Procyonids | Procyonidae

Procyonidae, also referred to as the raccoon family, includes 18 species, such as, raccoons, ringtails, coatis, and more. This family is found only in the New World; that is from Canada to Argentina, in habitats ranging from forests to deserts to wetlands. Members of the Procyonidae family are typically small and slender with long tails that can be used for balancing. Due to their appearance, Procyonids are typically considered to be smaller cousins of bears, however, this is inaccurate as they are more closely related to mustelids. While the Common Raccoon has a bulky build, Procyonids are relatively small animals with slender bodies and long tails. The Procyonidae family is primarily omnivorous and will feed on animal or plant matter. Some members of the procyonidae family are social and live in groups while others are more solitary and live alone.

What are the characteristics that define Procyonids?

The characteristics that define Procyonids include them being small animals with slender bodies and long tails. Procyonids also typically have an omnivorous diet as they have lost the adaptation to eating flesh. Procyonids are solitary animals with mothers raising their litter by themselves and have less than 40 teeth.

How many species of Procyonidae are there?

There are 14 species of Procyonidae in total that belong to 6 genera and are divided into dozens of subspecies. The species of Procyonidae include the Eastern lowland olingo, Cacomistle, South American coati, and the Eastern mountain coati. Other species of Procyonidae are the Kinkajou, Crab-eating raccoon, and the Ring-tailed cat.

How old is the Procyonidae family?

The Procyonidae family is believed to have emerged as a separate family within the Carnivora order about 22.6 million years ago. The geologic history of the Procyonidae family is old and dates back to the late Eocene period. The Procyonidae family is believed to have evolved within South and Central America.

Procyonids Guides
Browse through our curated Procyonids Guides for additional categorizations, tips, details, variations, styles, and histories of Procyonids. Guides provide additional insights into the unique properties and shared relationships between elements.
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7.1”-9.4” | 18-24 cm
3.9”-5.1” | 10-13 cm
15”-18.5” | 38-47 cm (Body)
1.5-3.3 lb | .7-1.5 kg
7-24 years
Cacomistle
24.000
13.000
47.000
1.500
24.00
2700
3D
Cacomistle
10.4”-17.7” | 26.5-45 cm
6.7”-12.2” | 17-31 cm
15.75”-27.6” | 40-70 cm (Body)
7.7-23.1 lb | 3.5-10.5 kg
2-16 years
Common Raccoon
45.000
31.000
70.000
10.500
16.00
19390
3D
Common Raccoon
8.3”-12.6” | 21-32 cm
7.1”-8.7” | 18-22 cm
14.2”-21.7” | 36-55 cm (Body)
4.4-10.1 lb | 2-4.6 kg
23-40 years
Kinkajou
32.000
22.000
55.000
4.600
40.00
79000
3D
Kinkajou
8.5”-11” | 21.5-28 cm
5.7”-7.7” | 14.5-19.5 cm
13.8”-18.5” | 35-47 cm (Body)
2-3.3 lb | .9-1.5 kg
10-25 years
Northern Olingo
28.000
19.500
47.000
1.500
25.00
10
3D
Northern Olingo
6.3”-9.1” | 16-23 cm
3.5”-5.7” | 9-14.5 cm
11.8”-17.7” | 30-45 cm (Body)
2-2.6 lb | .9-1.2 kg
10-25 years
Olinguito
23.000
14.500
45.000
1.200
25.00
3400
3D
Olinguito
5.5”-7.9” | 14-20 cm
3.3”-4.7” | 8.5-12 cm
11.8”-16.5” | 30-42 cm (Body)
1.8-2.9 lb | .8-1.3 kg
7-19 years
Ringtail
20.000
12.000
42.000
1.300
19.00
4800
3D
Ringtail
8.7”-14.2” | 22-36 cm
5.5”-9.4” | 14-24 cm
16.1”-26.4” | 41-67 cm (Body)
6.6-15.4 lb | 3-7 kg
7-24 years
South American Coati
36.000
24.000
67.000
7.000
24.00
1100
3D
South American Coati
South American Coati (Nasua nasua)
Comparison drawing of the South American Coati compared to other anteaters

The South American Coati (Nasua nasua) is a coati species that lives in tropical and subtropical climates in South America. They are distinguished by the lack of their large white snout that their northern relative, the White-Nosed Coati, has. The South American Coati’s coat is variable in color and they have rings on their tail that are only somewhat visible. They are omnivores, and their diet is predominantly fruits, invertebrates, other small mammals, and bird eggs. Female South American Coatis live in large groups of 15 to 30 animals, and males are solitary.

The South American Coati has a body length in the range of 16.1”-26.4” (41-67 cm) and total weight of 6.6-15.4 lb (3-7 kg). The South American Coati has a body height between 8.7”-14.2” (22-36 cm), body width of 5.5”-9.4” (14-24 cm), and tail length of 12.6”-27.2” (32-69 cm). The typical lifespan of the South American Coati is between 7-24 years.

Set of scaled side and front drawings of the South American Coati
The South American Coati (Nasua nasua) is a coati species that lives in tropical and subtropical climates in South America. They are distinguished by the lack of their large white snout that their northern relative, the White-Nosed Coati, has. The South American Coati’s coat is variable in color.

The South American Coati has a body length in the range of 16.1”-26.4” (41-67 cm) and total weight of 6.6-15.4 lb (3-7 kg). The South American Coati has a body height between 8.7”-14.2” (22-36 cm), body width of 5.5”-9.4” (14-24 cm), and tail length of 12.6”-27.2” (32-69 cm). The typical lifespan of the South American Coati is between 7-24 years.

Set of scaled side and front drawings of the South American Coati
South American Coati (Nasua nasua)
Height:
8.7”-14.2” | 22-36 cm
Width:
5.5”-9.4” | 14-24 cm
Length:
16.1”-26.4” | 41-67 cm (Body)
Depth:
Weight:
6.6-15.4 lb | 3-7 kg
Area:

Tail Length: 12.6”-27.2” | 32-69 cm

Scientific Name
Nasua nasua
Lifespan
7-24 years

Drawings include:

South American Coati side view, front

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Cacomistle (Bassariscus sumichrasti)
Comparison drawing of the Cacomistle compared to other anteaters

The Cacomistle (Bassariscus sumichrasti) is a member of the Procyonidae family. The species inhabits wet, tropical, evergreen woodlands and mountain forests, and seasonally they may venture into drier deciduous forests. They are distributed throughout Central America from south-central Mexico to Panama. The Cacomistle has dark brown and gray fur that contrasts with the black and white striped tail. They may be confused with their close relative the Ring-Tailed Cat, but unlike the Ring-tailed Cat, the Cacomistle does not have retractable claws. Considered generalist feeders, the species eats a wide variety of foods like fruits, insects, small vertebrates, and rodents.

The Cacomistle has a body length in the range of 15”-18.5” (38-47 cm) and total weight of 1.5-3.3 lb (.7-1.5 kg). The Cacomistle has a body height between 7.1”-9.4” (18-24 cm), body width of 3.9”-5.1” (10-13 cm), and tail length of 15.4”-20.9” (39-53 cm). The typical lifespan of the Cacomistle is between 7-24 years.

Set of scaled side and front drawings of the Cacomistle
The Cacomistle (Bassariscus sumichrasti) is a member of the Procyonidae family. The species inhabits wet, tropical, evergreen woodlands and mountain forests, and seasonally they may venture into drier deciduous forests. They are distributed throughout Central America from Mexico to Panama.

The Cacomistle has a body length in the range of 15”-18.5” (38-47 cm) and total weight of 1.5-3.3 lb (.7-1.5 kg). The Cacomistle has a body height between 7.1”-9.4” (18-24 cm), body width of 3.9”-5.1” (10-13 cm), and tail length of 15.4”-20.9” (39-53 cm). The typical lifespan of the Cacomistle is between 7-24 years.

Set of scaled side and front drawings of the Cacomistle
Cacomistle (Bassariscus sumichrasti)
Height:
7.1”-9.4” | 18-24 cm
Width:
3.9”-5.1” | 10-13 cm
Length:
15”-18.5” | 38-47 cm (Body)
Depth:
Weight:
1.5-3.3 lb | .7-1.5 kg
Area:

Tail Length: 15.4”-20.9” | 39-53 cm

Scientific Name
Bassariscus sumichrasti
Lifespan
7-24 years

Drawings include:

Cacomistle side view, front

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Northern Olingo (Bassaricyon gabbii)
Comparison drawing of the Northern Olingo compared to other anteaters

The Northern Olingo (Bassaricyon gabbii) is a tree-dwelling mammal in the family Procyonidae. Their preferred habitats are montane and tropical moist forests in Central America. As a slender arboreal animal, the Northern Olingo has hind legs that are significantly longer than their fore legs. The tail is long and bushy, and the face is short and rounded with dark eyes and short round ears. The fur is thick and is usually brown or gray-brown color that becomes slightly darker along the middle of the back. The Northern Olingo is a herbivore that eats almost entirely fruit, especially figs. They will also drink the nectar of balsa trees, and very rarely they will hunt and eat small mammals like mice and squirrels.

The Northern Olingo has a body length in the range of 13.8”-18.5” (35-47 cm) and total weight of 2-3.3 lb (.9-1.5 kg). The Northern Olingo has a body height between 8.5”-11” (21.5-28 cm), body width of 5.7”-7.7” (14.5-19.5 cm), and tail length of 15”-18.9” (38-48 cm). The typical lifespan of the Northern Olingo is between 10-25 years.

Set of scaled side and front drawings of the Northern Olingo
The Northern Olingo (Bassaricyon gabbii) is a tree-dwelling mammal in the family Procyonidae. Their preferred habitats are montane and tropical moist forests in Central America. As a slender arboreal animal, the Northern Olingo has hind legs that are significantly longer than their fore legs.

The Northern Olingo has a body length in the range of 13.8”-18.5” (35-47 cm) and total weight of 2-3.3 lb (.9-1.5 kg). The Northern Olingo has a body height between 8.5”-11” (21.5-28 cm), body width of 5.7”-7.7” (14.5-19.5 cm), and tail length of 15”-18.9” (38-48 cm). The typical lifespan of the Northern Olingo is between 10-25 years.

Set of scaled side and front drawings of the Northern Olingo
Northern Olingo (Bassaricyon gabbii)
Height:
8.5”-11” | 21.5-28 cm
Width:
5.7”-7.7” | 14.5-19.5 cm
Length:
13.8”-18.5” | 35-47 cm (Body)
Depth:
Weight:
2-3.3 lb | .9-1.5 kg
Area:

Tail Length: 15”-18.9” | 38-48 cm

Scientific Name
Bassaricyon gabbii
Lifespan
10-25 years

Drawings include:

Northern Olingo side view, front

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Ringtail (Bassariscus astutus)
Comparison illustration of the size of a Ringtail to other species of anteaters

The Ringtail (Bassariscus astutus) is a widely distributed mammal that lives in the arid regions of North America. They are distributed throughout the southwestern United States, and in Mexico the species ranges from Baja California to Oaxaca. Their name is in reference to their ”ringed” tail that is long with 14-16 black and white stripes. Their pointed muzzles with long whiskers resembles that of a fox, and their body is similar to that of a cat. Ringtails are nocturnal, and their large eyes and upright ears make it easier for them to navigate and forage in the dark. They are skilled climbers, and they hunt small vertebrates; the animal will also eat berries and insects.

The Ringtail has a body length in the range of 11.8”-16.5” (30-42 cm) and total weight of 1.8-2.9 lb (.8-1.3 kg). The Ringtail has a body height between 5.5”-7.9” (14-20 cm), body width of 3.3”-4.7” (8.5-12 cm), and tail length of 12.2”-17.3” (31-44 cm). The typical lifespan of the Ringtail is between 7-19 years.

Scaled collection of drawings of Ringtail in various poses with dimensions
The Ringtail (Bassariscus astutus) is a widely distributed mammal that lives in the arid regions of North America. They are distributed throughout the southwestern United States, and in Mexico the species ranges from Baja California to Oaxaca. Their name is in reference to their ”ringed” tail.

The Ringtail has a body length in the range of 11.8”-16.5” (30-42 cm) and total weight of 1.8-2.9 lb (.8-1.3 kg). The Ringtail has a body height between 5.5”-7.9” (14-20 cm), body width of 3.3”-4.7” (8.5-12 cm), and tail length of 12.2”-17.3” (31-44 cm). The typical lifespan of the Ringtail is between 7-19 years.

Scaled collection of drawings of Ringtail in various poses with dimensions
Ringtail (Bassariscus astutus)
Height:
5.5”-7.9” | 14-20 cm
Width:
3.3”-4.7” | 8.5-12 cm
Length:
11.8”-16.5” | 30-42 cm (Body)
Depth:
Weight:
1.8-2.9 lb | .8-1.3 kg
Area:

Tail Length: 12.2”-17.3” | 31-44 cm

Scientific Name
Bassariscus astutus
Lifespan
7-19 years

Drawings include:

Ringtail side view, front

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Olinguito (Bassaricyon neblina)
Scale illustration of an average Olinguito compared to other anteater species

The Olinguito (Bassaricyon neblina) is a mammal of the Procyonidae family that lives in the montane forests in the Andes of western Colombia and Ecuador. It is the smallest procyonid, and they resemble their closest relative, the Olingo. The Olinguito has dense and woolly fur that is red-brown to orange, and the species has been described to look like a mix between a teddy bear and a cat. They are nocturnal, solitary, and are skilled jumpers that jump from tree to tree up in the forest canopy. The Olinguito is an omnivorous frugivore that mainly eats fruits, insects, and nectar.

The Olinguito has a body length in the range of 11.8”-17.7” (30-45 cm=) and total weight of 2-2.6 lb (.9-1.2 kg). The Olinguito has a body height between 6.3”-9.1” (16-23 cm), body width of 3.5”-5.7” (9-14.5 cm), and tail length of 13.2”-16.7” (33.5-42.5 cm). The typical lifespan of the Olinguito is between 10-25 years.

Series of measured illustrations of the Olinguito
The Olinguito (Bassaricyon neblina) is a mammal of the Procyonidae family that lives in the montane forests in the Andes of western Colombia and Ecuador. It is the smallest procyonid, and they resemble their closest relative, the Olingo. The Olinguito has dense and woolly fur that is red-brown.

The Olinguito has a body length in the range of 11.8”-17.7” (30-45 cm=) and total weight of 2-2.6 lb (.9-1.2 kg). The Olinguito has a body height between 6.3”-9.1” (16-23 cm), body width of 3.5”-5.7” (9-14.5 cm), and tail length of 13.2”-16.7” (33.5-42.5 cm). The typical lifespan of the Olinguito is between 10-25 years.

Series of measured illustrations of the Olinguito
Olinguito (Bassaricyon neblina)
Height:
6.3”-9.1” | 16-23 cm
Width:
3.5”-5.7” | 9-14.5 cm
Length:
11.8”-17.7” | 30-45 cm (Body)
Depth:
Weight:
2-2.6 lb | .9-1.2 kg
Area:

Tail Length: 13.2”-16.7” | 33.5-42.5 cm

Scientific Name
Bassaricyon neblina
Lifespan
10-25 years

Drawings include:

Olinguito side view, front

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