Description
Description

Lizards, a widespread group within the class Reptilia, are found in diverse habitats worldwide, from deserts to rainforests. They evolved over 250 million years ago, diversifying into more than 6,000 species. These cold-blooded reptiles exhibit varied sizes, shapes, and colors, adapted to their environments. Some are ground dwellers; others climb or even glide. They possess scaly skin, external ear openings, and typically four limbs, though some, like the legless worm lizards, have evolved otherwise. Lizards play vital roles in ecosystems as both predators and prey, reflecting their evolutionary success and ecological importance.

Anatomy
Anatomy

Lizards, a diverse reptilian group, are recognized for their scaly skin, which sheds periodically. They typically have four legs, clawed feet, and a long tail, which some can detach to escape predators. Lizards move with agility; many can run, climb, or even glide between trees. They lack vocal cords for complex speech but can communicate through body language and some sounds. Their senses are sharp: keen eyesight for spotting prey, a flicking tongue to sample scents, and sensitive hearing. Some species, like chameleons, can change skin color for camouflage or communication, showcasing the complexity of lizard anatomy.

Human Interaction
Human Interaction

Humans have long been fascinated by lizards, their diverse forms inspiring myths, folklore, and pop culture characters, like Marvel's Lizard and the iconic Godzilla. In history, lizards have been revered and reviled, seen as both good omens and symbols of evil. Today, lizards are popular pets, admired for their exotic appeal.

On the conservation front, habitat loss and climate change pose significant threats to various lizard species. Initiatives like habitat preservation and captive breeding programs aim to protect these creatures. The relationship between humans and lizards is multifaceted, blending respect, fascination, and a growing commitment to their survival.

Common Questions
Common Questions
What do lizards eat?

What lizards eat depends on their habitat and species. Many lizards are carnivores. Lizards typically eat insects like flies and crickets, snails, spiders, and caterpillars. The larger the lizard the larger the prey tend to be. Some lizards may also eat cicadas, small mammals, and other lizards.

Why do lizards do push ups?


Lizards do push ups to attract other lizards and display their strength as well as warn others to no intrude their territory. Lizards tend to do this ritual both at dawn and dusk. Their displays of strength help avoid physical confrontations between male lizards.

How long do lizards live?

The lifespan of a lizard depends on the species, size, and if it is in captivity or in the wild. Many lizards have an average lifespan of 15 to 20 years. Lizards in captivity can live between 4 to 6 years. Smaller lizards in the wild tend to live shorter lifespans since it is harder for them defend themselves against other predators.

.39”-.55” | 1-1.4 cm
.6”-.8” | 1.5-2 cm
3”-3.5” | 7.5-9 cm
1.8-3.5 oz | 50-100 g
10-25 years
Armadillo Lizard
1.400
2.000
9.000
0.100
25.00
53600
GUIDE
3D
Armadillo Lizard
4.37”-6.5” | 11.1-16.5 cm
3.94”-5.91” | 10-15 cm
40”-60” | 101.6-152.4 cm
25-31 lb | 11-14 kg
25-69 years
Blue Iguana
16.500
15.000
152.400
14.000
69.00
34600
GUIDE
3D
Blue Iguana
.35”-.71” | .9-1.8 cm
.4”-.83” | 1-2.1 cm
3”-5.9” | 7.5-15 cm
1.6-2.5 oz | 45-70 g
3-8 years
Common House Gecko
1.800
2.100
15.000
0.070
8.00
136000
GUIDE
3D
Common House Gecko
.71”-1.1” | 1.8-2.8 cm
.98”-1.38” | 2.5-3.5 cm
7.1”-11” | 18-28 cm
1.6-3 oz | 45-85 g
10-20 years
Common Leopard Gecko
2.800
3.500
28.000
0.085
20.00
300000
GUIDE
3D
Common Leopard Gecko
.67”-1.06” | 1.7-2.7 cm
.79”-1.34” | 2-3.4 cm
5.9”-9.8” | 15-25 cm
1.2-1.9 oz | 35-55 g
5-20 years
Crested Gecko
2.700
3.400
25.000
0.055
20.00
139300
GUIDE
3D
Crested Gecko
1.1”-1.73” | 2.8-4.4 cm
1.06”-1.65” | 2.7-4.2 cm
10”-16” | 25.4-40.6 cm
2-3 oz | 57-85 g
7-14 years
Desert Iguana
4.400
4.200
40.600
0.085
14.00
6300
GUIDE
3D
Desert Iguana
1.97”-2.4” | 5-6.1 cm
3”-3.62” | 7.6-9.2 cm
20”-24” | 50.8-61 cm
.8-1.2 lb | .38-.55 kg
6-18 years
Eastern Bearded Dragon
6.100
9.200
61.000
0.550
18.00
5100
GUIDE
3D
Eastern Bearded Dragon
.35”-.83” | .9-2.1 cm
.31”-.71” | .8-1.8 cm
4”-9” | 10.2-22.9 cm
.07-.21 oz | 2-6 g
3-8 years
Green Anole
2.100
1.800
22.900
0.006
8.00
65000
GUIDE
3D
Green Anole
2.2”-4.45” | 5.6-11.3 cm
2.24”-4.49” | 5.7-11.4 cm
18”-36” | 46-91 cm
7-17.6 oz | .2-.5 kg
5-10 years
Green Basilisk
11.300
11.400
91.000
0.500
10.00
4900
GUIDE
3D
Green Basilisk
1.46”-2.05” | 3.7-5.2 cm
1.18”-1.69” | 3-4.3 cm
12”-17” | 30.5-43.2 cm
2.6-8.8 lb | 1.2-4 kg
12-25 years
Green Iguana
5.200
4.300
43.200
4.000
25.00
42000
GUIDE
3D
Green Iguana
14.17”-17.72” | 36-45 cm
13.78”-17.32” | 35-44 cm
8’-10’ | 2.43-3.05 m
150-300 lb | 68-136 kg
10-30 years
Komodo Dragon
45.000
44.000
305.000
136.000
30.00
452200
GUIDE
3D
Komodo Dragon
.63”-1.26” | 1.6-3.2 cm
.67”-1.3” | 1.7-3.3 cm
6”-12” | 15.2-30.5 cm
.7-3 oz | 20-85 g
10-20 years
Mexican Alligator Lizard
3.200
3.300
30.500
0.085
20.00
11600
GUIDE
3D
Mexican Alligator Lizard
2.44”-3.78” | 6.2-9.6 cm
1.89”-3” | 4.8-7.6 cm
13”-20” | 33-50.8 cm
2.1-6.3 oz | 60-180 g
3-7 years
Panther Chameleon
9.600
7.600
50.800
0.180
7.00
53200
GUIDE
3D
Panther Chameleon
2.95”-8.46” | 7.5-21.5 cm
1.89”-5.31” | 4.8-13.5 cm
20”-54” | 50.8-137 cm
10-20 lb | 4.5-9 kg
10-20 years
Rhino Iguana
21.500
13.500
137.000
9.000
20.00
7800
GUIDE
3D
Rhino Iguana
6.73”-8.3” | 17.1-21.1 cm
6.14”-7.48” | 15.6-19 cm
4’-5’ | 122-152 cm
11-13.2 lb | 5-6 kg
8-20 years
Savannah Monitor
21.100
19.000
152.400
6.000
20.00
35300
GUIDE
3D
Savannah Monitor
1.26”-1.69” | 3.2-4.3 cm
1.61”-2.4” | 4.1-6.1 cm
6”-8.5” | 15.2-21.6 cm
1.8-3.4 oz | 50-95 g
12-20 years
Thorny Dragon
4.300
6.100
21.600
0.095
20.00
7700
GUIDE
3D
Thorny Dragon
.59”-1.38” | 1.5-3.5 cm
.83”-1.65” | 2.1-4.2 cm
8”-16” | 20.3-40.6 cm
4.9-14.1 oz | 140-400 g
7-15 years
Tokay Gecko
3.500
4.200
40.600
0.400
15.00
50100
GUIDE
3D
Tokay Gecko
2.4”-4.33” | 6.1-11 cm
2.36”-3.94” | 6-10 cm
14”-24” | 35.6-61 cm
3-6 oz | 85-170 g
3-8 years
Veiled Chameleon
11.000
10.000
61.000
0.170
8.00
39600
GUIDE
3D
Veiled Chameleon
Komodo Dragon (Varanus komodoensis)
Comparison illustration of the size of a Komodo Dragon to other lizards

The Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) is the largest living lizard in the world. Native to Indonesia's Lesser Sunda Islands, the komodo dragon has a preference towards tropical forests and never strays far from home. It exists as a dominant predator of its ecosystems due to its size. The komodo dragon is a carnivore, feeding on that of dead animals as well as ambushing live mammals and birds with quick speed. It has also been noted to attack humans on occasion. It is characterized by a long, flat head, a body covered in armoured scales, and a tail just as long as its body.

The Komodo Dragon has an overall length between 8’-10’ (2.43-3.05 m), body width of 13.78”-17.32” (35-44 cm), body height of 14.17”-17.72” (36-45 cm), and weight between 150-300 lb (68-136 kg). The typical lifespan of the Komodo Dragon is between 10-30 years.

Scaled collection of drawings of Komodo Dragon in various poses
The Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) is the largest living lizard in the world. Native to Indonesia's Lesser Sunda Islands, the komodo dragon has a preference towards tropical forests and never strays far from home. It exists as a dominant predator of its ecosystems due to its size.

The Komodo Dragon has an overall length between 8’-10’ (2.43-3.05 m), body width of 13.78”-17.32” (35-44 cm), body height of 14.17”-17.72” (36-45 cm), and weight between 150-300 lb (68-136 kg). The typical lifespan of the Komodo Dragon is between 10-30 years.

Scaled collection of drawings of Komodo Dragon in various poses
Komodo Dragon (Varanus komodoensis)
Height:
14.17”-17.72” | 36-45 cm
Width:
13.78”-17.32” | 35-44 cm
Length:
8’-10’ | 2.43-3.05 m
Depth:
Weight:
150-300 lb | 68-136 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Varanus komodoensis
Lifespan
10-30 years

Drawings include:

Komodo Dragon top view, side

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Blue Iguana (Cyclura lewisi)
Comparison drawing of the Blue Iguana compared to other lizards

Also referred to as the Grand Cayman blue iguana, the blue iguana (Cyclura lewisi) is one of the larger species of lizard native to the Grand Cayman Island located in the Caribbean. The blue iguana’s skin color ranges from a blueish green to a darker gray that blends into its rocky environment, as it prefers a rocky landscape within the forest or by the seashore. Its preference for the latter habitat is due to the female iguana’s need to lay its eggs in the sand. The blue iguana is characterized as a diurnal herbivore skilled in climbing and easily adaptable to various surroundings.

The Blue Iguana has an overall length between 40”-60” (101.6-152.4 cm), body width of 3.94”-5.91” (10-15 cm), body height of 4.37”-6.5” (11.1-16.5 cm), and weight between 25-31 lb (11-14 kg). The typical lifespan of the Blue Iguana is between 25-69 years.

Set of scaled top and elevation drawings of the Blue Iguana
Also referred to as the Grand Cayman blue iguana, the blue iguana (Cyclura lewisi) is one of the larger species of lizard native to the Grand Cayman Island located in the Caribbean. The blue iguana’s skin color ranges from a blueish green to a darker gray that blends into its rocky environment.

The Blue Iguana has an overall length between 40”-60” (101.6-152.4 cm), body width of 3.94”-5.91” (10-15 cm), body height of 4.37”-6.5” (11.1-16.5 cm), and weight between 25-31 lb (11-14 kg). The typical lifespan of the Blue Iguana is between 25-69 years.

Set of scaled top and elevation drawings of the Blue Iguana
Blue Iguana (Cyclura lewisi)
Height:
4.37”-6.5” | 11.1-16.5 cm
Width:
3.94”-5.91” | 10-15 cm
Length:
40”-60” | 101.6-152.4 cm
Depth:
Weight:
25-31 lb | 11-14 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Cyclura lewisi
Lifespan
25-69 years

Drawings include:

Blue Iguana top view, side

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Green Anole (Anolis carolinensis)
Comparison drawing of the Green Anole compared to other lizards

The green anole (Anolis carolinensis) is a lizard commonly found in and native to the plains of the southeastern United States, such as North Carolina. It is also called the American chameleon because it can appear bright green, brown, or a combination depending on its stress or activity level and/or other environmental factors. Technically speaking however, it is not considered to be a true chameleon, which happens to have a broader range of color changes. The green anole is medium in size and has a thin body, long head, and foot pads for climbing.

The Green Anole has an overall length between 4”-9” (10.2-22.9 cm), body width of .31”-.71” (.8-1.8 cm), body height of .35”-.83” (.9-2.1 cm), and weight between .07-.21 oz (2-6 g). The typical lifespan of the Green Anole is between 3-8 years.

Set of scaled top and elevation drawings of the Green Anole
The green anole (Anolis carolinensis) is a lizard commonly found in and native to the plains of the southeastern United States, such as North Carolina. It is also called the American chameleon because it can appear bright green, brown, or a combination depending on its stress or activity level.

The Green Anole has an overall length between 4”-9” (10.2-22.9 cm), body width of .31”-.71” (.8-1.8 cm), body height of .35”-.83” (.9-2.1 cm), and weight between .07-.21 oz (2-6 g). The typical lifespan of the Green Anole is between 3-8 years.

Set of scaled top and elevation drawings of the Green Anole
Green Anole (Anolis carolinensis)
Height:
.35”-.83” | .9-2.1 cm
Width:
.31”-.71” | .8-1.8 cm
Length:
4”-9” | 10.2-22.9 cm
Depth:
Weight:
.07-.21 oz | 2-6 g
Area:
Scientific Name
Anolis carolinensis
Lifespan
3-8 years

Drawings include:

Green Anole top view, side

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2D Downloads

3D Downloads

Common House Gecko (Hemidactylus frenatus)
Scale illustration of an average Common House Gecko compared to other lizard species

Native to Southeast Asia, the common house gecko (Hemidactylus frenatus) gets its name from people’s frequent sighting of it climbing the walls of houses. It has a liking toward urban environments where it remains solitary and territorial although not harmful or dangerous. It is typically docile around humans, but If threatened will either bite or hide. It is also known by its distinct chirping form of communication or way to defend its territory. Also known as the house lizard or wall gecko, the common house gecko is nocturnal, spending its days basking in the sun and preying on insects that are attracted to porch lights during the night.

The Common House Gecko has an overall length between 3”-5.9” (7.5-15 cm), body width of .4”-.83” (1-2.1 cm), body height of .35”-.71” (.9-1.8 cm), and weight between 1.6-2.5 oz (45-70 g). The typical lifespan of the Common House Gecko is between 3-8 years.

Series of measured illustrations of the Common House Gecko
Native to Southeast Asia, the common house gecko (Hemidactylus frenatus) gets its name from people’s frequent sighting of it climbing the walls of houses. It has a liking toward urban environments where it remains solitary and territorial although not harmful or dangerous.

The Common House Gecko has an overall length between 3”-5.9” (7.5-15 cm), body width of .4”-.83” (1-2.1 cm), body height of .35”-.71” (.9-1.8 cm), and weight between 1.6-2.5 oz (45-70 g). The typical lifespan of the Common House Gecko is between 3-8 years.

Series of measured illustrations of the Common House Gecko
Common House Gecko (Hemidactylus frenatus)
Height:
.35”-.71” | .9-1.8 cm
Width:
.4”-.83” | 1-2.1 cm
Length:
3”-5.9” | 7.5-15 cm
Depth:
Weight:
1.6-2.5 oz | 45-70 g
Area:
Scientific Name
Hemidactylus frenatus
Lifespan
3-8 years

Drawings include:

Common House Gecko top view, side

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Common Leopard Gecko (Eublepharis macularius)
Comparison illustration of the size of a Common Leopard Gecko to other lizards

With a name stemming from its spotted coloration, the common leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius) is a ground-dwelling lizard that inhabits dry environments such as the desert areas of southern Asia. Considered the first domesticated species of lizard, the common leopard gecko is known as one of the most popular lizard pets. It is small and durable, with wild geckos possessing a duller coloration than that of captive geckos. The common leopard gecko is able to regenerate its tail upon voluntary disconnecting it when attacked or bitten. The new tail will appear as slightly different than the original, often short and stout.

The Common Leopard Gecko has an overall length between 7.1”-11” (18-28 cm), body width of .98”-1.38” (2.5-3.5 cm), body height of .71”-1.1” (1.8-2.8 cm), and weight between 1.6-3 oz (45-85 g). The typical lifespan of the Common Leopard Gecko is between 10-20 years.

Scaled collection of drawings of Common Leopard Gecko in various poses
With a name stemming from its spotted coloration, the common leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius) is a ground-dwelling lizard that inhabits dry environments such as the desert areas of southern Asia. It is often considered the first domesticated species of lizard.

The Common Leopard Gecko has an overall length between 7.1”-11” (18-28 cm), body width of .98”-1.38” (2.5-3.5 cm), body height of .71”-1.1” (1.8-2.8 cm), and weight between 1.6-3 oz (45-85 g). The typical lifespan of the Common Leopard Gecko is between 10-20 years.

Scaled collection of drawings of Common Leopard Gecko in various poses
Common Leopard Gecko (Eublepharis macularius)
Height:
.71”-1.1” | 1.8-2.8 cm
Width:
.98”-1.38” | 2.5-3.5 cm
Length:
7.1”-11” | 18-28 cm
Depth:
Weight:
1.6-3 oz | 45-85 g
Area:
Scientific Name
Eublepharis macularius
Lifespan
10-20 years

Drawings include:

Common Leopard Gecko top view, side

Downloads

2D Downloads

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