Deer are cloven hooved even-toed ungulates which range in size from 1.25’-6.5’ (.4-1.9 m) with all species, except for one, having antlers. Male deer grow antlers (except for reindeer where both males and females grow antlers) which are covered in velvet until fully grown when the velvet dies and they rub it off on vegetation.

Deer exist on every continent besides Australia and Antarctica and live in temperate, alpine, wetlands, and grasslands. A social animal, deer travel in herds and are most active during dawn and dusk. Being herbivores, much of a deer’s day is spent foraging for grasses, small shrubs, and leaves.

What do deer eat?

Deer are herbivores and generally eat grass, nuts, twigs, alfalfa, corn, fruit, and fungi. Their diet fluctuates all year to what is available each season. During the winter deer tend to eat buds, bark, and shoots, while in the spring and summer time they will generally eat corn, and acorns.

When do deer shed their antlers?

Deer shed their antlers once a year usually between January and April. The shedding process takes between 2 to 3 weeks and it can take from 24 to 48 hours for the antlers to fall off. Deer will grow new antlers throughout the summer.

Where do deer sleep?

Deer are able to sleep in spaces that feel safe and offer protection to them. They typically bed in places that shield them against cold temperatures and winds. They also like to be near food sources, and once they find a bedding space that they like they may go back to the same location often.

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Deer

Moose
5’6”-6’11” | 168-211 cm
3D
Taruca
4’11”-5’7” | 150-170 cm
3D

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White-Tailed Deer
Comparison illustration of the size of a White-Tailed Deer to an average human

White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus), also known as Virginia deer, is a common American deer species that ranges from the Arctic Circle in western Canada to Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia. The White-Tailed Deer is named for the thick white fur on the underside of the neck and the rear while the rest of their coat is reddish in the summer and a dull gray in the winter.

The hair of the White-Tailed Deer is flared during flight, and their tail resembles a signaling flag. While White-Tailed Deer from North and South America are generally accepted as one group, genetically these deer are farther apart than White-Tailed and Black-Tailed Deer in North America.

White-Tailed Deer have standing shoulder heights between 2'8"-3' (81-91 cm), head-to-body lengths in the range of 3’1”-7’2” (95-220 cm), and overall weights of 80-250 lb (36-113 kg). The lifespan of a wild White-Tailed Deer is roughly 6-15 years.

Series of side elevation illustrations of the White-Tailed Deer
White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus), also known as Virginia deer, is a common American deer species that ranges from the Arctic Circle in western Canada to Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia. The White-Tailed Deer is named for the thick white fur on the underside of the neck and the rear.

White-Tailed Deer have standing shoulder heights between 2'8"-3' (81-91 cm), head-to-body lengths in the range of 3’1”-7’2” (95-220 cm), and overall weights of 80-250 lb (36-113 kg). The lifespan of a wild White-Tailed Deer is roughly 6-15 years.

Series of side elevation illustrations of the White-Tailed Deer
White-Tailed Deer
Height:
2'8"-3' | 81-91 cm
Width:
Length:
3’1”-7’2” | 95-220 cm
Depth:
Weight:
80-250 lb | 36-113 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Odocoileus virginianus
Lifespan
6-15 years

Drawings include:

White-Tailed Deer side elevation (standing), front (standing), side (running)

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Chital
Comparison illustration of the size of a Chital to an average human

The Chital (Axis Axis) is a deer species native to the Indian South, also known as the Spotted Deer, and the Axis Deer. In India and Sri Lanka, it lives in herds of up to 100 or more in grasslands and forests. The Chital's coat is brown, reddish overhead, and a white patch underneath and along the side of their bodies.

The male Chital usually has three-tined antlers that branch lengths of up to 39 inches (100 cm). Chital are most active in the morning hours and will rest in the midday heat in shaded areas. Though the grass is most of their diet, Chital will browse the trees during the dry season and even stand at their rear legs to access higher leaves.

Chital have standing shoulder heights between 2’6”-3’3” (75-100 cm), head-to-body lengths in the range of 3’7”-4’7” (110-140 cm), and overall weights of 99-187 lb (45-85 kg). The lifespan of a wild Chital is roughly 10-15 years.

Collection of scaled drawings of the Chital
The Chital (Axis Axis) is a deer species native to the Indian South, also known as the Spotted Deer, and the Axis Deer. In India and Sri Lanka, it lives in herds of up to 100 or more in grasslands and forests. The Chital's coat is brown, reddish overhead, and has white patch underside features.

Chital have standing shoulder heights between 2’6”-3’3” (75-100 cm), head-to-body lengths in the range of 3’7”-4’7” (110-140 cm), and overall weights of 99-187 lb (45-85 kg). The lifespan of a wild Chital is roughly 10-15 years.

Collection of scaled drawings of the Chital
Chital
Height:
2’6”-3’3” | 75-100 cm
Width:
Length:
3’7”-4’7” | 110-140 cm
Depth:
Weight:
99-187 lb | 45-85 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Axis axis
Lifespan
10-15 years

Drawings include:

Chital side elevation (standing), front (standing)

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Sambar Deer
Scaled drawing comparing the size of a Sambar Deer to a typical person

Sambar Deer (Cervus unicolor) are a widely spread species of deer native to India, but range to Nepal and the east across Southeast Asia. The Sambar lives in the woodland areas, alone or in small groups. The coat of a Sambar Deer forms a rough dark brown layer around its neck.

The male Sambar grows long three-tined antlers. Because of its large scale, the Sambar Deer can consume a lot of food every single day with a diet that consists of grass and herbs found around their surroundings.

Sambar Deer have standing shoulder heights between 3’4”-5’3” (101-160 cm), head-to-body lengths in the range of 5’4”-8’10” (163-269 cm), and overall weights of 220-1200 lb (100-544 kg). The lifespan of a wild Sambar Deer is roughly 10-20 years.

Series of side elevation illustrations of the Sambar Deer
Sambar Deer (Cervus unicolor) are a widely spread species of deer native to India, but range to Nepal and the east across Southeast Asia. The Sambar lives in the woodland areas, alone or in small groups. The coat of a Sambar Deer forms a rough dark brown layer around its neck.

Sambar Deer have standing shoulder heights between 3’4”-5’3” (101-160 cm), head-to-body lengths in the range of 5’4”-8’10” (163-269 cm), and overall weights of 220-1200 lb (100-544 kg). The lifespan of a wild Sambar Deer is roughly 10-20 years.

Series of side elevation illustrations of the Sambar Deer
Sambar Deer
Height:
3’4”-5’3” | 101-160 cm
Width:
Length:
5’4”-8’10” | 163-269 cm
Depth:
Weight:
220-1200 lb | 100-544 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Rusa unicolor
Lifespan
10-20 years

Drawings include:

Sambar Deer side elevation (standing), front (standing)

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Moose | Eurasian Elk
Scaled drawing comparing the size of a Moose (Eurasian Elk) to a typical person

Moose (Alces alces), also known as Eurasian Elk, are found in the northern parts of North America, Europe, and Asia, are the largest member of the deer family. Moose comes from the word ‘moosh’ meaning “stripper and eater of bark” in the language of the Innu of Canada and is the common name for these mammals in North America. In Europe however, moose are called elk.

Physically, moose are grand in size due to their long legs, broad muzzle, and wide antlers. The shape of their muzzle aids in these mammals’ feeding on submerged aquatic vegetation. Personality-wise, moose are valiant and ready to be on the defense against predators such as grizzly bears, black bears, and wolf packs.

Moose (Eurasian Elk) have standing shoulder heights between 5’6”-6’11” (168-211 cm), head-to-body lengths in the range of 9.2’-10’ (280-305 cm), and overall weights of 600-1500 lb (270-680 kg). The lifespan of a wild Moose is roughly 15-25 years.

Series of side elevation illustrations of the Moose (Eurasian) Elk
Moose (Alces alces), also known as Eurasian Elk, are found in the northern parts of North America, Europe, and Asia, are the largest member of the deer family. Moose comes from the word ‘moosh’ meaning “stripper and eater of bark" in the language of the Innu of Canada.

Moose (Eurasian Elk) have standing shoulder heights between 5’6”-6’11” (168-211 cm), head-to-body lengths in the range of 9.2’-10’ (280-305 cm), and overall weights of 600-1500 lb (270-680 kg). The lifespan of a wild Moose is roughly 15-25 years.

Series of side elevation illustrations of the Moose (Eurasian) Elk
Moose | Eurasian Elk
Height:
5’6”-6’11” | 168-211 cm
Width:
Length:
9.2’-10’ | 280-305 cm
Depth:
Weight:
600-1500 lb | 270-680 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Alces alces
Lifespan
15-25 years

Drawings include:

Moose (Eurasian Elk) side elevation (standing), front (standing), side (lying down), side (walking)

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Pudú
Scaled drawing comparing the size of a Pudú to a typical person

The Pudú (Pudu mephistophiles) is the smallest deer in the world, with the northern Pudú being marginally smaller than the southern Pudú.  It has four slender, short legs with a sturdy body. Pudús have eyes that are small and black, with black necks, and 3 inch (8 cm) rounded long ears.

Males do grow antlers, but they are only several inches long because of their small body size. The cautious movements of Pudú keep the species hidden to prevent raising the chance of being detected by predators. Pudús generally only go out into open plains for food then rush back into the forest.

Pudú have standing shoulder heights between 1’2”-1’3” (35-38 cm), head-to-body lengths in the range of 2’7”-2’9” (80-85 cm), and overall weights of 20-33 lb (9-15 kg). The lifespan of a wild Pudú is roughly 8-10 years.

Group of illustrated side elevation drawings of the Pudú
The Pudú (Pudu mephistophiles) is the smallest deer in the world, with the northern Pudú being marginally smaller than the southern Pudú. It has four slender, short legs with a sturdy body. Pudús have eyes that are small and black, with black necks, and 3 inch (8 cm) rounded long ears.

Pudú have standing shoulder heights between 1’2”-1’3” (35-38 cm), head-to-body lengths in the range of 2’7”-2’9” (80-85 cm), and overall weights of 20-33 lb (9-15 kg). The lifespan of a wild Pudú is roughly 8-10 years.

Group of illustrated side elevation drawings of the Pudú
Pudú
Height:
1’2”-1’3” | 35-38 cm
Width:
Length:
2’7”-2’9” | 80-85 cm
Depth:
Weight:
20-33 lb | 9-15 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Pudu puda
Lifespan
8-10 years

Drawings include:

Pudú side elevation (standing), front (standing)

Details & Downloads

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