the sleeping prey at night, and uses its sharp teeth to cut open the skin of its hosts to lap up their blood. Unlike other bats, the Common Vampire Bat, can run on land.

The Common Vampire Bat has a wingspan in the range of 13.8”-15.75” (35-40 cm) and total weight of .88-1.6 oz (25-45 g). The body of the Common Vampire Bat has a body length between 2.6”-3.5” (6.5-9 cm) and estimated hanging height of 5.3”-6.3” (13.5-16 cm). The typical lifespan of the Common Vampire Bat is between 12-29 years.

Series of measured illustrations of the Common Vampire Bat in multiple flying and hanging poses
The Common Vampire Bat (Desmodus rotundus) is a small bat that roosts in trees, caves, abandoned buildings, old wells, and mines, in parts of Mexico, Central America, and South America. They prefer warm and humid climates, and use tropical and subtropical woodlands and open grasslands to forage.

The Common Vampire Bat has a wingspan in the range of 13.8”-15.75” (35-40 cm) and total weight of .88-1.6 oz (25-45 g). The body of the Common Vampire Bat has a body length between 2.6”-3.5” (6.5-9 cm) and estimated hanging height of 5.3”-6.3” (13.5-16 cm). The typical lifespan of the Common Vampire Bat is between 12-29 years.

Series of measured illustrations of the Common Vampire Bat in multiple flying and hanging poses
Common Vampire Bat (Desmodus rotundus)
Height:
5.3”-6.3” | 13.5-16 cm (Hanging)
Width:
13.8”-15.75” | 35-40 cm (Wingspan)
Length:
2.6”-3.5” | 6.5-9 cm (Body)
Depth:
Weight:
.88-1.6 oz | 25-45 g
Area:
Scientific Name
Desmodus rotundus
Lifespan
12-29 years

Drawings include:

Common Vampire Bat flying (assorted), hanging

Details & Downloads

Downloads

2D Downloads

3D Downloads

Palaeochiropteryx (Palaeochiropteryx tupaiodon)
Scale illustration of an average Palaeochiropteryx compared to other bat species

The Palaeochiropteryx is an extinct bat from the Middle Eocene of Europe. Despite being one of the oldest bats known, the Palaeochiropteryx was advanced in its ability to hunt by echolocation like modern insect-eating bats, and like its predecessors, the species also fed on insects. Unlike modern bats, the Palaeochiropteryx’s wings were less advanced, and they were formed from enlarged hands. They had 38 teeth, and their dental formula was known to be the same as at least three living bat families. Phaeomelanin were present in the hairs of the species, suggesting they were brown in color.

The Palaeochiropteryx has a wingspan in the range of 9.8”-11.8” (25-30 cm) and total weight of .25-.35 oz (7-10 g). The body of the Palaeochiropteryx has a body length between 2.75”-3.4” (7-8.6 cm) and estimated hanging height of 3.9”-4.7” (10-12 cm). The typical lifespan of the Palaeochiropteryx is unknown.

Series of measured illustrations of the Palaeochiropteryx in multiple flying and hanging poses
The Palaeochiropteryx is an extinct bat from the Middle Eocene of Europe. Despite being one of the oldest bats known, the Palaeochiropteryx was advanced in its ability to hunt by echolocation like modern insect-eating bats, and like its predecessors, the species also fed on insects.

The Palaeochiropteryx has a wingspan in the range of 9.8”-11.8” (25-30 cm) and total weight of .25-.35 oz (7-10 g). The body of the Palaeochiropteryx has a body length between 2.75”-3.4” (7-8.6 cm) and estimated hanging height of 3.9”-4.7” (10-12 cm). The typical lifespan of the Palaeochiropteryx is unknown.

Series of measured illustrations of the Palaeochiropteryx in multiple flying and hanging poses
Palaeochiropteryx (Palaeochiropteryx tupaiodon)
Height:
3.9”-4.7” | 10-12 cm (Hanging)
Width:
9.8”-11.8” | 25-30 cm (Wingspan)
Length:
2.75”-3.4” | 7-8.6 cm (Body)
Depth:
Weight:
.25-.35 oz | 7-10 g
Area:
Scientific Name
Palaeochiropteryx tupaiodon
Lifespan
Unknown

Drawings include:

Palaeochiropteryx flying (assorted), hanging

Details & Downloads

Downloads

2D Downloads

3D Downloads

Related Animals Collections
Animals