Turtles | Testudines

Turtles | Testudines

Description
Description

Turtles and tortoises are members of the Testudines reptile family characterized by their hard shells that allow them to retract their head and limbs for protection. Turtles and tortoises are separable by the fact that tortoises are land-dwelling creatures while most turtle species are at least partly aquatic creatures. Most tortoises live 80-150 years, although this is a debated fact with the Aldabra giant tortoise rumored to be able to live 255 years. Tortoises are typically herbivores, but turtles will eat aquatic plants, insects, snails, and small fish. Both turtles and tortoises are cold-blooded and rely on their habitat to maintain a comfortable body temperature.

Anatomy
Anatomy

Turtles are easily recognizable by their bony, shell-covered bodies. This shell, made of a carapace (top) and plastron (bottom), offers protection. Unlike in popular belief, turtles can't exit their shells—it's part of their skeleton! Their legs are sturdy, adapted for walking, swimming, or digging, depending on the species. While turtles don't "speak," some can make sounds, often used during mating. They possess good vision and a keen sense of smell, aiding in foraging and navigation. Despite their seemingly clunky anatomy, many turtles are surprisingly agile in water and on land.

Human Interaction
Human Interaction

Turtles have captivated humans for millennia, featured in mythologies and as beloved pets. In many cultures, they symbolize longevity and wisdom, making frequent appearances in folktales and fables. Modern pop culture celebrates turtles, most notably through the "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" franchise, endearing them to generations.

Culinary and medicinal uses have led to overexploitation in some regions. Recognizing their ecological importance and the threats they face, conservation initiatives are increasingly prominent, focusing on habitat protection, anti-poaching measures, and public awareness campaigns. Collaborative global efforts aim to ensure these ancient reptiles continue to thrive alongside humans.

Common Questions
Common Questions
What do turtles eat?

What a turtle eats depends on their species, kind of jaw it has, and the food that is available in its habitat. Some species are carnivores and others are vegetarians, but most turtles are omnivores. For example, leatherback sea turtles eat mostly jellyfish while freshwater turtles eat worms, snails, crustaceans, water plants, algae, and fallen fruit.

How do turtles mate?

Turtles mate in the spring and early summer. Some male turtles fight for the right to mate with a female while others use a mating ritual. In order to mate, the male and female turtles interlace their tails so that their shell openings align together. The female turtle later makes a nest and lays the fertilized eggs to hatch.

How long do turtles live?

How long a turtle lives is determined by its species, but most turtles can live a few decades if they survive the first few years of life. Large turtle species and tortoises can live long lives of more than 100 years.

Animals

* Under Development *

10.2”-13” | 26-33 cm
18.5”-24.4” | 47-62 cm (Carapace)
22”-29” | 56-74 cm (Carapace)
176-251 lb | 80-114 kg
11-45 years (wild); 20-70 years (captivity)
Alligator Snapping Turtle
33.000
62.000
74.000
114.000
70.00
93700
GUIDE
3D
Alligator Snapping Turtle
1.4”-1.73” | 3.5-4.4 cm
2.36”-2.75” | 6-7 cm (Carapace)
3”-3.5” | 7.6-8.9 cm (Carapace)
.2-.24 lb | .09-.11 kg
20-30 years (wild); 40-60 years (captivity)
Bog Turtle
4.400
7.000
8.900
0.110
60.00
8350
GUIDE
3D
Bog Turtle
3.75”-7.1” | 9.5-18 cm
6.3”-11.4” | 16-29 cm (Carapace)
8”-14” | 20.3-35.6 cm (Carapace)
11-44 lb | 5-20 kg
30-45 years (wild); 30-70 years (captivity)
Common Snapping Turtle
18.000
29.000
35.600
20.000
70.00
198000
GUIDE
3D
Common Snapping Turtle
14.2”-17.3” | 36-44 cm
27.5”-33” | 70-84 cm (Carapace)
31”-37” | 79-94 cm (Carapace)
154-198 lb | 70-90 kg
40-60 years (wild); 50-100 years (captivity)
Flatback Sea Turtle
44.000
84.000
94.000
90.000
100.00
2150
GUIDE
3D
Flatback Sea Turtle
27.0”-36.0” | 69-91 cm
48.0”-60.0” | 122-152 cm
330-550 lb | 150-250 kg
100-150 (wild), 175 (captivity)
Galápagos Giant Tortoise
91.000
152.000
250.000
175.00
1100
GUIDE
3D
Galápagos Giant Tortoise
14.2”-18.9” | 36-48 cm
27.5”-36.2” | 70-92 cm (Carapace)
36”-48” | 91-122 cm (Carapace)
243-419 lb | 110-190 kg
60-75 years (wild); 80-120 years (captivity)
Green Sea Turtle
48.000
92.000
122.000
190.000
120.00
46700
GUIDE
3D
Green Sea Turtle
9.4”-15” | 24-38 cm
17.7”-27.2” | 45-69 cm (Carapace)
24”-36” | 61-91 cm (Carapace)
99-198 lb | 45-90 kg
30-45 years (wild); 30-60 years (captivity)
Hawksbill Sea Turtle
38.000
69.000
91.000
90.000
60.00
15400
GUIDE
3D
Hawksbill Sea Turtle
12.6”-18.1” | 32-46 cm
24”-33.5” | 61-85 cm (Carapace)
30”-42” | 76-107 cm (Carapace)
154-375 lb | 70-170 kg
45-60 years (wild); 50-77 years (captivity)
Loggerhead Sea Turtle
46.000
85.000
107.000
170.000
77.00
43000
GUIDE
3D
Loggerhead Sea Turtle
Squirtle
105000
1’8” | 50.8 cm
19.8 lb | 9 kg
#007
Squirtle
50.800
9.000
7.00
105000
GUIDE
3D
Squirtle
Bog Turtle (Glyptemys muhlenbergii)
Size comparison drawing of the Bog Turtle compared to other small reptile species

The Bog Turtle (Glyptemys muhlenbergii) is the smallest turtle in North America, commonly found in the eastern United States. It prefers open habitats with slow-flowing water such as fens, bogs, meadows, or sedge marshes. The bog turtle is omnivorous and has a low reproduction rate, making it considered a threatened species. Its skin and carapace are black or dark brown, while its head, neck, and limbs show yellow or orange spots. Besides, each side of the neck shows distinctive yellow-orange or red spots. This coloration is used to distinguish it from the spotted turtle. The bog turtle has a domed and rectangular-shaped carapace, narrowing towards the head and widening towards the tail.

The Bog Turtle has a carapace length between 3”-3.5” (7.6-8.9 cm), carapace width of 2.36”-2.75” (6-7 cm), body height of 1.4”-1.73” (3.5-4.4 cm), and weight in the range of .2-.24 lb (.09-.11 kg). The typical lifespan of the Bog Turtle is between 20-30 years in the wild and 40-60 years in captivity.

Set of scaled top and elevation drawings of the Bog Turtle
The Bog Turtle (Glyptemys muhlenbergii) is the smallest turtle in North America, commonly found in the eastern United States. It prefers open habitats with slow-flowing water such as fens, bogs, meadows, or sedge marshes. The bog turtle is omnivorous and has a low reproduction rate.

The Bog Turtle has a carapace length between 3”-3.5” (7.6-8.9 cm), carapace width of 2.36”-2.75” (6-7 cm), body height of 1.4”-1.73” (3.5-4.4 cm), and weight in the range of .2-.24 lb (.09-.11 kg). The typical lifespan of the Bog Turtle is between 20-30 years in the wild and 40-60 years in captivity.

Set of scaled top and elevation drawings of the Bog Turtle
Bog Turtle (Glyptemys muhlenbergii)
Height:
1.4”-1.73” | 3.5-4.4 cm
Width:
2.36”-2.75” | 6-7 cm (Carapace)
Length:
3”-3.5” | 7.6-8.9 cm (Carapace)
Depth:
Weight:
.2-.24 lb | .09-.11 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Glyptemys muhlenbergii
Lifespan
20-30 years (wild); 40-60 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Bog Turtle top view, side

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Galápagos Giant Tortoise
Dimensioned size comparison drawing of a Galápagos Giant Tortoise compared to the size of an average person

The Galapagos Giant Tortoise, also referred to as the Galapagos tortoise, inhabits only two remote archipelagos: the Galapagos Islands 1000 km west of mainland Ecuador, and Aldabra in the Indian Ocean, 700 km east of Tanzania. They are the largest living species of tortoise, with tortoises on islands with humid highlands being larger with domed shells and short necks. Tortoises on islands with dry lowlands tend to be smaller. Distinguishing characteristics include a large bony shell of a dull brown or gray color that can hold its head, neck, and fore limbs when drawn back for protection. The Galapagos tortoise is an herbivore that consumes a diet of cacti, grasses, leaves, lichens, berries, oranges, and milkweed.

The typical Galápagos Giant Tortoise has an overall height of 27.0”-36.0” (69-91 cm) and body length of 48.0”-60.0” (122-152 cm). An average Galápagos Giant Tortoise weighs between 330-550 lb (150-250 kg) and has a typical lifespan of 100-150 (wild), 175 (captivity).

Series of elevation and plan illustrations of a Galápagos Giant Tortoise in various positions
The Galapagos Giant Tortoise is the largest living species of tortoise and inhabits only two remote archipelagos. Distinguishing characteristics include a large bony shell of a dull brown or gray color that can hold its head, neck, and fore limbs when drawn back for protection.

The typical Galápagos Giant Tortoise has an overall height of 27.0”-36.0” (69-91 cm) and body length of 48.0”-60.0” (122-152 cm). An average Galápagos Giant Tortoise weighs between 330-550 lb (150-250 kg) and has a typical lifespan of 100-150 (wild), 175 (captivity).

Series of elevation and plan illustrations of a Galápagos Giant Tortoise in various positions
Galápagos Giant Tortoise
Height:
27.0”-36.0” | 69-91 cm
Width:
Length:
48.0”-60.0” | 122-152 cm
Depth:
Weight:
330-550 lb | 150-250 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Chelonoidis nigra
Lifespan
100-150 (wild), 175 (captivity)

Drawings include:
Galápagos Giant Tortoise side elevation, side (person), side (walking), front, plan

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Hawksbill Sea Turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata)
Scale illustration of an average Hawksbill Sea Turtle compared to other turtle species and a person

The Hawksbill Sea Turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) can be found throughout tropical ocean coastlines around the world, prominently inhabiting coral reefs where its diet consists mainly of sponges. It has a tapered head that comes to a sharp, narrow point resembling that of a beak, making it easily distinguishable from other kinds of sea turtles. The Hawksbill Sea Turtle also has a pattern of overlapping plates on its amber-colored, serrated shell as well as a set of claws on its flippers. The color of its shell has been noted to change as a result of water temperature.

The Hawksbill Sea Turtle has a carapace length between 24”-36” (61-91 cm), carapace width of 17.7”-27.2” (45-69 cm), body height of 9.4”-15” (24-38 cm), and weight in the range of 99-198 lb (45-90 kg). The typical lifespan of the Hawksbill Sea Turtle is between 30-45 years in the wild and 30-60 years in captivity.

Series of measured illustrations of the Hawksbill Sea Turtle
The Hawksbill Sea Turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) can be found throughout tropical ocean coastlines around the world, prominently inhabiting coral reefs where its diet consists mainly of sponges. It has a tapered head that comes to a sharp, narrow point resembling that of a beak.

The Hawksbill Sea Turtle has a carapace length between 24”-36” (61-91 cm), carapace width of 17.7”-27.2” (45-69 cm), body height of 9.4”-15” (24-38 cm), and weight in the range of 99-198 lb (45-90 kg). The typical lifespan of the Hawksbill Sea Turtle is between 30-45 years in the wild and 30-60 years in captivity.

Series of measured illustrations of the Hawksbill Sea Turtle
Hawksbill Sea Turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata)
Height:
9.4”-15” | 24-38 cm
Width:
17.7”-27.2” | 45-69 cm (Carapace)
Length:
24”-36” | 61-91 cm (Carapace)
Depth:
Weight:
99-198 lb | 45-90 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Eretmochelys imbricata
Lifespan
30-45 years (wild); 30-60 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Hawksbill Sea Turtle top view, side

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Green Sea Turtle (Chelonia mydas)
Size comparison drawing of the Green Sea Turtle compared to other turtles and a person

The Green Sea Turtle (Chelonia mydas) is one of the largest species of sea turtle in the world with a habitat range in both tropical and subtropical waters, distinct in both Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Its common name is derived from the color of its skin rather than its shell, which is olive-brown. Aside from its color, the Green Sea Turtle is distinguished by its heart-shaped shell and its paddle-like flippers that make for smooth swimming. Much like other sea turtles, it will travel lengthy distances to find sites to feed as well as to lay eggs.

The Green Sea Turtle has a carapace length between 36”-48” (91-122 cm), carapace width of 27.5”-36.2” (70-92 cm), body height of 14.2”-18.9” (36-48 cm), and weight in the range of 243-419 lb (110-190 kg). The typical lifespan of the Green Sea Turtle is between 60-75 years in the wild and 80-120 years in captivity.

Set of scaled top and elevation drawings of the Green Sea Turtle
The Green Sea Turtle (Chelonia mydas) is one of the largest species of sea turtle in the world with a habitat range in both tropical and subtropical waters, distinct in both Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Its common name is derived from the color of its skin rather than its shell.

The Green Sea Turtle has a carapace length between 36”-48” (91-122 cm), carapace width of 27.5”-36.2” (70-92 cm), body height of 14.2”-18.9” (36-48 cm), and weight in the range of 243-419 lb (110-190 kg). The typical lifespan of the Green Sea Turtle is between 60-75 years in the wild and 80-120 years in captivity.

Set of scaled top and elevation drawings of the Green Sea Turtle
Green Sea Turtle (Chelonia mydas)
Height:
14.2”-18.9” | 36-48 cm
Width:
27.5”-36.2” | 70-92 cm (Carapace)
Length:
36”-48” | 91-122 cm (Carapace)
Depth:
Weight:
243-419 lb | 110-190 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Chelonia mydas
Lifespan
60-75 years (wild); 80-120 years (captivity)

Drawings include:

Green Sea Turtle top view, side

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3D Downloads

Squirtle
Scaled elevation drawing comparing the height of Squirtle to people

Squirtle, known as Zenigame in Japan, is a water type Pokémon introduced in the first generation of games as a starter Pokémon along with Bulbasaur and Charmander. Squirtle is a light-blue turtle creature with a hard brown shell and a long, curly tail. Squirtle is the lowest evolution in his family; he evolves into Wartortle and then into Blastoise. Squirtle is relatively rare to find in the wild, but he can be occasionally found around ponds and lakes. Squirtle is a very efficient swimmer, can use his shell for protection, and sprays water from his mouth to attack with great accuracy.

Squirtle has an average height of 1’8” (50.8 cm) and weight of 19.8 lb (9 kg). Squirtle is a Water type Pokémon and is listed as #007 in the National Pokédex.

Dimensioned elevation drawings of Squirtle in assorted poses
Squirtle, known as Zenigame in Japan, is a water type Pokémon introduced in the first generation of games as a starter Pokémon along with Bulbasaur and Charmander. Squirtle is a light-blue turtle creature with a hard brown shell and a long, curly tail. Squirtle is the lowest evolution in his family.

Squirtle has an average height of 1’8” (50.8 cm) and weight of 19.8 lb (9 kg). Squirtle is a Water type Pokémon and is listed as #007 in the National Pokédex.

Dimensioned elevation drawings of Squirtle in assorted poses
Squirtle
Height:
1’8” | 50.8 cm
Width:
Length:
Depth:
Weight:
19.8 lb | 9 kg
Area:

Generation: 1

Type
Water
Pokédex
#007

Drawings include:
Squirtle front elevation, side, back, fighting

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