Cephalopods | Cephalopoda

Cephalopods, or inkfish, are the most intelligent, largest, and mobile of all mollusks. Cephalopods are characterized by their body symmetry, prominent head, and set of at least eight arms or tentacles. Cephalopods earned the nickname inkfish because of their common ability to be able to squirt ink. There are two existing groups of Cephalopods: Coleoidea and Nautiloidea; Coleoidea has internalized their molluscan shell while Nautiloidea still has an external shell. Cephalopods live only in marine environments and are predatory creatures. Cephalopods are capable of changing color and they usually change color in complex patterns as part of courtship behavior.

How do cephalopods move?

The main way cephalopods move is through a form of jet propulsion. They do so by drawing water into their mantle cavity and over their gills. Once the cephalopod wants to move it contracts the muscles of the mantle cavity, and water is squeezed out with enough power to propel itself in the desired direction.

What do cephalopods eat?

Cephalopods are predators and are not picky carnivores. Cephalopods typically eat crustaceans, fish, bivalves, jellyfish, and even other cephalopods. They tend to hunt at the surface of water at night without the threat of predators seeing them. Once the sun rises, they go down to deeper and darker water.

How do cephalopods mate?

Mating for cephalopods is an event that only happens once in their life, as they both die shortly after mating. When females are ready to mate, they will display a certain color. The male will mate with her by placing his sperm in the female’s pallial cavity, with a tentacle called the hectocotylus. The female cephalopod then lays the fertilized eggs.

Cephalopods

Giant Squid
Size comparison illustration of a Giant Squid compared to a scuba diver with overall length dimensions

The Giant squid, considered to be the largest living invertebrate, is a cephalopod that finds its habitat in temperate to subtropical marine waters. Due to it being a deep-ocean dweller, the giant squid can grow to an enormous size. It is characterized by having a head, a mantle with two large fins attached, eight arms, and two tentacles. Suckers can be found on the tentacles and are used to catch prey while its large eyes are thought to aid it in discerning the shapes of nearby predators. In pop culture, the giant squid is depicted as a menacing sea monster.

Giant Squids have a broad overall length between 33’-59’ (10-18 m) and a width of 3’-5’6” (.91-1.68 m). An average Giant Squid weighs between 440-2,000 lb (200-907 kg) and has a typical lifespan of 2-5 years.

Side elevation drawing of a Giant Squid in a swimming posture
The Giant squid, considered to be the largest living invertebrate, is a cephalopod that finds its habitat in temperate to subtropical marine waters. The giant squid can grow to an enormous size and is characterized by having a head, a mantle with two large fins, eight arms, and two tentacles.

Giant Squids have a broad overall length between 33’-59’ (10-18 m) and a width of 3’-5’6” (.91-1.68 m). An average Giant Squid weighs between 440-2,000 lb (200-907 kg) and has a typical lifespan of 2-5 years.

Side elevation drawing of a Giant Squid in a swimming posture
Giant Squid
Height:
Width:
3’-5’6” | .91-1.68 m
Length:
33’-59’ | 10-18 m
Depth:
Weight:
440-2,000 lb | 200-907 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Architeuthis
Lifespan
2-5 years

Drawings include:
Giant Squid floating elevation, swimming

Details & Downloads

Downloads

2D Downloads

Right Click and 'Save As' to Download

3D Downloads

Related Animals Collections
Animals