Deep Sea Creatures are organisms that live below the photic zone of the ocean. They live in very extreme conditions like bars of pressure, small amounts of oxygen, minimal food, no sunlight, and a very cold climate. Deep Sea Creatures depend on food floating down from above. Humans have explored less than 4% of the ocean floor, and new species are discovered with every dive. Extreme differences in the pressure between the sea floor and the surface makes the creature’s survival on the surface almost impossible. As a result, in-depth research is difficult, for the most useful information can be found when the creature is alive.

How do animals survive in the deepest parts of the ocean?

Animals survive in the deepest parts of the ocean through the physical adaptions of their body. Animals that live within the deepest parts of the ocean are very small, need less to eat, and grow very slowly. Animals that live in this habitat also can withstand very cold temperatures that don’t affect them.

How do deep sea creatures see?

Deep sea creatures see by through their sensitive eyes that can see a range of color hues in almost complete darkness. Deep sea creatures have much more sensitive eyes than human beings do in lower light. Their eyes have light-sensitive proteins that let the retina’s rod cells detect light.

How do deep sea animals survive pressure?

Deep sea animals survive pressure through adaptations in their bodies that include structure, proteins, as well as cell membranes that allow them to withstand the pressure and darkness. Also, creatures that live in the deep sea do not have air sacs in their bodies which prevents them from being crushed by the pressure of the ocean.

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Deep Sea Creatures Guides
Browse through our curated Deep Sea Creatures Guides for additional categorizations, tips, details, variations, styles, and histories of Deep Sea Creatures. Guides provide additional insights into the unique properties and shared relationships between elements.
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.79”-6.7” | 2-17 cm
.79”-6.7” | 2-17 cm
1.6”-13.8” | 4-35 cm
Atolla Jellyfish
17.000
17.000
35.000
1200
3D
Atolla Jellyfish
.59”-6.3” | 1.5-16 cm
.47”-3.94” | 1.2-10 cm
.59”-6.3” | 1.5-16 cm
Bloodybelly Comb Jellyfish
16.000
10.000
16.000
100
3D
Bloodybelly Comb Jellyfish
6.3”-8.3” | 16-21 cm
.88-1.3 lb | .4-.6 kg
15-20 years
Chambered Nautilus
21.000
0.600
20.00
15400
3D
Chambered Nautilus
8.7”-19.7” | 22-50 cm
9.84”-23.62” | 25-60 cm
13”-30.7” | 33-78 cm
.04-.89 lb | .02-.4 kg
3-6 months
Crowned Jellyfish
50.000
60.000
78.000
0.400
0.50
5
3D
Crowned Jellyfish
.3”-.63” | .8-1.6 cm
.39”-.79” | 1-2 cm
.67”-1.34” | 1.7-3.4 cm
Darth Vader Jellyfish
1.600
2.000
3.400
40
3D
Darth Vader Jellyfish
7.9”-11.8” | 20-30 cm
2-13 lb | .9-5.9 kg
3-5 years
Dumbo Octopus
30.000
5.900
5.00
94040
3D
Dumbo Octopus
3’-5’6” | .91-1.68 m
33’-46’ | 10-14 m
440-2,000 lb | 200-907 kg
2-5 years
Giant Squid
168.000
1400.000
907.000
5.00
88000
3D
Giant Squid
1.57”-1.97” | 4-5 cm (Diameter)
6.56’-9.84’ | 2-3 m
.006-.09 lb | 3-44 g
100-300 years
Giant Tube Worm
5.000
300.000
0.044
300.00
4700
3D
Giant Tube Worm
15.75”-17.7” | 40-45 cm
.06-.07 lb | .025-.03 kg
Glass Octopus
45.000
0.030
14800
3D
Glass Octopus
5’-12.5’ | 1.5-3.8 m
330-463 lb | 150-210 kg
30-35 years
Goblin Shark
380.000
210.000
35.00
82000
3D
Goblin Shark
13’-18’ | 4-5.5 m
2000-2700 lb | 907-1225 kg
Unknown
Megamouth Shark
550.000
1225.000
28000
3D
Megamouth Shark
3.5”-5.1” | 9-13 cm
2.95”-3.94” | 7.5-10 cm
6.7”-9.1” | 17-23 cm
Red Paper Lantern Jellyfish
13.000
10.000
23.000
5
3D
Red Paper Lantern Jellyfish
9.5’-11.5’ | 2.9-3.5 m
135-165 lb | 61-75 kg
2-10 years
Seven-Arm Octopus
350.000
75.000
10.00
1300
3D
Seven-Arm Octopus
1”-1.6” | 2.5-4 cm
51”-79” | 1.3-2 m
.4-.5 lb | .17-.23 kg
7-10 years
Slender Snipe Eel
4.000
200.000
0.230
10.00
450
3D
Slender Snipe Eel
Atolla Jellyfish (Atolla wyvillei)
Dimensioned comparison drawing of the Atolla Jellyfish compared to other jellyfish and a person

The Atolla jellyfish, also known as Atolla wyvelli, is a deep-sea bioluminescent jellyfish. The Atolla jellyfish is a crown jellyfish and has about 20 tentacles of all equal length and then one longer tentacle it uses to capture prey. The Atolla jellyfish is named after Sir Charles Wyville Thomson, the lead scientist on the Challenger expedition. The Atolla jellyfish is also called the “alarm jellyfish” as it flashes its bioluminescent red when it is under attack in order to draw bigger predators to attack the creature it is under attack from. This “alarm” action has been mimicked by scientists in order to attract other deep sea creatures so they could be observed, such as the giant squid.

Atolla Jellyfish have a bell width between .79”-6.7” (2-17 cm), bell height of .79”-6.7” (2-17 cm), and overall length of 1.6”-13.8” (4-35 cm).

Set of scaled elevation drawings of the Atolla Jellyfish viewed from the front and side
The Atolla jellyfish, also known as Atolla wyvelli, is a deep-sea bioluminescent jellyfish. The Atolla jellyfish is a crown jellyfish and has about 20 tentacles of all equal length and then one longer tentacle it uses to capture prey. The Atolla jellyfish is named after Sir Charles Wyville Thomson.

Atolla Jellyfish have a bell width between .79”-6.7” (2-17 cm), bell height of .79”-6.7” (2-17 cm), and overall length of 1.6”-13.8” (4-35 cm).

Set of scaled elevation drawings of the Atolla Jellyfish viewed from the front and side
Atolla Jellyfish (Atolla wyvillei)
Height:
.79”-6.7” | 2-17 cm
Width:
.79”-6.7” | 2-17 cm
Length:
1.6”-13.8” | 4-35 cm
Depth:
Weight:
Area:
Scientific Name
Atolla wyvillei
Lifespan

Drawings include:

Atolla Jellyfish side elevation, front, top

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Giant Tube Worm (Riftia pachyptila)
Scale illustration of an average Giant Tube Worm compared to other worm species

The Giant Tube Worm (Rifita pachyptia) is a marine invertebrate that lives on the floor of the Pacific Ocean near hydrothermal vents. These organisms can tolerate extremely high hydrogen sulfide levels. As they have no mouth and digestive tract, the Giant Tube Worm depends on bacteria that live inside them for their food. Their bright red plume is a specialized organ that is used to exchange compounds with the sea water. The outer tube is made from chitin, a tough substance that makes the exoskeleton of crabs, lobsters, and shrimp.

The Giant Tube Worm has an overall length between 6.56’-9.84’ (2-3 m), diameter of 1.57”-1.97” (4-5 cm), and weight of .006-.09 lb (3-44 g). The typical lifespan of the Giant Tube Worm is between 100-300 years.

Series of top view illustrations of the Giant Tube Worm
The Giant Tube Worm (Rifita pachyptia) is a marine invertebrate that lives on the floor of the Pacific Ocean near hydrothermal vents. These organisms can tolerate extremely high hydrogen sulfide levels. As they have no mouth and digestive tract, the Giant Tube Worm depends on bacteria.

The Giant Tube Worm has an overall length between 6.56’-9.84’ (2-3 m), diameter of 1.57”-1.97” (4-5 cm), and weight of .006-.09 lb (3-44 g). The typical lifespan of the Giant Tube Worm is between 100-300 years.

Series of top view illustrations of the Giant Tube Worm
Giant Tube Worm (Riftia pachyptila)
Height:
Width:
1.57”-1.97” | 4-5 cm (Diameter)
Length:
6.56’-9.84’ | 2-3 m
Depth:
Weight:
.006-.09 lb | 3-44 g
Area:
Scientific Name
Riftia pachyptila
Lifespan
100-300 years

Drawings include:

Giant Tube Worm top view (assorted)

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Red Paper Lantern Jellyfish (Pandea rubra)
Measured comparison illustration of the size of a Red Paper Lantern Jellyfish to other jellyfish

The Red Paper Lantern jellyfish, known scientifically as Pandea rubea, is not a true jellyfish, but rather a hydrozoan that resembles a jellyfish in appearance that lives in the deep ocean. The Red Paper Lantern jellyfish has a cap that resembles a red paper lantern that crinkles and extends in order to propel itself. The Red Paper Lantern is found in the cold, deep, dark ocean waters in the North Pacific, North Atlantic, and Southern Ocean in Japan. The Red Paper Lantern jellyfish provides a home to other deep sea critters, such as sea spiders, amphipods, and even other, smaller, jellyfish.

Red Paper Lantern Jellyfish have a bell width between 2.95”-3.94” (7.5-10 cm), bell height of 3.5”-5.1” (9-13 cm), and overall length of 6.7”-9.1” (17-23 cm).

Scaled collection of drawings of Red Paper Lantern Jellyfish in front and side poses
The Red Paper Lantern jellyfish, known scientifically as Pandea rubea, is not a true jellyfish, but rather a hydrozoan that resembles a jellyfish in appearance that lives in the deep ocean. The Red Paper Lantern jellyfish has a cap that resembles a red paper lantern that crinkles and extends.

Red Paper Lantern Jellyfish have a bell width between 2.95”-3.94” (7.5-10 cm), bell height of 3.5”-5.1” (9-13 cm), and overall length of 6.7”-9.1” (17-23 cm).

Scaled collection of drawings of Red Paper Lantern Jellyfish in front and side poses
Red Paper Lantern Jellyfish (Pandea rubra)
Height:
3.5”-5.1” | 9-13 cm
Width:
2.95”-3.94” | 7.5-10 cm
Length:
6.7”-9.1” | 17-23 cm
Depth:
Weight:
Area:
Scientific Name
Pandea rubra
Lifespan

Drawings include:

Red Paper Lantern Jellyfish side elevation, front, top

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Glass Octopus (Vitreledonella richardi)
Dimensioned comparison drawing of the Glass Octopus compared to other cephalopods

The Glass Octopus (Vitreledonella richardi) is a transparent almost colorless cephalopod and is often compared to a living glass sculpture. Their eyes are rectangular in shape and their translucent skin serves as a defense mechanism against possible predators. The Glass Octopus can be found throughout the world in almost all tropical and subtropical waters. They tend to stay in the water depths of between 656 ft (200 m) to 13,123 ft (4,000 m). This species of octopus is rarely encountered by humans thus it is one of the least studied cephalopods. It is assumed their diet is made up of fish and small crustaceans.

The Glass Octopus has an overall length between 15.75”-17.7” (40-45 cm), mantle length of 3.5”-4.7” (9-12 cm), and weight of .06-.07 lb (.025-.03 kg).

Set of scaled elevation drawings of the Glass Octopus
The Glass Octopus (Vitreledonella richardi) is a transparent almost colorless cephalopod and is often compared to a living glass sculpture. Their eyes are rectangular in shape and their translucent skin serves as a defense mechanism against possible predators.

The Glass Octopus has an overall length between 15.75”-17.7” (40-45 cm), mantle length of 3.5”-4.7” (9-12 cm), and weight of .06-.07 lb (.025-.03 kg).

Set of scaled elevation drawings of the Glass Octopus
Glass Octopus (Vitreledonella richardi)
Height:
Width:
Length:
15.75”-17.7” | 40-45 cm
Depth:
Weight:
.06-.07 lb | .025-.03 kg
Area:

Mantle Length: 3.5”-4.7” | 9-12 cm

Scientific Name
Vitreledonella richardi
Lifespan

Drawings include:

Glass Octopus side elevation, front

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Slender Snipe Eel (Nemichthys scolopaceus)
Dimensioned comparison drawing of the Slender Snipe Eel compared to an average person and other eels

Until you take a closer look, you may assume the slender snipe eel (Nemichthys scolopaceus) as a ribbon or string because of its thin body resembling a thread. The fish is cataloged under the family Nemichthyidae with bird-like beak spotting curving tips which help it easily capture food. This true eel is light-weight, nocturnal, with eyes larger than its body size, and populates the bathypelagic and mesopelagic zones besides being the only creature with a backbone having more vertebrae. Its bird beak bore it the name deep-sea duck, and its anas evolved to the degree of being adjacent to the throat.

Slender Snipe Eels have a total length between 51”-79” (1.3-2 m0 and body height of 1”-1.6” (2.5-4 cm). The typical weight of the Slender Snipe Eel is in the range of .4-.5 lb (.17-.23 kg). Slender Snipe Eels have lifespans between 7-10 years.

Set of scaled elevation drawings of the Slender Snipe Eel
Until you take a closer look, you may assume the slender snipe eel (Nemichthys scolopaceus) as a ribbon or string because of its thin body resembling a thread. The fish is cataloged under the family Nemichthyidae with bird-like beak spotting curving tips which help it easily capture food.

Slender Snipe Eels have a total length between 51”-79” (1.3-2 m0 and body height of 1”-1.6” (2.5-4 cm). The typical weight of the Slender Snipe Eel is in the range of .4-.5 lb (.17-.23 kg). Slender Snipe Eels have lifespans between 7-10 years.

Set of scaled elevation drawings of the Slender Snipe Eel
Slender Snipe Eel (Nemichthys scolopaceus)
Height:
1”-1.6” | 2.5-4 cm
Width:
Length:
51”-79” | 1.3-2 m
Depth:
Weight:
.4-.5 lb | .17-.23 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Nemichthys scolopaceus
Lifespan
7-10 years

Drawings include:

Slender Snipe Eel side elevation, side (perspective), front, top

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