Songbirds | Passeri

Songbirds | Passeri

Description
Description

Songbirds, also known as Passeri, belong to the largest suborder of perching birds, characterized by their diverse and complex vocalizations. These melodious creatures are found globally, inhabiting forests, grasslands, deserts, and urban areas. Their evolutionary journey, dating back to the Miocene epoch, has led to remarkable adaptations in vocal organs, facilitating intricate songs for communication and mating. Diverse in size, color, and habitat, songbirds play crucial roles in ecosystems as pollinators, seed dispersers, and indicators of environmental health. Their widespread presence and the joy their songs bring have made them an integral part of human culture and natural heritage.

Anatomy
Anatomy

Songbirds are known for their well-developed vocal organs, allowing them to produce a range of complex sounds. Their syrinx, the vocal organ located at the base of their windpipe, is highly specialized, enabling intricate songs and calls. They typically have slender bodies, adaptable for agile flight and perching. Their strong legs and toes aid in gripping branches, while their beaks vary in shape, adapted to their specific diets. Keen vision allows them to navigate and forage efficiently. Additionally, songbirds possess acute hearing, crucial for social communication and responding to potential threats in their environment.

Human Interaction
Human Interaction

From ancient folklore to modern music, songbirds have captivated humans with their melodies and presence. These avian symphonists symbolize freedom and beauty across cultures, inspiring countless works of art, literature, and music. The dawn chorus of songbirds is a cherished natural symphony, highlighting their deep-rooted place in human experience.

Unfortunately, many species face threats from habitat loss and climate change. Recognizing their ecological and cultural significance, conservation efforts are underway globally, involving habitat protection, legal protections, and public awareness campaigns. These initiatives aim to ensure that future generations can continue to enjoy the enchanting songs of these feathered friends.

Common Questions
Common Questions
What do songbirds eat?

Songbirds typically eat a variety of foods including insects, seeds, berries, nectar, and fruit. Much of a songbird’s diet consists of insects and this helps farmers keep insects from damaging crops. Some birds can eat as many as 300 insects a day during the summer season.

How do you attract songbirds?

The best way to attract songbirds is to plant native shrubs, vines, and trees. Other methods are to provide a water source, create a songbird border by placing trees and shrubs that meet the needs of songbirds, and rake leaves under shrubs. It is also recommended to reduce lawn space by at least 25%.

Why do songbirds sing?

Songbirds sing to defend themselves as well as impress others. Although singing can take a lot of their energy they do so to claim and defend their territory against potential predators. Singing is also part of their mating process and may attract any potential mates as well as inform them of their overall health.

Animals

* Under Development *

5.5”-6.9” | 14-17.5 cm
12.2”-15.75” | 31-40 cm (Wingspan)
9.1”-11” | 23-28 cm
2.3-3 oz | 65-84 g
2-14 years
American Robin
17.500
40.000
28.000
0.084
14.00
49100
GUIDE
3D
American Robin
3.1”-3.9” | 8-10 cm
10.2”-11.4” | 26-29 cm (Wingspan)
5.5”-6.7” | 14-17 cm
.9-1.1 oz | 26-32 g
5-10 years
Blue Grosbeak
10.000
29.000
17.000
0.032
10.00
7700
GUIDE
3D
Blue Grosbeak
Blue Jay
304100
5.7”-7.7” | 14.5-19.5 cm
13.4”-16.9” | 34-43 cm (Wingspan)
8.7”-11.8” | 22-30 cm
2.3-3.5 oz | 65-100 g
7-26 years
Blue Jay
19.500
43.000
30.000
0.100
26.00
304100
GUIDE
3D
Blue Jay
1.6”-2” | 4-5 cm
6.7”-7.9” | 17-20 cm (Wingspan)
4.7”-5.5” | 12-14 cm
.2-.35 oz | 5.7-9.9 g
2-5 years
Brown Creeper
5.000
20.000
14.000
0.010
5.00
7250
GUIDE
3D
Brown Creeper
5.5”-7.3” | 14-18.5 cm
11.4”-13” | 29-33 cm (Wingspan)
9.1”-11.8” | 23-30 cm
2.2-3.1 oz | 61-88 g
2-13 years
Brown Thrasher
18.500
33.000
30.000
0.088
13.00
25080
GUIDE
3D
Brown Thrasher
3.7”-4.7” | 9.5-12 cm
10.6”-11” | 27-28 cm (Wingspan)
7.1”-9.1” | 18-23 cm
1.2-1.7 oz | 33-47 g
2-7 years
Cactus Wren
12.000
28.000
23.000
0.047
7.00
8620
GUIDE
3D
Cactus Wren
3”-3.5” | 7.5-9 cm
9.4”-11.4” | 24-29 cm (Wingspan)
4.7”-5.5” | 12-14 cm
.6-.8 oz | 18-23 g
6-9 years
Carolina Wren
9.000
29.000
14.000
0.023
9.00
39050
GUIDE
3D
Carolina Wren
3.3”-4.7” | 8.5-12 cm
8.7”-11.8” | 22-30 cm (Wingspan)
5.5”-7.9” | 14-20 cm
1-1.1 oz | 28-32 g
3-8 years
Cedar Waxwing
12.000
30.000
20.000
0.032
8.00
39350
GUIDE
3D
Cedar Waxwing
5.5”-6.9” | 14-17.5 cm
13.4”-15.4” | 34-39 cm (Wingspan)
9.1”-11.4” | 23-29 cm
2.8-4.4 oz | 80-125 g
2-22 years
Common Blackbird
17.500
39.000
29.000
0.125
22.00
34300
GUIDE
3D
Common Blackbird
12.2”-15.75” | 31-40 cm
45.3”-59” | 115-150 cm (Wingspan)
20.9”-26.4” | 53-67 cm
24.7-70.5 oz | .7-2 kg
10-44 years
Common Raven
40.000
150.000
67.000
2.000
44.00
49000
GUIDE
3D
Common Raven
5.3”-5.7” | 13.5-14.5 cm
13.4”-13.8” | 34-35 cm (Wingspan)
10.6”-11” | 27-28 cm
2.2-3.3 oz | 61-94 g
5-11 years
Curve-Billed Thrasher
14.500
35.000
28.000
0.094
11.00
1650
GUIDE
3D
Curve-Billed Thrasher
5.3”-7.9” | 13.5-20 cm
13.8”-15.75” | 35-40 cm (Wingspan)
7.5”-11” | 19-28 cm
2.7-5.3 oz | 76-150 g
3-9 years
Eastern Meadowlark
20.000
40.000
28.000
0.150
9.00
4890
GUIDE
3D
Eastern Meadowlark
3.7”-4.7” | 9.5-12 cm
11.8”-13.4” | 30-34 cm (Wingspan)
6.3”-7.9” | 16-20 cm
1-1.7 oz | 28-48 g
2-8 years
Horned Lark
12.000
34.000
20.000
0.048
8.00
5050
GUIDE
3D
Horned Lark
3.9”-4.5” | 10-11.5 cm
11”-12.6” | 28-32 cm (Wingspan)
7.9”-9.1” | 20-23 cm
1.2-1.8 oz | 34-51 g
7-13 years
Loggerhead Shrike
11.500
32.000
23.000
0.051
13.00
7650
GUIDE
3D
Loggerhead Shrike
4.3”-5.1” | 11-13 cm
9.8”-12.2” | 25-31 cm (Wingspan)
8.3”-9.4” | 21-24 cm
1.5-1.7 oz | 42-48 g
2-16 years
Northern Cardinal
13.000
31.000
24.000
0.048
16.00
43000
GUIDE
3D
Northern Cardinal
4.7”-5.9” | 12-15 cm
12.2”-13.8” | 31-35 cm (Wingspan)
8.3”-10.2” | 21-26 cm
1.4-2 oz | 40-58 g
7-15 years
Northern Mockingbird
15.000
35.000
26.000
0.058
15.00
30200
GUIDE
3D
Northern Mockingbird
Rook
46400
10.6”-12.6” | 27-32 cm
31.9”-39” | 81-99 cm (Wingspan)
16.1”-19.3” | 41-49 cm
9.9-18.7 oz | 280-530 g
6-24 years
Rook
32.000
99.000
49.000
0.530
24.00
46400
GUIDE
3D
Rook
3”-3.5” | 7.5-9 cm
7.9”-10.2” | 20-26 cm (Wingspan)
5.5”-6.3” | 14-16 cm
.6-.9 oz | 17-26 g
2-13 years
Tufted Titmouse
9.000
26.000
16.000
0.026
13.00
37100
GUIDE
3D
Tufted Titmouse
4.1”-4.9” | 10.5-12.5 cm
11.8”-13” | 30-33 cm (Wingspan)
6.3”-7.5” | 16-19 cm
.8-1.1 oz | 24-31 g
6-9 years
Western Bluebird
12.500
33.000
19.000
0.031
9.00
8200
GUIDE
3D
Western Bluebird
2.4”-3” | 6-7.5 cm
7.9”-10.6” | 20-27 cm (Wingspan)
5.1”-6.3” | 13-16 cm
.6-1.1 oz | 18-30 g
2-13 years
White-Breasted Nuthatch
7.500
27.000
16.000
0.030
13.00
17060
GUIDE
3D
White-Breasted Nuthatch
Blue Grosbeak (Passerina caerulea)
Scale illustration of an average Blue Grosbeak compared to other songbird species

The Blue Grosbeak (Passerina caerulea) is a medium-sized songbird with a deep blue, black, and brown plumage. The Female Blue Grosbeak is mostly brown with scattered blue feathers. The call of the Blue Grosbeak can be compared to a loud metallic sound. The Blue Grosbeak is native to Central America and the southern region of the United States. It is commonly found in open woodlands and nests in small trees or shrubs. The Blue Grossbeak mainly eats insects such as grasshoppers, crickets, snails, beetles, and caterpillars. At times it may also eat wheat, oats, rice, and corn. It mostly forages on the ground for food.

The Blue Grosbeak has a wingspan in the range of 10.2”-11.4” (26-29 cm) and total weight of .9-1.1 oz (26-32 g). The body of the Blue Grosbeak has an overall length between 5.5”-6.7” (14-17 cm), body width of 1.6”-2” (4-5 cm), and standing height of roughly 3.1”-3.9” (8-10 cm). The typical lifespan of the Blue Grosbeak is between 5-10 years.

Series of measured illustrations of the Blue Grosbeak
The Blue Grosbeak (Passerina caerulea) is a medium-sized songbird with a deep blue, black, and brown plumage. The Female Blue Grosbeak is mostly brown with scattered blue feathers. The call of the Blue Grosbeak can be compared to a loud metallic sound. The Blue Grosbeak is native to Central America.

The Blue Grosbeak has a wingspan in the range of 10.2”-11.4” (26-29 cm) and total weight of .9-1.1 oz (26-32 g). The body of the Blue Grosbeak has an overall length between 5.5”-6.7” (14-17 cm), body width of 1.6”-2” (4-5 cm), and standing height of roughly 3.1”-3.9” (8-10 cm). The typical lifespan of the Blue Grosbeak is between 5-10 years.

Series of measured illustrations of the Blue Grosbeak
Blue Grosbeak (Passerina caerulea)
Height:
3.1”-3.9” | 8-10 cm
Width:
10.2”-11.4” | 26-29 cm (Wingspan)
Length:
5.5”-6.7” | 14-17 cm
Depth:
Weight:
.9-1.1 oz | 26-32 g
Area:

Body Width: 1.6”-2” | 4-5 cm

Scientific Name
Passerina caerulea
Lifespan
5-10 years

Drawings include:

Blue Grosbeak side view, front, flying (assorted)

Downloads

2D Downloads

3D Downloads

Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata)
Comparison illustration of the size of a Blue Jay to other species of songbirds

The Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) is a songbird with a lavender-blue to mid-blue plumage as its name suggests. The call of the Blue Jay varies as each individual Blue Jay has its own vocal style and has the ability to mimic other sounds. The Blue Jay is known as a highly intelligent songbird. The Blue Jay is native to the eastern and central region of the United States. This songbird can be found near oak trees and near the edge of forests. It feeds on nuts, acorns, soft fruits, seeds, and sometimes small vertebrates. A Blue Jay generally feeds from trees, shrubs, or the ground.

The Blue Jay has a wingspan in the range of 13.4”-16.9” (34-43 cm) and total weight of 2.3-3.5 oz (65-100 g). The body of the Blue Jay has an overall length between 8.7”-11.8” (22-30 cm), body width of 2.4”-3.1” (6-8 cm), and standing height of roughly 5.7”-7.7” (14.5-19.5 cm). The typical lifespan of the Blue Jay is between 7-26 years.

Scaled collection of drawings of Blue Jay in various poses with dimensions
The Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) is a songbird with a lavender-blue to mid-blue plumage as its name suggests. The call of the Blue Jay varies as each individual Blue Jay has its own vocal style and has the ability to mimic other sounds. The Blue Jay is known as a highly intelligent songbird.

The Blue Jay has a wingspan in the range of 13.4”-16.9” (34-43 cm) and total weight of 2.3-3.5 oz (65-100 g). The body of the Blue Jay has an overall length between 8.7”-11.8” (22-30 cm), body width of 2.4”-3.1” (6-8 cm), and standing height of roughly 5.7”-7.7” (14.5-19.5 cm). The typical lifespan of the Blue Jay is between 7-26 years.

Scaled collection of drawings of Blue Jay in various poses with dimensions
Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata)
Height:
5.7”-7.7” | 14.5-19.5 cm
Width:
13.4”-16.9” | 34-43 cm (Wingspan)
Length:
8.7”-11.8” | 22-30 cm
Depth:
Weight:
2.3-3.5 oz | 65-100 g
Area:

Body Width: 2.4”-3.1” | 6-8 cm

Scientific Name
Cyanocitta cristata
Lifespan
7-26 years

Drawings include:

Blue Jay side view, front, flying (assorted)

Downloads

2D Downloads

3D Downloads

Horned Lark (Eremophila alpestris)
Comparison drawing of the Horned Lark compared to other songbirds

The Horned Lark (Eremophila alpestris) also known as the Shore Lark is a small songbird with a brown-gray plumage with a black and yellow face pattern. Its song is high-pitched and is usually used while in flight. It also sings a song described as delicate in the morning before sunrise. The Horned Lark can be found in the grasslands of the Northern hemisphere. The diet of the Horned Lark is made up of seeds and insects like grasshoppers, beetles, and caterpillars. It tends to forage in pairs or groups and form large flocks in the winter sometimes mixing with other bird species such as Tree Sparrows.

The Horned Lark has a wingspan in the range of 11.8”-13.4” (30-34 cm) and total weight of 1-1.7 oz (28-48 g). The body of the Horned Lark has an overall length between 6.3”-7.9” (16-20 cm), body width of 2”-2.4” (5-6 cm), and standing height of roughly 3.7”-4.7” (9.5-12 cm). The typical lifespan of the Horned Lark is between 2-8 years.

Set of scaled side and front drawings of the Horned Lark
The Horned Lark (Eremophila alpestris) also known as the Shore Lark is a small songbird with a brown-gray plumage with a black and yellow face pattern. Its song is high-pitched and is usually used while in flight. It also sings a song described as delicate in the morning before sunrise.

The Horned Lark has a wingspan in the range of 11.8”-13.4” (30-34 cm) and total weight of 1-1.7 oz (28-48 g). The body of the Horned Lark has an overall length between 6.3”-7.9” (16-20 cm), body width of 2”-2.4” (5-6 cm), and standing height of roughly 3.7”-4.7” (9.5-12 cm). The typical lifespan of the Horned Lark is between 2-8 years.

Set of scaled side and front drawings of the Horned Lark
Horned Lark (Eremophila alpestris)
Height:
3.7”-4.7” | 9.5-12 cm
Width:
11.8”-13.4” | 30-34 cm (Wingspan)
Length:
6.3”-7.9” | 16-20 cm
Depth:
Weight:
1-1.7 oz | 28-48 g
Area:

Body Width: 2”-2.4” | 5-6 cm

Scientific Name
Eremophila alpestris
Lifespan
2-8 years

Drawings include:

Horned Lark side view, front, flying (assorted)

Downloads

2D Downloads

3D Downloads

Brown Thrasher (Toxostoma rufum)
Scale illustration of an average Brown Thrasher compared to other songbird species

The Brown Thrasher (Toxostoma rufum) is a songbird with a red-brown plumage with black streaks on its belly. It also has a long brown bill that curves downward and yellow eyes. A Brown Thrasher has over 1,000 song types, the largest out of any species of birds. The songs of the Brown Trasher also change throughout the seasons like in the fall it sings smoother songs. The Brown Thrasher is native to the eastern and central United States and southern Canada. It likes to nest in forest edges and overgrown clearings. Typically, the Brown Thrasher eats insects, berries, nuts, seeds, earthworms, snails, and even frogs.

The Brown Thrasher has a wingspan in the range of 11.4”-13” (29-33 cm) and total weight of 2.2-3.1 oz (61-88 g). The body of the Brown Thrasher has an overall length between 9.1”-11.8” (23-30 cm), body width of 2”-2.6” (5-6.5 cm), and standing height of roughly 5.5”-7.3” (14-18.5 cm). The typical lifespan of the Brown Thrasher is between 2-13 years.

Series of measured illustrations of the Brown Thrasher
The Brown Thrasher (Toxostoma rufum) is a songbird with a red-brown plumage with black streaks on its belly. It also has a long brown bill that curves downward and yellow eyes. A Brown Thrasher has over 1,000 song types, the largest out of any species of birds.

The Brown Thrasher has a wingspan in the range of 11.4”-13” (29-33 cm) and total weight of 2.2-3.1 oz (61-88 g). The body of the Brown Thrasher has an overall length between 9.1”-11.8” (23-30 cm), body width of 2”-2.6” (5-6.5 cm), and standing height of roughly 5.5”-7.3” (14-18.5 cm). The typical lifespan of the Brown Thrasher is between 2-13 years.

Series of measured illustrations of the Brown Thrasher
Brown Thrasher (Toxostoma rufum)
Height:
5.5”-7.3” | 14-18.5 cm
Width:
11.4”-13” | 29-33 cm (Wingspan)
Length:
9.1”-11.8” | 23-30 cm
Depth:
Weight:
2.2-3.1 oz | 61-88 g
Area:

Body Width: 2”-2.6” | 5-6.5 cm

Scientific Name
Toxostoma rufum
Lifespan
2-13 years

Drawings include:

Brown Thrasher side view, front, flying (assorted)

Downloads

2D Downloads

3D Downloads

White-Breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis)
Scale illustration of an average White-Breasted Nuthatch compared to other songbird species

The White-Breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis) is a small songbird with a large head, short tail, and short wings. It has a pale-blue gray back, black head cap, and a white face and underbelly. The White Breasted Nuthatch is a noisy songbird with a range of different calls. This songbird is native to North America. It is often found in woodland edges and open areas that have large trees like parks. The diet of the White-Breasted Nuthatch is made up of insects like larvae, beetles, tree hoppers, scale insects, ants, and caterpillars. It may also eat seeds, acorns, and sunflower seeds.

The White-Breasted Nuthatch has a wingspan in the range of 7.9”-10.6” (20-27 cm) and total weight of .6-1.1 oz (18-30 g). The body of the White-Breasted Nuthatch has an overall length between 5.1”-6.3” (13-16 cm), body width of 1.6”-2” (4-5 cm), and standing height of roughly 2.4”-3” (6-7.5 cm). The typical lifespan of the White-Breasted Nuthatch is between 2-13 years.

Series of measured illustrations of the White-Breasted Nuthatch
The White-Breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis) is a small songbird with a large head, short tail, and short wings. It has a pale-blue gray back, black head cap, and a white face and underbelly. The White Breasted Nuthatch is a noisy songbird with a range of different calls.

The White-Breasted Nuthatch has a wingspan in the range of 7.9”-10.6” (20-27 cm) and total weight of .6-1.1 oz (18-30 g). The body of the White-Breasted Nuthatch has an overall length between 5.1”-6.3” (13-16 cm), body width of 1.6”-2” (4-5 cm), and standing height of roughly 2.4”-3” (6-7.5 cm). The typical lifespan of the White-Breasted Nuthatch is between 2-13 years.

Series of measured illustrations of the White-Breasted Nuthatch
White-Breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis)
Height:
2.4”-3” | 6-7.5 cm
Width:
7.9”-10.6” | 20-27 cm (Wingspan)
Length:
5.1”-6.3” | 13-16 cm
Depth:
Weight:
.6-1.1 oz | 18-30 g
Area:

Body Width: 1.6”-2” | 4-5 cm

Scientific Name
Sitta carolinensis
Lifespan
2-13 years

Drawings include:

White-Breasted Nuthatch side view, front, flying (assorted)

Downloads

2D Downloads

3D Downloads