Deer are cloven hooved even-toed ungulates which range in size from 1.25’-6.5’ (.4-1.9 m) with all species, except for one, having antlers. Male deer grow antlers (except for reindeer where both males and females grow antlers) which are covered in velvet until fully grown when the velvet dies and they rub it off on vegetation.

Deer exist on every continent besides Australia and Antarctica and live in temperate, alpine, wetlands, and grasslands. A social animal, deer travel in herds and are most active during dawn and dusk. Being herbivores, much of a deer’s day is spent foraging for grasses, small shrubs, and leaves.

What do deer eat?

Deer are herbivores and generally eat grass, nuts, twigs, alfalfa, corn, fruit, and fungi. Their diet fluctuates all year to what is available each season. During the winter deer tend to eat buds, bark, and shoots, while in the spring and summer time they will generally eat corn, and acorns.

When do deer shed their antlers?

Deer shed their antlers once a year usually between January and April. The shedding process takes between 2 to 3 weeks and it can take from 24 to 48 hours for the antlers to fall off. Deer will grow new antlers throughout the summer.

Where do deer sleep?

Deer are able to sleep in spaces that feel safe and offer protection to them. They typically bed in places that shield them against cold temperatures and winds. They also like to be near food sources, and once they find a bedding space that they like they may go back to the same location often.

Deer

Moose
5’6”-6’11” | 168-211 cm
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Taruca
4’11”-5’7” | 150-170 cm
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Water Deer
Scaled drawing comparing the size of a Water Deer to a typical person

The Water Deer (Hydropotes inermis), is a very small Asian deer in the Cervidae family, found in fertile Korean river bottoms, and near the Chang Jiang valley in China. They are the only species of deer in which males lack antlers, yet the Water Deer is armed with long, curved, sharp, canine teeth that poke out from the mouth.

The length of these canines can be over 2 inches (5 cm) long. The Water Deer is the only deer species that have inguinal glands. Water deer like to eat the dense vegetation that grows along the bottoms of the river—they consume a significant amount of coarse-fiber grass that serves both as food and as shelter.

Water Deer have standing shoulder heights between 1’6”-1’10” (46-56 cm), head-to-body lengths in the range of 2’6”-3’4” (76-102 cm), and overall weights of 20-30 lb (9-14 kg). The lifespan of a wild Water Deer is roughly 10-12 years.

Group of illustrated side elevation drawings of the Water Deer
The Water Deer (Hydropotes inermis), is a very small Asian deer in the Cervidae family, found in fertile Korean river bottoms, and near the Chang Jiang valley in China. They are the only species of deer in which males lack antlers, yet the mouth of the Water Deer has long curved canine teeth.

Water Deer have standing shoulder heights between 1’6”-1’10” (46-56 cm), head-to-body lengths in the range of 2’6”-3’4” (76-102 cm), and overall weights of 20-30 lb (9-14 kg). The lifespan of a wild Water Deer is roughly 10-12 years.

Group of illustrated side elevation drawings of the Water Deer
Water Deer
Height:
1’6”-1’10” | 46-56 cm
Width:
Length:
2’6”-3’4” | 76-102 cm
Depth:
Weight:
20-30 lb | 9-14 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Hydropotes inermis
Lifespan
10-12 years

Drawings include:

Water Deer side elevation (standing), front (standing)

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Tufted Deer
Scaled drawing comparing the size of a Tufted Deer to a typical person

The Tufted Deer (Elaphodus cephalophus) is a small species of deer distinguished by a conspicuous black hair tuft on its forehead. It is a similar relative of the Muntjac, except the Tufted Deer has a longer neck and legs, which give it a much leaner look. The coat is also rugged with short, straight fur, nearly black in the winter and white in the summer.

The lips, the tips of the ears, and the underside of the tails are white. The Tufted Deer roams far north in a wide region of central China in north-eastern Myanmar. Suffering from over-hunting and habitat destruction, this deer is considered near threatened.

Tufted Deer have standing shoulder heights between 1’7”-2’4” (48-71 cm), head-to-body lengths in the range of 3’7”-5’4” (109-163 cm), and overall weights of 35-110 lb (16-50 kg). The lifespan of a wild Tufted Deer is roughly 10-15 years.

Group of illustrated side elevation drawings of the Tufted Deer
The Tufted Deer (Elaphodus cephalophus) is a small species of deer distinguished by a conspicuous black hair tuft on its forehead. It is a similar relative of the Muntjac, except the Tufted Deer has a longer neck and legs, which give it a much leaner look. The coat is rugged with short straight fur.

Tufted Deer have standing shoulder heights between 1’7”-2’4” (48-71 cm), head-to-body lengths in the range of 3’7”-5’4” (109-163 cm), and overall weights of 35-110 lb (16-50 kg). The lifespan of a wild Tufted Deer is roughly 10-15 years.

Group of illustrated side elevation drawings of the Tufted Deer
Tufted Deer
Height:
1’7”-2’4” | 48-71 cm
Width:
Length:
3’7”-5’4” | 109-163 cm
Depth:
Weight:
35-110 lb | 16-50 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Elaphodus cephalophus
Lifespan
10-15 years

Drawings include:

Tufted Deer side elevation (standing), front (standing)

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Sika Deer
Comparison illustration of the size of a Sika Deer to an average human

Sika Deer (Cervus nippon), or Japanese Deer, are small to medium in scale deer that is most common found in Japan. Sika Deer have spotted bodies paired with smaller legs and heads than most deer. Like other species, male Sika Deer have antlers with three or four tines. Some males get more tines depending on if they are more dominant within the herd.

While female Sika Deer do not grow antlers, they instead have two black bumps that grow on their heads in the same position. Sika Deer are found with a wide variety of colors and patterning from a white gray or a medium tone brown.

Sika Deer have standing shoulder heights between 2’2”-3’7” (65-110 cm), head-to-body lengths in the range of 3’5”-5’1” (105-155 cm), and overall weights of 55-245 lb (25-111 kg). The lifespan of a wild Sika Deer is roughly 10-15 years.

Collection of scaled drawings of the Sika Deer
Sika Deer (Cervus nippon), or Japanese Deer, are small to medium in scale deer that is most common found in Japan. Sika Deer have spotted bodies paired with smaller legs and heads than most deer. Like other species, male Sika Deer have antlers with three or four tines.

Sika Deer have standing shoulder heights between 2’2”-3’7” (65-110 cm), head-to-body lengths in the range of 3’5”-5’1” (105-155 cm), and overall weights of 55-245 lb (25-111 kg). The lifespan of a wild Sika Deer is roughly 10-15 years.

Collection of scaled drawings of the Sika Deer
Sika Deer
Height:
2’2”-3’7” | 65-110 cm
Width:
Length:
3’5”-5’1” | 105-155 cm
Depth:
Weight:
55-245 lb | 25-111 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Cervus nippon
Lifespan
10-15 years

Drawings include:

Sika Deer side elevation (standing), front (standing), side (lying down)

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Elk | Wapiti
Scaled drawing comparing the size of a Elk (Wapiti) to a typical person

Elk (Cervus Canadensis), or Wapiti, are not only one of the world's largest game deer but also one of North America's and East Asia's largest mammals. They are attractive, and perhaps that is why they are hunted in different parts of the world for sport.

Male Elk have large 5 feet (1.5 m) wide antlers usually with 6 or 7 tines. Female Elk do not have antlers. Elk have small tails, with between 3 to 8 inches (7.6-20.3 cm) of tan-colored patch. Elk's backs are brown to tan, a bit reddish in the summer, and their bottom is darker. Elk meat becomes more and more protein-rich as they get older and its antlers are generally kept as game trophies

Elk (Wapiti) have standing shoulder heights between 4’-5’7” (122-170 cm), head-to-body lengths in the range of 6’10”-8” (208-244 cm), and overall weights of 325-1100 lb (147-500 kg). The lifespan of a wild Elk is roughly 10-15 years.

Group of illustrated side elevation drawings of the Elk (Wapiti)
Elk (Cervus Canadensis), or Wapiti, are not only one of the world's largest game deer but also one of North America's and East Asia's largest mammals. They are attractive, and perhaps that is why they are hunted in different parts of the world for sport.

Elk (Wapiti) have standing shoulder heights between 4’-5’7” (122-170 cm), head-to-body lengths in the range of 6’10”-8” (208-244 cm), and overall weights of 325-1100 lb (147-500 kg). The lifespan of a wild Elk is roughly 10-15 years.

Group of illustrated side elevation drawings of the Elk (Wapiti)
Elk | Wapiti
Height:
4’-5’7” | 122-170 cm
Width:
Length:
6’10”-8” | 208-244 cm
Depth:
Weight:
325-1100 lb | 147-500 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Cervus canadensis
Lifespan
10-15 years

Drawings include:

Elk (Wapiti) side elevation (standing), front (standing), side (lying down)

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Fallow Deer
Comparison illustration of the size of a Fallow Deer to an average human

The Fallow Deer (Dama dama) is considered a medium-sized deer with white spots covering a light brown coat. They are one of the few deer species that do not lose their spots in the months directly following their birth. The antlers of the Fallow Deer are very wide and less branched than other species.

Male Fallow Deer’s only get antlers and their development occurs over a span of up to 3 years to fully develop. Thanks to their strong legs, they are extremely fast animals that like to run in open grasslands, away from wooded areas that they only visit for resting and sheltering themselves from prey. Fallow Deer spend hours every day looking for the freshest grass to feast on.

Fallow Deer have standing shoulder heights between 2’6”-3’1” (76-94 cm), head-to-body lengths in the range of 4’3”-5’3” (130-160 cm), and overall weights of 65-220 lb (29-100 kg). The lifespan of a wild Fallow Deer is roughly 8-15 years.

Series of side elevation illustrations of the Fallow Deer
The Fallow Deer (Dama dama) is considered a medium-sized deer with white spots covering a light brown coat. They are one of the few deer species that do not lose their spots in the months directly following their birth. The antlers of the Fallow Deer are very wide and less branched than other deer.

Fallow Deer have standing shoulder heights between 2’6”-3’1” (76-94 cm), head-to-body lengths in the range of 4’3”-5’3” (130-160 cm), and overall weights of 65-220 lb (29-100 kg). The lifespan of a wild Fallow Deer is roughly 8-15 years.

Series of side elevation illustrations of the Fallow Deer
Fallow Deer
Height:
2’6”-3’1” | 76-94 cm
Width:
Length:
4’3”-5’3” | 130-160 cm
Depth:
Weight:
65-220 lb | 29-100 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Dama dama
Lifespan
8-15 years

Drawings include:

Fallow Deer side elevation (standing), front (standing), side (lying down)

Details & Downloads

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