Freshwater is a vital and scarce resource on our planet with only 3% of the water on Earth being freshwater rivers and lakes, the rest being oceans. Freshwater rivers and lakes are formed when hollows are made in the Earth, such as when land collapses after a magma flow allowing for rainwater or melted snow to flow through and accumulate in the empty space. However, even though freshwater biomes are not expansive, they are still home to over 100,000 different species of plants and animals. Many amphibian species, such as turtles, frogs, and alligators, live in freshwater biomes. Mammals, such as otters and beavers, live in freshwater biomes too, with many more mammals stopping by a river or lake for a drink.

Freshwater Animals

Hippopotamus
54.0"-78.0" (4’6"-6'6") | 1.4-2 m
3D
Hippopotamus
114.0"-168.0" (9’6"-14’) | 2.9-4.3 m
3D
Saltwater Crocodile
14’-23’ | 4.25-7 m (Male); 7.5’-11’ | 2.30-3.35 m (Female)
3D
Saltwater Crocodile
880-2200 lb | 400-1000 kg (Male); 180-220 lb | 82-100 kg (Female)
3D
Muskrat
2-4 years (wild); up to 10 years (captivity)
3D
North American Beaver
10-15 years (wild); 15-25 years (captivity)
3D

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Walleye
Measured comparison illustration of the size of a Walleye to a typical person

The Walleye (Sander vitreus) are members of the family Percidae native to most freshwater bodies in Canada and the Northern United States. Its name comes from its eyes that are pointed upwards. These freshwater fish are nocturnal and prefer to travel in shallow waters.

Walleyes are one of the most commonly stocked game fish, distinguished by a big mouth with sharp teeth, long and thin bodies with gold or olive color patterns, and a white underside. They also have five or more color bands crossed on their backs. Besides, the Walleye has two dorsal fins (one spiny and another soft-rayed) and migrate to tributary streams to breed.

Walleyes have a total length between 22”-42” (56-107 cm), body height of 4.5”-8.5” (11.4-21.6 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 3-7 lb (1.4-3.2 kg). The typical lifespan of the Walleye is 15-25 years.

Scaled collection of drawings of Walleye in front and side poses
The Walleye (Sander vitreus) are members of the family Percidae native to most freshwater bodies in Canada and the Northern United States. Its name comes from its eyes that are pointed upwards. These freshwater fish are nocturnal and prefer to travel in shallow waters.

Walleyes have a total length between 22”-42” (56-107 cm), body height of 4.5”-8.5” (11.4-21.6 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 3-7 lb (1.4-3.2 kg). The typical lifespan of the Walleye is 15-25 years.

Scaled collection of drawings of Walleye in front and side poses
Walleye
Height:
4.5”-8.5” | 11.4-21.6 cm
Width:
Length:
22”-42” | 56-107 cm
Depth:
Weight:
3-7 lb | 1.4-3.2 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Sander vitreus
Lifespan
15-25 years

Drawings include:

Walleye side elevation, front

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Alligator Gar
Dimensioned comparison drawing of the Alligator Gar compared to an average person

The Alligator Gar (Atractosteus spatula) is a freshwater fish capable of breathing both in the open air and in water. It is found in North and Central America’s lakes, swamps, bayous, and large rivers living mostly in solitary. The fish is the largest member of the family Lepisosteidae.

The Alligator Gar's razor-sharp teeth, torpedo-shaped body, and glistering scales give it a ferocious look. Its body is also covered in olive or brown color. The fish is an important ingredient in fish sport, and its ganoid scales were used by native Americans and Caribbean people as breastplates, cover plows, and arrowheads.

Alligator Gars have a total length between 5’-6.5’ (1.5-2 m), body height of 7”-9” (17.8-22.9 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 50-125 lb (22.7-56.7 kg). The typical lifespan of the Alligator Gar is 20-50 years.

Set of scaled elevation drawings of the Alligator Gar viewed from the front and side
The Alligator Gar (Atractosteus spatula) is a freshwater fish capable of breathing both in the open air and in water. It is found in North and Central America’s lakes, swamps, bayous, and large rivers living mostly in solitary. The fish is the largest member of the family Lepisosteidae.

Alligator Gars have a total length between 5’-6.5’ (1.5-2 m), body height of 7”-9” (17.8-22.9 cm), and an overall weight in the range of 50-125 lb (22.7-56.7 kg). The typical lifespan of the Alligator Gar is 20-50 years.

Set of scaled elevation drawings of the Alligator Gar viewed from the front and side
Alligator Gar
Height:
7”-9” | 17.8-22.9 cm
Width:
Length:
5’-6.5’ | 1.5-2 m
Depth:
Weight: