Strength Sports

Strength Sports

Description
Description

Strength sports are athletic disciplines centered around displaying and testing physical strength. Key examples include weightlifting, where athletes lift heavy weights in exercises like the snatch and clean and jerk; powerlifting, focusing on maximum lifts in the squat, bench press, and deadlift; strongman competitions, featuring varied challenges like lifting huge stones, pulling trucks, and carrying heavy objects over distances. Bodybuilding, though more focused on muscular aesthetics, also falls under this category due to its emphasis on building and showcasing muscle mass.

These sports are generally played in gyms, specialized training facilities, and competition venues designed for such events. They attract participants keen on demonstrating raw power, endurance, and the ability to handle progressively heavier loads, testing the limits of human strength and perseverance.

History
History

Strength sports have ancient origins, with early examples like Greek and Roman feats of strength and medieval strongman acts at fairs. Modern weightlifting began in the 19th century, evolving from circus and theatrical displays of power. Powerlifting emerged later, focusing on the squat, bench press, and deadlift. Strongman competitions, popularized in the late 20th century, added dynamic and varied challenges like stone lifting and vehicle pulling. Bodybuilding also gained prominence, emphasizing muscle size and symmetry.

Over time, these sports have transformed from simple demonstrations of brute strength to structured competitions with specific rules, weight classes, and a focus on technique and training discipline.

Future
Future

The landscape of strength sports is set to evolve with advancements in technology and a growing emphasis on health and fitness. Innovations in training equipment and techniques will enable athletes to train more effectively and safely. Wearable technology, offering real-time data on performance and biomechanics, will enhance training precision.

The rise in popularity of functional fitness movements, like CrossFit, is broadening the appeal of strength-based activities, attracting a diverse audience. Additionally, the integration of strength sports into mainstream fitness regimes and the increasing visibility of these sports through online platforms and social media are expected to continue driving their popularity and accessibility to a wider audience.

Common Questions
Common Questions
How do I balance strength training with other fitness activities?

Balancing strength training with other fitness activities involves strategic scheduling and understanding the body's recovery needs. Incorporate strength sessions on alternate days, allowing muscles to recover, while engaging in cardiovascular or flexibility-focused activities like running, cycling, or yoga on other days. Listen to the body's signals to avoid overtraining, and ensure adequate rest and nutrition to support diverse physical demands.

How often should I train for strength sports?

The training frequency for strength sports varies based on individual goals and experience levels. Generally, beginners may start with 2-3 sessions per week, focusing on fundamental movements. Intermediate and advanced athletes often train 4-6 times weekly, with sessions targeted at specific muscle groups or skills. Rest days are crucial for recovery, preventing overtraining and injury. Tailoring the regimen to personal progress and recovery rates is essential.

What diet should I follow for strength sports?

A diet for strength sports typically emphasizes high protein intake for muscle repair and growth, coupled with adequate carbohydrates for energy. Foods like lean meats, fish, eggs, dairy, legumes, and whole grains are staples. Balancing these with fruits, vegetables, and healthy fats from sources like nuts and avocados ensures a well-rounded nutritional profile. Hydration and timing of meals are also key factors.

Sports

* Under Development *

6’2” | 1.88 m
235-245 lb | 106-111 kg (Contest)
July 30, 1947
Arnold Schwarzenegger
188.000
111.000
1947.00
721000
GUIDE
3D
Arnold Schwarzenegger
5’2” | 1.57 m
129 lb | 59 kg (Contest)
May 1, 1968
Denise Masino
157.000
59.000
1968.00
19000
GUIDE
3D
Denise Masino
5’10.5” | 1.79 m
275 lb | 125 kg (Contest)
April 19, 1962
Dorian Yates
179.000
125.000
1962.00
39000
GUIDE
3D
Dorian Yates
5’9” | 1.75 m
212-240 lb | 96-109 kg (Contest)
August 23, 1965
Flex Wheeler
175.000
109.000
1965.00
21000
GUIDE
3D
Flex Wheeler
5’9” | 1.75 m
185 lb | 84 kg (Contest)
June 28, 1942
Frank Zane
175.000
84.000
1942.00
32000
GUIDE
3D
Frank Zane
Front Double Biceps Pose
55
GUIDE
3D
Front Double Biceps Pose
Front Lat Spread Pose
255
GUIDE
3D
Front Lat Spread Pose
5’5” | 1.65 m
121 lb | 55 kg (Contest)
September 30, 1957
Gladys Portugues
165.000
55.000
1957.00
17000
GUIDE
3D
Gladys Portugues
5’11” | 1.80 m
209 lb | 95 kg (Contest)
December 27, 1969
Joan Marie Laurer
180.000
95.000
1969.00
83400
GUIDE
3D
Joan Marie Laurer
5’8” | 1.73 m
155 lb | 70 kg (Contest)
February 10, 1971
Lisa Marie Varon
173.000
70.000
1971.00
8700
GUIDE
3D
Lisa Marie Varon
Most Muscular Pose
800
GUIDE
3D
Most Muscular Pose
6’2” | 1.88 m
240 lb | 109 kg (Contest)
August 10, 1964
Nicole Bass
188.000
109.000
1964.00
12000
GUIDE
3D
Nicole Bass
5’9” | 1.75 m
240 lb | 109 kg (Contest)
December 18, 1979
Phil Heath
175.000
109.000
1979.00
30000
GUIDE
3D
Phil Heath
5’6.5” | 1.69 m
129 lb | 59 kg (Contest)
June 21, 1955
Rachel McLish
169.000
59.000
1955.00
8300
GUIDE
3D
Rachel McLish
Rear Double Biceps Pose
10
GUIDE
3D
Rear Double Biceps Pose
5’11” | 1.80 m
287-300 lb | 130-136 kg (Contest)
May 13, 1964
Ronnie Coleman
180.000
136.000
1964.00
102000
GUIDE
3D
Ronnie Coleman
Phil Heath
Scaled height comparison drawings of Phil Heath compared to other bodybuilders

America's Phil Heath has titles in both the International Federation of Bodybuilding and Fitness (IFBB) and professional wrestling such as Total Nonstop Action (TNA) World Tag Team Championship. As a professional bodybuilder, he won Mr. Olympia seven times and participated in 25 competitions, taking the first position eighteen times and winning the Iron Man show. He has kept Mr. Olympus six successive times. He was nicknamed "The Next Big Thing" or "The Gift." Phil was the overall winner of the National Physique Committee (NPC) USA Championship, making him suitable for the IFBB Pro. He has received The Colorado Pro Championships title, two IFBB professional events, and The New York Pro Championship titles.

Phil Heath has a height of 5’9” (1.75 m) and competes in bodybuilding with a contest body weight of 240 lb (109 kg).

Set of illustrations of Phil Heath in assorted bodybuilding poses measured with overall height
America's Phil Heath has titles in both the International Federation of Bodybuilding and Fitness (IFBB) and professional wrestling such as Total Nonstop Action (TNA) World Tag Team Championship. As a professional bodybuilder, he won Mr. Olympia seven times and participated in 25 competitions.

Phil Heath has a height of 5’9” (1.75 m) and competes in bodybuilding with a contest body weight of 240 lb (109 kg).

Set of illustrations of Phil Heath in assorted bodybuilding poses measured with overall height
Phil Heath
Height:
5’9” | 1.75 m
Width:
Length:
Depth:
Weight:
240 lb | 109 kg (Contest)
Area:

Nickname: The Gift, The Next Big Thing
Years Active: 2006—

Birthday
December 18, 1979

Drawings include:
Phil Heath standing, bodybuilding poses

Downloads

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Side Triceps Pose

The Side Triceps Pose is about showing off your lateral triceps from the head to the side. Bodybuilders can pose on either side. However, it is better to rotate your body to bare your lateral triceps from both sides for the judges. While in this pose, show off your shoulder and chest size, calf development, thigh separation, side forearm development. To do the side triceps pose: face the judges with the feet a few inches apart; plant the toes on the floor, and back leg straightened. Flex the front leg while lifting the front heel. Use the back arm to grip the wrist front and aim for the small of your back. Your front upper arm should be against your side while the back palm on your rear. Then exhale while tightening the abs, legs, deltoids, and triceps.

Set of illustrations of assorted bodybuilders performing the Side Triceps Pose
The Side Triceps Pose is about showing off your lateral triceps from the head to the side. Bodybuilders can pose on either side. However, it is better to rotate your body to bare your lateral triceps from both sides for the judges.

Set of illustrations of assorted bodybuilders performing the Side Triceps Pose
Side Triceps Pose
Height:
Width:
Length:
Depth:
Weight:
Area:

Displays: Lateral triceps, shoulders, chest, side forearm, calf development, thigh separation

Birthday

Drawings include:
Side Triceps Pose assorted bodybuilders

Downloads

2D Downloads

3D Downloads

Front Double Biceps Pose

The Front Double Biceps Pose is probably the most popular type of posture you will see bodybuilders do. The bodybuilder displays their arm musculature, mostly bicep size and peak or forearm size, quadriceps size, front lat width, and front calf musculature. To do the front double bicep pose: flex both biceps and abdominals as you look towards the judges while twisting your knees slightly and tensing your legs; also ensure to inhale the stomach to enhance the rib cage. Make sure you raise your arms to lift your elbows slightly above your shoulders while tightening the bicep and ball fits as you press the elbows forward to display your lats out.

Set of illustrations of assorted bodybuilders performing the Front Double Biceps Pose
The Front Double Biceps Pose is probably the most popular type of posture you will see bodybuilders do. The bodybuilder displays their arm musculature, mostly bicep size and peak or forearm size, quadriceps size, front lat width, and front calf musculature.

Set of illustrations of assorted bodybuilders performing the Front Double Biceps Pose
Front Double Biceps Pose
Height:
Width:
Length:
Depth:
Weight:
Area:

Displays: Forearm size, front lat width, quadricep size, front calf musculature

Birthday

Drawings include:
Front Double Biceps Pose assorted bodybuilders

Downloads

2D Downloads

3D Downloads

Dorian Yates
Scaled height comparison drawings of Dorian Yates compared to other bodybuilders

Dorian Yates is a former professional English bodybuilder famous for several things. First, for being a top bodybuilder in the 21st century. Second for being a six-time Mr. Olympia winner. Third, for his thick back. Fourth, becoming first in seventeen bodybuilding competitions and second in two contests. Fifth, for being the first "mass monster" bodybuilders combining muscle mass with peak conditioning. He was a great defender of Mike Mentzer's and Arthur Jones' high-intensity training (HIT) style of bodybuilding. He retired because of chronic injuries. Dorian was labeled "The Shadow" for arriving in bodybuilding contests unexpectedly and snatching titles from other bodybuilders.

Dorian Yates has a height of 5’10.5” (1.79 m) and competes in bodybuilding with a contest body weight of 275 lb (125 kg).

Series of elevation drawings of Dorian Yates in multiple bodybuilding poses measured with overall height
Dorian Yates is a former professional English bodybuilder famous for several things. First, for being a top bodybuilder in the 21st century. Second for being a six-time Mr. Olympia winner. Third, for his thick back. Fourth, becoming first in 17 bodybuilding competitions and second in 2 contests.

Dorian Yates has a height of 5’10.5” (1.79 m) and competes in bodybuilding with a contest body weight of 275 lb (125 kg).

Series of elevation drawings of Dorian Yates in multiple bodybuilding poses measured with overall height
Dorian Yates
Height:
5’10.5” | 1.79 m
Width:
Length:
Depth:
Weight:
275 lb | 125 kg (Contest)
Area:

Nickname: The Shadow
Years Active: 1984–1997

Birthday
April 19, 1962

Drawings include:
Dorian Yates standing, bodybuilding poses

Downloads

2D Downloads

3D Downloads

Joan Marie Laurer | Chyna
Scaled height comparison drawings of Joan Marie Laurer (Chyna) compared to other bodybuilders

Joan Marie Laurer was an American professional bodybuilder, wrestler, actress, author, model, and pornographic actress who probably believed you only live once. She ascended to stardom in the World Wrestling Federation (WWF) for overcoming both female and male wrestlers in singles matches and received the tag: "Ninth Wonder of the World." She was among those who created the D-Generation X and became a one-time WWF Women's Champion and two-time WWF Intercontinental Champion. She also signed with Total Nonstop Action (TNA) and New Japan Pro-Wrestling (NJPW) and became the first woman from the D-Generation X to be granted acceptance into the WWE Hall of Fame.

Joan Marie Laurer (Chyna) had a height of 5’11” (1.80 m) and competed in bodybuilding with a contest body weight of around 209 lb (95 kg).

Collection of drawings of Joan Marie Laurer (Chyna) in various bodybuilding poses measured with overall height
Joan Marie Laurer was an American professional bodybuilder, wrestler, actress, author, model, and pornographic actress who probably believed you only live once. She ascended to stardom in the World Wrestling Federation (WWF) for overcoming both female and male wrestlers in singles matches.

Joan Marie Laurer (Chyna) had a height of 5’11” (1.80 m) and competed in bodybuilding with a contest body weight of around 209 lb (95 kg).

Collection of drawings of Joan Marie Laurer (Chyna) in various bodybuilding poses measured with overall height
Joan Marie Laurer | Chyna
Height:
5’11” | 1.80 m
Width:
Length:
Depth:
Weight:
209 lb | 95 kg (Contest)
Area:

Nickname: Chyna
, Ninth Wonder of the World
Years Active: 1995-2011

Death: April 17, 2016

Birthday
December 27, 1969

Drawings include:
Joan Marie Laurer (Chyna) standing, bodybuilding poses, wrestling moves

Downloads

2D Downloads

3D Downloads