Snakes are a family of legless, elongated, venomous or non-venomous carnivorous reptiles. Covered in scales and equipped with multiple joints in their jaws, most species of snakes live on land with some species are able to swim or fly. Thanks to their flexible jaws, most snakes eat their prey whole after they kill through either constriction, if non-venomous, or through poisoning with their venomous bite. Snakes are found on nearly every continent, except Antarctica, and are not found on many large islands, such as Ireland and Iceland. Only 600 species of snakes are venomous and only 200 of those are venomous enough to seriously harm or kill a human (about 7 percent of all snakes). Snakes shed their skin monthly and have forked tongues that they use to smell in order to hunt their prey and sense their surroundings.

What do snakes eat?

Snakes are carnivores, and their diet varies on their species. Generally, snakes eat fish, worms, termites, birds, bats, and other types of snakes. Smaller snakes eat pupae, eggs, ants, and centipedes, while larger snakes can eat deer and pigs. All snakes swallow their food whole.

How do snakes move?

Snakes have 4 methods they use to move: the serpentine, concertina, sidewinding, and rectilinear method. In the serpentine method, the most common method, snakes push off bumpy surfaces and move in a wavy motion. The concertina method is effective for tight spaces, the sidewinding method helps them move on loose or slippery surfaces, and the rectilinear method is a straight movement.

How often do snakes shed?

Snakes tend to shed their skin 2 to 4 times a year. The amount varies depending on the age and species of the snake. Younger snakes shed their skin every 2 weeks while older snakes shed their skin 2 times a year.

Snakes Guides
Browse through our curated Snakes Guides for additional categorizations, tips, details, variations, styles, and histories of Snakes. Guides provide additional insights into the unique properties and shared relationships between elements.
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
3.15”-5.9” | 8-15 cm
6.5’-12’ | 1.98-3.66 m
6.6-11 lb | 3-5 kg
12-18 years
Atlantic Bushmaster
15.000
366.000
5.000
18.00
3205
3D
Atlantic Bushmaster
1.2”-2.75” | 3-7 cm
2’-5’ | .61-1.52 m
2.6-6.6 lb | 1.2-3 kg
30-50 years
Ball Python
7.000
152.000
3.000
50.00
227400
3D
Ball Python
2”-3.9” | 5-10 cm
6.5’-14’ | 1.98-4.27 m
2.2-3.5 lb | 1-1.6 kg
10-20 years
Black Mamba
10.000
427.000
1.600
20.00
437350
3D
Black Mamba
3.5”-8.7” | 9-22 cm
8’-26’ | 2.44-7.92 m
15-165 lb | 6.8-75 kg
20-28 years
Burmese Python
22.000
792.000
75.000
28.00
72500
3D
Burmese Python
1.2”-2” | 3-5 cm
3’-6.5’ | .91-1.98 m
1-3.3 lb | .45-1.5 kg
10-20 years
California Kingsnake
5.000
198.000
1.500
20.00
16400
3D
California Kingsnake
1.6”-3.15” | 4-8 cm
6.5’-10’ | 1.98-3.05 m
26.4-33 lb | 12-15 kg
15-30 years
Carpet Python
8.000
305.000
15.000
30.00
27200
3D
Carpet Python
1.2”-2” | 3-5 cm
24”-40” | .61-1.02 m
.22-.77 lb | .1-.35 kg
10-30 years
Copperhead
5.000
102.000
0.350
30.00
227700
3D
Copperhead
.6”-1.4” | 1.5-3.5 cm
2’-6’ | .61-1.83 m
1-2 lb | .45-.9 kg
10-23 years
Corn Snake
3.500
183.000
0.900
23.00
255000
3D
Corn Snake
1”-1.4” | 2.5-3.5 cm
3.5’-6’ | 1.07-1.83 m
1.1-4.9 lb | .5-2.2 kg
10-34 years
Eastern Black Rat Snake
3.500
183.000
2.200
34.00
1200
3D
Eastern Black Rat Snake
2”-3.9” | 5-10 cm
6.5’-14’ | 1.98-4.27 m
2.2-3.3 lb | 1-1.5 kg
12-19 years
Eastern Green Mamba
10.000
427.000
1.500
19.00
3950
3D
Eastern Green Mamba
1.8”-2.75” | 4.5-7 cm
4’-6’ | 1.22-1.83 m
.9-2 lb | .4-.9 kg
15-20 years
Emerald Tree Boa
7.000
183.000
0.900
20.00
30100
3D
Emerald Tree Boa
3.7”-4.9” | 9.5-12.5 cm
4’-6’ | 1.22-1.83 m
17.6-24.3 lb | 8-11 kg
13-20 years
Gaboon Viper
12.500
183.000
11.000
20.00
140400
3D
Gaboon Viper
3.5”-7.9” | 9-20 cm
10’-30’ | 3.05-9.14 m
100-550 lb | 45-250 kg
10-32 years
Green Anaconda
20.000
914.000
250.000
32.00
77400
3D
Green Anaconda
1.6”-2.4” | 4-6 cm
5’-6.5’ | 1.52-1.98 m
2.4-3.5 lb | 1.1-1.6 kg
12-20 years
Green Tree Python
6.000
198.000
1.600
20.00
58000
3D
Green Tree Python
1”-1.4” | 2.5-3.5 cm
3.5’-5’ | 1.07-1.52 m
4.4-6.6 lb | 2-3 kg
24-32 years
Indian Cobra
3.500
152.000
3.000
32.00
38100
3D
Indian Cobra
3”-3.9” | 7.5-10 cm
6’-9’ | 1.83-2.74 m
2.2-4.4 lb | 1-2 kg
10-20 years
Inland Taipan
10.000
274.000
2.000
20.00
79900
3D
Inland Taipan
3.15”-5.5” | 8-14 cm
10’-18’ | 3.05-5.49 m
11-15 lb | 5-6.8 kg
15-23 years
King Cobra
14.000
549.000
6.800
23.00
353900
3D
King Cobra
2.4”-5.9” | 6-15 cm
5’-21’ | 1.52-6.4 m
165-385 lb | 75-175 kg
15-30 years
Reticulated Python
15.000
640.000
175.000
30.00
75800
3D
Reticulated Python
.4”-.8” | 1-2 cm
16”-38” | 41-97 cm
2.2-3.3 lb | 1-1.5 kg
9-11 years
Ribbon Snake
2.000
97.000
1.500
11.00
21005
3D
Ribbon Snake
.6”-1.2” | 1.5-3 cm
17”-36” | 43-91 cm
.8-1 lb | .36-.45 kg
18-31 years
Rosy Boa
3.000
91.000
0.450
31.00
25030
3D
Rosy Boa
.4”-.6” | 1-1.5 cm
22”-32” | 56-81 cm
.03-.07 lb | 15-30 g
5-15 years
Rough Green Snake
1.500
81.000
0.030
15.00
13300
3D
Rough Green Snake
.4”-1” | 1-2.5 cm
2’-4’ | .61-1.22 m
2-5 lb | .9-2.3 kg
7-15 years
Texas Coral Snake
2.500
122.000
2.300
15.00
7700
3D
Texas Coral Snake
.8”-1.4” | 2-3.5 cm
2’-4’ | .61-1.22 m
.55-1.3 lb | .25-.6 kg
20-25 years
Water Moccasin
3.500
122.000
0.600
25.00
191000
3D
Water Moccasin
1.4”-2.75” | 3.5-7 cm
3’-7’ | .91-2.13 m
2.6-14.8 lb | 1.2-6.7 kg
15-26 years
Western Diamondback Rattlesnake
7.000
213.000
6.700
26.00
20800
3D
Western Diamondback Rattlesnake
Emerald Tree Boa (Corallus caninus)
Scale illustration of an average Emerald Tree Boa compared to other snake species

Don’t get scared by their highly developed front teeth, as the Emerald Tree Boa (Corallus caninus) is non-venomous and would only bite its ideal prey. The snake is common in South America’s rainforest, belongs to the family Boidae, and gives birth to live offspring, usually a litter of six to fourteen. Their emerald green coat dotted with irregular white zigzag stripes makes them camouflage easily in an arboreal environment and also hunted for their beauty, which has an aesthetic benefit. These nocturnal predators prefer to coil up over branches with their heads at the center of their coils and use their prehensile tails when grasping and holding objects.

The Emerald Tree Boa has an overall length between 4’-6’ (1.22-1.83 m), body width of roughly 1.8”-2.75” (4.5-7 cm), and weight from .9-2 lb (.4-.9 kg). The typical lifespan of the Emerald Tree Boa is between 15-20 years.

Series of top view illustrations of the Emerald Tree Boa
Don’t get scared by their highly developed front teeth, as the Emerald Tree Boa (Corallus caninus) is non-venomous and would only bite its ideal prey. The snake is common in South America’s rainforest, belongs to the family Boidae, and gives birth to live offspring, usually a litter of 6-14.

The Emerald Tree Boa has an overall length between 4’-6’ (1.22-1.83 m), body width of roughly 1.8”-2.75” (4.5-7 cm), and weight from .9-2 lb (.4-.9 kg). The typical lifespan of the Emerald Tree Boa is between 15-20 years.

Series of top view illustrations of the Emerald Tree Boa
Emerald Tree Boa (Corallus caninus)
Height:
Width:
1.8”-2.75” | 4.5-7 cm
Length:
4’-6’ | 1.22-1.83 m
Depth:
Weight:
.9-2 lb | .4-.9 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Corallus caninus
Lifespan
15-20 years

Drawings include:

Emerald Tree Boa top view (assorted)

Details & Downloads

Downloads

2D Downloads

3D Downloads

Rosy Boa (Charina trivirgata)
Scale illustration of an average Rosy Boa compared to other snake species

Rather than stand ground or fight off agitators, the Rosy Boa (Charina trivirgata) will roll to look like a compact ball with the head at the center. It is common in Southwest America and even Mexico and belongs to the family Boidae with the name coming from its rosy or Salmon coloration on their belly. This small snake has three longitudinal stripes in orange, black, brown, maroon, or rust colors and favors underneath rocks, in crevices where it can escape predators. It inhabits desert, bushland, rocky mountain slopes, and scrubs; active during the day and its docile temperament make it ideal as a pet snake.

The Rosy Boa has an overall length between 17”-36” (43-91 cm), body width of roughly .6”-1.2” (1.5-3 cm), and weight from .8-1 lb (.36-.45 kg). The typical lifespan of the Rosy Boa is between 18-31 years.

Series of top view illustrations of the Rosy Boa
Rather than stand ground or fight off agitators, the Rosy Boa (Charina trivirgata) will roll to look like a compact ball with the head at the center. It is common in Southwest America and even Mexico and belongs to the family Boidae with the name coming from its rosy or Salmon coloration.

The Rosy Boa has an overall length between 17”-36” (43-91 cm), body width of roughly .6”-1.2” (1.5-3 cm), and weight from .8-1 lb (.36-.45 kg). The typical lifespan of the Rosy Boa is between 18-31 years.

Series of top view illustrations of the Rosy Boa
Rosy Boa (Charina trivirgata)
Height:
Width:
.6”-1.2” | 1.5-3 cm
Length:
17”-36” | 43-91 cm
Depth:
Weight:
.8-1 lb | .36-.45 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Charina trivirgata
Lifespan
18-31 years

Drawings include:

Rosy Boa top view (assorted)

Details & Downloads

Downloads

2D Downloads

3D Downloads

Copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix)
Dimensioned comparison drawing of the Copperhead compared to other snakes

Also called highland moccasin, chunk head, moccasin, pilot snake, and red snake, Copperheads (Agkistrodon Contortrix) favors deciduous forests, low-lying swampy regions and uses caudal luring to attract prey. They are native to eastern North America and belong to the family Viperidae. In defense mode, the Copperhead vibrates its tail or freezes or engages a series of bites when contact is made. Its name comes from its bronze-hued heads and the body color is usually in tan, copper, or grey color with distinct hourglass-shaped hued stripes. As a pit viper, it can detect prey through heat sensors, exhibit facultative parthenogenesis, and give birth to live offspring.

The Copperhead has an overall length between 24”-40” (.61-1.02 m), body width of roughly 1.2”-2” (3-5 cm), and weight from .22-.77 lb (.1-.35 kg). The typical lifespan of the Copperhead is between 10-30 years.

Set of scaled top view drawings of the Copperhead
Also called highland moccasin, chunk head, moccasin, pilot snake, and red snake, Copperheads (Agkistrodon Contortrix) favors deciduous forests, low-lying swampy regions and uses caudal luring to attract prey. They are native to eastern North America and belong to the family Viperidae.

The Copperhead has an overall length between 24”-40” (.61-1.02 m), body width of roughly 1.2”-2” (3-5 cm), and weight from .22-.77 lb (.1-.35 kg). The typical lifespan of the Copperhead is between 10-30 years.

Set of scaled top view drawings of the Copperhead
Copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix)
Height:
Width:
1.2”-2” | 3-5 cm
Length:
24”-40” | .61-1.02 m
Depth:
Weight:
.22-.77 lb | .1-.35 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Agkistrodon contortrix
Lifespan
10-30 years

Drawings include:

Copperhead top view (assorted)

Details & Downloads

Downloads

2D Downloads

3D Downloads

Texas Coral Snake (Micrurus tener)
Dimensioned comparison drawing of the Texas Coral Snake compared to other snakes

The Texas Coral snake (Micrurus tener) may have the second strongest venom, however, poor delivery of the poison makes it rarely ineffective. The snake is native to the Southern United States and is a member of the family Elapidae; usually shy, secretive, and highly unpredictable with the ability to swing around and bite when grasped. They are nocturnal, oviparous, but no pit vipers. They are small, vibrantly colored, and prefer woodland and densely forested areas. The Texas Coral snakes have rounded heads and smooth dorsal scales. Their larger, longer, and stouter bodies separate them from the Eastern Coral snake.

The Texas Coral Snake has an overall length between 2’-4’ (.61-1.22 m), body width of roughly .4”-1” (1-2.5 cm), and weight from 2-5 lb (.9-2.3 kg). The typical lifespan of the Texas Coral Snake is between 7-15 years.

Set of scaled top view drawings of the Texas Coral Snake
The Texas Coral snake (Micrurus tener) may have the second strongest venom, however, poor delivery of the poison makes it rarely ineffective. The snake is native to the Southern United States and is a member of the family Elapidae; usually shy, secretive, and highly unpredictable.

The Texas Coral Snake has an overall length between 2’-4’ (.61-1.22 m), body width of roughly .4”-1” (1-2.5 cm), and weight from 2-5 lb (.9-2.3 kg). The typical lifespan of the Texas Coral Snake is between 7-15 years.

Set of scaled top view drawings of the Texas Coral Snake
Texas Coral Snake (Micrurus tener)
Height:
Width:
.4”-1” | 1-2.5 cm
Length:
2’-4’ | .61-1.22 m
Depth:
Weight:
2-5 lb | .9-2.3 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Micrurus tener
Lifespan
7-15 years

Drawings include:

Texas Coral Snake top view (assorted)

Details & Downloads

Downloads

2D Downloads

3D Downloads

Burmese Python (Python bivittatus)
Dimensioned comparison drawing of the Burmese Python compared to other snakes

Because of their easy-going nature, the Burmese python (Python bivittatus) is largely hunted for pet trade, flesh, and skin. They belong to the family Pythonidae, native to Southeast Asia, and prefer marshy areas or semi-aquatic regions and trees. Their large, heavy body is covered in dark-colored and brown blotches. Females are slightly larger and bulkier than males. Juveniles love to spend time on trees. The Burmese python is a good swimmer, has a rapid growth rate, razor-sharp teeth, poor eyesight, and exhibits a high degree of parental care by incubating its eggs. Because they have poor eyesight, they use chemical receptors and heat sensors to stalk prey.

The Burmese Python has an overall length between 8’-26’ (2.44-7.92 m), body width of roughly 3.5”-8.7” (9-22 cm), and weight from 15-165 lb (6.8-75 kg). The typical lifespan of the Burmese Python is between 20-28 years.

Set of scaled top view drawings of the Burmese Python
Because of their easy-going nature, the Burmese python (Python bivittatus) is largely hunted for pet trade, flesh, and skin. They belong to the family Pythonidae, native to Southeast Asia, and prefer marshy areas or semi-aquatic regions and trees.

The Burmese Python has an overall length between 8’-26’ (2.44-7.92 m), body width of roughly 3.5”-8.7” (9-22 cm), and weight from 15-165 lb (6.8-75 kg). The typical lifespan of the Burmese Python is between 20-28 years.

Set of scaled top view drawings of the Burmese Python
Burmese Python (Python bivittatus)
Height:
Width:
3.5”-8.7” | 9-22 cm
Length:
8’-26’ | 2.44-7.92 m
Depth:
Weight:
15-165 lb | 6.8-75 kg
Area:
Scientific Name
Python bivittatus
Lifespan
20-28 years

Drawings include:

Burmese Python top view (assorted)

Details & Downloads

Downloads

2D Downloads

3D Downloads

Related Animals Collections
Animals