Reptiles are a cold-blooded vertebrate animal class that regularly sheds their outer layer of skin, yet are also very similar to birds (in fact, the crocodile is more closely related to a bird than to a lizard). Reptiles are not as old as fish, with the earliest reptile on record emerging 315 million years ago, but they were the dominant class during the Mesozoic age until the extinction of the dinosaurs. Like birds, reptiles are an air-breathing class with many of its species laying eggs instead of giving birth to live young. In fact, out of all the reptiles, the only species to give birth to live young are boas and pythons. Being cold-blooded without the ability to regulate their internal temperature, Reptiles become inactive during the cooler times of the year.

What do reptiles eat?

Reptiles are typically carnivores and feed on eating other animals like insects, mollusks, birds, frogs, mammals, fishes, or sometimes other reptiles. Some reptile species like land tortoises are vegetarians and eat leaves, grass, or cactus while the marine iguana dives into the sea to obtain seaweed for consumption.

Why do reptiles shed?

Reptiles shed their skin so that they can continue to grow. When they shed, reptiles grow a new layer of skin underneath their old skin and then shed their old one. When they shed their skin reptiles also get rid of any parasites during the process. The process of shedding is referred to as sloughing.

When did reptiles first appear?

Reptiles first appeared 315 million years ago during the time period known as the Late Carboniferous Period. This time period is also referred to as the Pennsylvanian and the Coal Age. The first reptile is considered to be the Hylonomus lyelli and is also the first animal known to have fully adapted to life on land.

Reptiles Guides
Browse through our curated Reptiles Guides for additional categorizations, tips, details, variations, styles, and histories of Reptiles. Guides provide additional insights into the unique properties and shared relationships between elements.
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
5'6" | 1.67 m
16' | 4.85 m
Ankylosaurus
167.000
485.000
66000
3D
Ankylosaurus
31’-43’ | 9.4-13 m
8’-11’ | 2.4-3.4 m
59’-69’ | 18-21 m
77,000-123,000 lb | 35-56 metric tons
Brachiosaurus
1300.000
340.000
2100.000
56000.000
61000
3D
Brachiosaurus
27.0”-36.0” | 69-91 cm
48.0”-60.0” | 122-152 cm
330-550 lb | 150-250 kg
100-150 (wild), 175 (captivity)
Galápagos Giant Tortoise
91.000
152.000
250.000
175.00
1100
3D
Galápagos Giant Tortoise
11.5' | 3.5 m
46' | 14 m
Plesiosaurus
350.000
1400.000
14000
3D
Plesiosaurus
19.5' | 6 m
6' | 1.83 m
Pterodactyl
600.000
183.000
116000
3D
Pterodactyl
14’-23’ | 4.25-7 m (Male); 7.5’-11’ | 2.30-3.35 m (Female)
880-2200 lb | 400-1000 kg (Male); 180-220 lb | 82-100 kg (Female)
70-100 (wild); 100-120 (captivity)
Saltwater Crocodile
700.000
1000.000
120.00
31000
3D
Saltwater Crocodile
21.5’ | 6.5 m
5.7’ | 1.7 m
49’-51’ | 15-15.6 m
14,100-15,900 lb | 6.4-7.2 metric tons
Spinosaurus
650.000
170.000
1560.000
7200.000
102000
3D
Spinosaurus
14’ | 4.3 m
6’ | 1.8 m
30’ | 9.1 m
11,700-15,400 lb | 5.3-7 metric tons
Stegosaurus
430.000
180.000
910.000
7000.000
90000
3D
Stegosaurus
9.5’-10.0’ | 2.9-3 m
6.7’ | 2 m
26’-29.5’ | 7.9-9 m
13,500-26,500 lb | 6.1-12 metric tons
Triceratops
300.000
200.000
900.000
12000.000
97000
3D
Triceratops
17’ | 5.2 m
6’ | 1.8 m
40’ | 12.3 m
18,500-30,800 lb | 8.4-14 metric tons
Tyrannosaurus
520.000
180.000
12300.000
14000.000
94000
3D
Tyrannosaurus
5'6" | 1.67 m
13' | 3.96 m
Velociraptor
167.000
396.000
157000
3D
Velociraptor
Spinosaurus
Comparison drawing of a Spinosaurus and a human with dimensions for height and length

Spinosaurus was a large carnivorous Cretaceous period (112-93.5 Mya) dinosaur characterized by its large thin back spikes. A giant predator on both land and water, similar to the present day crocodile, fossils prove that the Spinosaurus was as larger or larger than the Tyrannosaurus Rex.

Spinosaurus had a length of 49’-51’ (15-15.6 m), a head height of 16.5’ (5 m), an overall spine height of 21.5’ (6.5 m), and a width of 5.7' (1.7 m). Spinosaurus weighed 14,100-15,900 lb (6.4-7.2 metric tons).

Collection of drawings of a Spinosaurus from the front, back, side and plan views
Spinosaurus was a large carnivorous Cretaceous period dinosaur characterized by its large thin back spikes.

Spinosaurus had a length of 49’-51’ (15-15.6 m), a head height of 16.5’ (5 m), an overall spine height of 21.5’ (6.5 m), and a width of 5.7' (1.7 m). Spinosaurus weighed 14,100-15,900 lb (6.4-7.2 metric tons).

Collection of drawings of a Spinosaurus from the front, back, side and plan views
Spinosaurus
Height:
21.5’ | 6.5 m
Width:
5.7’ | 1.7 m
Length:
49’-51’ | 15-15.6 m
Depth:
Weight:
14,100-15,900 lb | 6.4-7.2 metric tons
Area:

Height (Head): 16.5’ | 5 m

Period: Cretaceous (112-93.5 million years ago)
Scientific Name: Spinosaurus

Scientific Name
Lifespan

Drawings include:
Spinosaurus side elevation, front, back, plan

Details & Downloads

Downloads

2D Downloads

3D Downloads

Pythons
Height:
Width:
Length:
Depth:
Weight:
Area:
Scientific Name
Lifespan
Details & Downloads

Downloads

2D Downloads

3D Downloads

Triceratops
Illustration comparing the size of a Triceratops to a human with dimensions for height and length

Triceratops were three-horned herbivorous dinosaurs that roamed western North America in the late Cretaceous period (68-66 Mya). Combined with a shield-like head plate, the horns of the Triceratops were likely used to protect them from predators and may have also been used for mating rituals.

The Triceratops had a length between 26’-29.5’ (7.9-9 m), stood at a height of 9.5’-10’ (2.9-3 m), and had a width of 6.7' (2 m). A typical Triceratops weighed between 13,500-26,500 lb (6.1-12 metric tons).

Drawings of a Triceratops from the side, front, back, and aerial views
Triceratops were three-horned herbivorous dinosaurs that roamed during the late Cretaceous period (68-66 Mya). Combined with head plate, the horns of the Triceratops were used to protect them from predators.

The Triceratops had a length between 26’-29.5’ (7.9-9 m), stood at a height of 9.5’-10’ (2.9-3 m), and had a width of 6.7' (2 m). A typical Triceratops weighed between 13,500-26,500 lb (6.1-12 metric tons).

Drawings of a Triceratops from the side, front, back, and aerial views
Triceratops
Height:
9.5’-10.0’ | 2.9-3 m
Width:
6.7’ | 2 m
Length:
26’-29.5’ | 7.9-9 m
Depth:
Weight:
13,500-26,500 lb | 6.1-12 metric tons
Area:

Period: Late Cretaceous (68-66 million years ago)

Scientific Name
Triceratops
Lifespan

Drawings include:
Triceratops side elevation, front, back, plan

Details & Downloads

Downloads

2D Downloads

3D Downloads

Ankylosaurus

The Ankylosaurus had an overall length of 16' (4.85 m) and a standing height of 5'6" (1.67 m).

Size comparison of an Ankylosaurus and a human with dimensions

The Ankylosaurus had an overall length of 16' (4.85 m) and a standing height of 5'6" (1.67 m).

Size comparison of an Ankylosaurus and a human with dimensions
Ankylosaurus
Height:
5'6" | 1.67 m
Width:
Length:
16' | 4.85 m
Depth:
Weight:
Area:
Scientific Name
Ankylosauridae
Lifespan
Details & Downloads

Downloads

2D Downloads

3D Downloads

Iguana
Height:
Width:
Length:
Depth:
Weight:
Area:
Scientific Name
Lifespan
Details & Downloads

Downloads

2D Downloads

3D Downloads

Related Animals Collections
Animals